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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

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lOMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILD- 
INGS AND GROUNDS 

February 10, 1954> 11:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, 

Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, McDermott, 
Whitmore, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



Classroom 

Building 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The committee considered architects for the proposed 
Classroom Building. It vas agreed that, in view of the death of 
Mr. Hampson, a new firm should be selected. The architects pre- 
viously named as number 2 and number 3 choice for the Classroom 
Building are heavily loaded with other work. After discussion, 
it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name archi- 
tects for the proposed Classroom Building 
in the following order of priority: 

1. James A. Britton of Greenfield 

2. Adden, Parker, Clinch & Crimp of Boston 

3. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

The committee examined preliminary plans for the "Women 1 s 

Physical 
Women's Physical Education Building as a report of progress of the Education 



1927 



Architects 



architect (Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean) . 

The committee discussed the Public Health Building. 
Chairman Bartlett pointed out that the lowest construction bid is 
far in excess of available funds. Treasurer Johnson reported that 
both the University and the State Department of Health are review- 
ing their needs in an effort to reduce costs. Both groups will 
meet with the Division of Building Construction on February 18 



Building 



Public 

Health 
Center 



1928 



COMMITTEE 



Campus 
Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and with the architect at a later date. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mr. Nichols, Director 

of the Division of Building Construction, has offered to provide 

funds so that the Trustees might prepare a master plan for future 

physical development of the University and it was 

VOTED ; To accept this offer and to thank Mr. Nichols 
for his efforts in behalf of the University. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




Secretary 



1 yl11 , be present at the meeting of the 

MMMMMMMi 

Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in Dr. Bartlett' 
Office, 294 Washington street, Boston on Wednesday, February 10, at 
11 J 00 a.m. 



^ 



P**V*k vx rfe 

Signature 



I herety agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the Co*nittee 
on Buildings and ^rounds of the Boaxxi of T^stees of the University of 
JbM.ofau.rtt8 called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:00 a.m. 
at the Office of Dr. Bartlett, 2<H Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



* 



—^ ■»!■■■■■ ., f ■» 

Signature 



1 will T °® present at the meeting of the 

vill do % -^ 

Trustee Coacaittee en Buildings and Grounds to be held in Dr. Bartlett's 
Office, 294 "Washington Street, Boston on Wednesday, February 10, at 
11*00 a.m. 




Signature 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the Committee 
on Buildings and ^rounds of the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11*00 a.m* 
at the Office of Dr. BsrHett, 294- Washington Street, Boston, Mass* 




Signature 






. 



I vill be present at the neeting of the 



**-? 



vill not 



Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in Dr. Bartlett's 
Office, 294 Washington Street, Boston on Wednesday, February 10, at 
llsOO a.m. 



ii» inq)"ml ■■. — i ■ u p ■ i iii i n ii ii m i it »— « . ft w 

Signature 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days 1 notice of the meeting of the Caaraittee 
on Buildings and ^rounds of the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:00 a«m, 
at the Office of Dr. Bartlett, 294- Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



■ u i a i mi 1 1 > iii « «j» ii an « i i i ■nun ■ ■ " «■ "' " 



Signature 



I wil1 jLsxT k® P r ©s© n t at the meeting of the 



Trustee Committee on Buildings and Grounds to be held in Dr. Bartlett's 
Office, 294 Washington Street, Boston on Wednesday, February 10, at 
llsOO a.nu 




c^^C ^ 



Signature 



"•WMM«*«MMta«H«tW 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days* notice of the meeting of the Cor&nittee 
on Buildings and Grounds of the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:00 a«m* 
at the Office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, Boston, Mass, 




?< 



Signature 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

February 10, 1954* 12:30 p.m., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, 

Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



1929 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
McDermott, "Whitmore, Provost Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that David Buttrick, alumnus 
and former Trustee of the University, has presented to the 
Trustees 750 shares of the 7% cumulative preferred stock of the 
David Buttrick Company of Arlington, Massachusetts (par value $10), 
the income to be used for scholarships. 

In his letter of December 22, 1953> Mr. Buttrick speci- 
fies: "For junior, senior, or graduate students majoring in Dairy 
Industry or Food Technology." It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees establish the 
Buttrick Scholarship Fund as an endowment 
fund of the University with a principle of 
$7,500, the value placed on the 750 shares 
of the 7% cumulative preferred stock of the 
David Buttrick Company (par value $10 per 
share) and direct that while the fund is in- 
vested in stock of the David Buttrick Company 
this fund be segregated from the pool invest- 
ment account, that it be accounted for 
separately, and that the income therefrom be 
used in accordance with the terms of the gift. 
Should the stock be sold or called, the fund 
shall then be considered and treated as a 
part of the pool investment account of the 
Trustees and the income shall be used in 
accordance with the terms of the gift. 



Buttrick 

Scholarship 

Fund 



1930 



COMMITTEE 



Sprague 
Electric 
Company 
Scholarship 



Stocks 



Fire 
Association 



Blanket 
Bonds 



Securities 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer said that the Sprague Electric Company of 

Worth Adams has presented the University with $500 to match the 

amount of a scholarship granted by the company to a student in the 

University. The Sprague Company has announced that it intends to 

award further sums in this same manner. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
Sprague Electric Company grant and add 
this income and any future grants of the 
same nature to the unrestricted trust 
funds of the University. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. Johnson, for 
and on behalf of the Trustees of the Uni- 
versity, to subscribe to 36 shares of the 
common stock of .the Fire Association of 
Philadelphia at .$22.50 per share plus one 
right per share, using the 36 rights be- 
longing to the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts. 

The committee discussed the fidelity bond covering em- 
ployees of the University and questioned its adequacy in view of 
the increasing sums of money being handled. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, to in- 
crease the primary commercial blanket 
liability bond covering all employees of 
the University to $20,000 because of the 
increase in state funds, student funds, and 
endowment funds in the custody of the Uni- 
versity. 

The committee reviewed the list of securities in the en- 
dowment portfolio. Mr. Haigis, although unable to attend the 
meeting, sent word that he had examined the list and recommended 
no change at the present time. After inspection of the list, it 
was 



.1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To make no change in security holdings for 
the present. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:10 p.m. 




Secretary 



1932 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



* wiH mmmmmmm be present at the meeting of the 

Trustee Committee on finance to be held in &r. Bartlett's Office, 
294 Vashington Street, Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, February 10,. at 
lis 30 a.aa. 




Signatui-e 



I hereby agree to vaive 7 days* notice of the .meeting of the Committee 
on Jlnaace of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at lis 30 a.nu at the 
Office of Dr. Barilett, 294 Washington Street, Boston, Mass* 




Signature 



* vi23. t be present at the meeting pf the 

will not » 

Trustee Committee on i'in&nce to be held in &r. Bartlett's Office, 
294. Vashington* Street, Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, February 10,. at 
11:30 a.m. 




Signature 



I herelby agree to valve 7 days 1 notice of the .meeting of the Committee 
on Haaaoe of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:30 a»ra. at the 
Office of Dr. Bartlett, 29-4 Washington Street, Boston, Mass, 




■ II •■ HIM «■ ■■ ■■■ nil 

Signature 



WMMMMM 



. 






• 



' 



• 



• 



. 



■ 



1 n* 11 X be present at the meeting of the 

Trustee Committee on finance to be held in *>r. Bartlett's Office, 
294 Vashington* Street, Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, February 10,. at 
11? 30 a.a. 




Signature 



I hereby agree to yaive 7 days 1 notice of the meeting of the Cotandttee 
on Finance of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:30 a.m. at the 
Office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 




Signature 



- i 






■ . 






I vill , ne present at the meeting of the 

vlll not , .. , _ 
Trustee Committee on finance to be held in &r. BartleWs Office, 
294, Vashington Street, Boston, Mass. on Wednesday, February 10, at 
3.1:30 a-ffl. 



^— *i- kf IfapV- ' 



Signature 



I herelpy agree to valve 7 days* notice of the .ueeting of the Coaadttee 
on Fiaaace of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:30 a.ia. at the 
Office of Dr. BarUett, 294. Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 






■IP'" ' 



Signature 



I will 



be present at the meeting of the 



Trustee Committee on finance to be held in *>r. Bartlett*s Office^ 
294, "Washington Street, Boston, Mass. oaf 'Wednesday , February 10, at 



11? 30 a.flo 



-v 




Signature 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days 1 notice of the meeting of the Coandttee 
on flaasce of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts 
called to convene for Wednesday, February 10, at 11:30 a.m. at th© 
Office of Dr. Bartlett, 294 Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 




/-r Un^tZ^i 



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I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 16, 1954-? 11:30 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Miss Buxton, 
Mrs. McNamara, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last previous meet- 
ing. 

There was discussion of the need for changing the terms 
of employment for members of the professional staff of the Univer- 
sity in view of the desire of the Trustees to be able to assign 
staff members to part time resident teaching combined with part 
time extension service or experiment station or control services 
work so that the staff may be utilized more effectively in the 
future. The committee also considered the need for preparing em- 
ployment forms so that in the future teachers may be employed 
either on a 9 months or a 12 months' basis. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following terms of employment for members 
of the professional staff who will be em- 
ployed on a calendar year basis. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following terms of employment for members 
of the professional staff who will serve 
for the academic year. 



1933 



Terms of 
Employment 



1934 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Amherst 



MEMORANDUM OF APPOINTMENT 
(Calendar Year) 



Date 



To 



Upon the recommendation of_ 
I hereby appoint you to the position of_ 



at a salary of 



_per year, effective on_ 



or as soon thereafter as you report for duty. 



If you accept this appointment it vill be understood 
that you agree to the terms of employment as stated on the back 
of this sheet. Please acknowledge your acceptance on the en- 
closed form. 



President 



1 



;OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 



All appointments to the staff of the University are contingent 
upon annual appropriations by the Legislature. 



Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only when 
confirmed in writing by the President of the University and 
according to the terms specified in such conf irmation. 



3. Appointments to the professional staff, unless otherwise 
stated, are for one year at a time during the first three 
years of service. At the end of the third year tenure may 
be granted by the President which will be effective without 
reappointment as long as service in and to the University is 
mutually satisfactory. 



U» The annual period of service under this appointment is 12 
months, with vacation of one month allowed in each full year 
of service. 



Duties may be assigned to the appointee in resident in- 
struction, research, extension teaching, and/or other 
programs of the University as required. 



Salaries are paid in 12 equal installments on the first of 
each month for the preceding month. 



1935 



1936 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Amherst 



MEMORANDUM OF APPOINTMENT 
(Academic Year) 



Date 



To 



Upon the recommendation of. 

I hereby appoint you to the position of 

at a salary of per year, effective on_ 

or as soon thereafter as you report for duty. 



If you accept this appointment it will be understood 
that you agree to the terms of employment as stated on the back 
of this sheet. Please acknowledge your acceptance on the en- 
closed form. 



President 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TERMS OF EMPLOYMENT 



All appointments to the staff of the University are contingent 
upon annual appropriations by the Legislature. 



Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only when 
confirmed in writing by the President of the University and 
according to the terms specified in such confirmation. 



3. Appointments to the professional staff, unless otherwise 
stated, are for one year at a time during the first three 
years of service. At the end of the third year tenure may 
be granted by the President which will be effective without 
reappointment as long as service in and to the University is 
mutually satisfactory. 



4-. The annual period of service under this appointment is for 
the academic year. 



5. Duties may be assigned to the appointee in resident in- 
struction, research, extension teaching, and/or other pro- 
grams of the University as required. 



6. Salaries are paid in 12 equal installments on the first of 
each month. 



1937 



1938 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Courses 



Student 

Attendance 

Regulations 



ROTC Policy 
for Transfer 
Students 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Educational Policies 

Council of the University and after study and discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the attached new courses of study and 
changes in the course of study. 



On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council, 



it was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 
adoption of the attached new courses of 
graduate study. 

Provost Mather said that when he came to the University, 
he found that the office of the Dean of Men apparently was em- 
powered to lower the academic grades of students as a penalty for 
absences from class. He feels that this power is wrongly placed 
and that only the instruction should determine course grades. The 
Educational Policies Council of the University has studied this 
practice and concurs with the Provost that course grades belong to 
the instructor. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
abolition of the practice of decreasing of 
grade points by the Administration to penalize 
student absences and approve adoption of the 
following attendance regulations. 

The attendance of students at all regularly scheduled 
classes at the University of Massachusetts is expected. 
No administrative control of attendance shall be exercised 
except as hereinafter provided. 

In case of illness, students are to explain their 

absences directly to their instructors. The mark of a 

student who has met the requirements of the instructor 

in making up all his work shall not be reduced because 

of absence for illness. 
V. 

"Provost Mather said that he has discussed with the ROTC 
commandant of the Armored Force and of the Air Force the problem 
of how to integrate transfer students into the ROTC program. It 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



is the feeling of the officers and of the Provost that it is a 
waste of government money to require sophomore, junior or senior 
transfer students to take the ROTC program since there is no possi- 
bility that they can complete the training required for a 
commission in less than four years. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following policy relative to ROTC training 
for transfer students: 

Students transferring from any other institution not 
offering ROTC training to the University of Massachusetts 
who qualify as full-time bona fide sophomores, juniors, or 
seniors will not be required to take basic ROTC training. 

Veterans who enroll under the above stated policy and 
for whom part or ail of the basic training requirements 
are waived should be given the discretionary right of en- 
rollment in ROTC for progress toward a possible commission. 

The committee examined the attached list of appointments, 

promotions, resignations, death and retirements for the year 

January 1 through December 31? 1953 ♦ The Provost pointed out that 

all appointments or promotions to the grade of Professor or above 

have been separately approved by the Trustees and the list of those 

below the grade of Professor is submitted for the approval of the 

Trustees in accordance with the By-Laws. It was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 

list as presented and approve the appointments 
and promotions listed therein. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12; 15 p.m. 




^ 



Secretary 



1939 



Transfer 
Students 



Appointments 

Promotions 

Retirements 



1940 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



M OKDERGBADOATE COURSE 



I 



wr*<*r 78 II (WOTCS OF AKBttL POPULATIONS. The principles of J&e^ 

f^r^m* end nethods. its goals and contributions. The 
' £E£5«X^ . the Sdy of the ortgWOS *?**■* «* 
human eenetics vill also be considered. 

.&%SULW, Zoology 53 or- «. r ir^^s-sSiT ■ 

instructor. * Credits 2 

discussion period gev weak. ■ 

.. _*- i ~~ oa cwmme of "FECIAL MlCEaBIALGHJOPS. It 1$ the. intention 
Bacteriology *«««* » -Jf £ ^ ^ of certe in groups of ..iero- 

Sg^Ls not giv< . Im^UmJt «t J*a,»ost only briefly 
Ln-iAoaad in otter -9S offered in tee aepartasnt. Bj® 

2*rt£ ^Srtal vilj cover tire ***£**> $"**g- ffi^ 
Snthetic bacteria, aotinooybe^es, ryxcfcacterla, cKUi^aobacteria 
gS^S5S*StSr-'s 4 *U$ .consist^ -U^rgM* 

d^on°fe" tions, and literature irwiewi. three credits .«U«aW 
t?Se laSand four laboratory hours per ve* are W«£- . 
1 to. lecture, /* hrs. laboratory 

Business A&Onlstration " I 3fD»t ■?«>«» LSS&Ss^ ' 

principles of income, .^on a; Oiea to indi AoualBano 

Sohesl^r the s, ,i.J5 ' -oaia tajt.lavs in sornorata 

^ooulWanci ^Accounting 61.. Crooits 3 

Su-inos. Administration 73 i 3 XI mUL IMMOWW. An laW- 

^iness Aa^.nis5.a ua l cases, of the problems 

°" . . y C . «x^ t^^iis-»'^«i Admin* station 63« creams j> 

ness. Prerequisite Indus -.a a«i AamniB^-^^ .. 

. . w ,>r- f HAFK^TINCr.' A study of problems 

kinase igg^^SjLS • r 4 interrelatSn betvoan re- 

^L^Lnning, execution - .lee program, ana market con- 
trol ftTSfcts of various marketing policies y&atoaM- 

■ siderotic* o/the c to the P*>^° f «?£?S 

aade through ft . organisms. Given in alter- 

nate years, ' 1 lecture hour .!**«"?» 

STl3-ho« "is. Prerequisite Zoology 1 and 

permission of the instTO. .. 

Pulsion of credits in E .logy ■ fed .Beekeeping from three 

(3) to two (2). 1 class hour 1-2 hour laboratory. 



£-» «Two AMn «* TTit-roduation to design and execution 
te ^^ra^^ with children in schools, 

playgrounds, sunaer camps; and for any age in recreational 
leadership and occupational therapy. Opportunity will be 
offered for vork in several of the following*, wood and leather 
work, block printing, fir. inting, etching, knotting, etc. 



adits 3 



I 



fo: 









- 



IB* 

3 credit; 



ogy 



To be >* 

■ elementar; «)• 

2-3 credits 
1953- a each alternate year. 

Ticulu-fl Plan 

,atn gj 

t3 



vear. 



2-3 credits 






xiits 



I 



x. » tS 



• 






sstesir 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST, MASSACHUSETTS 
List of Professional Appointments, Promotions, Retirements, Resignations 

January 1 - December 31, 1953 
APPOINTMENTS 

Administration 

Robert Leavitt, Executive Secretary, Associate Alumni, July 1, 1953 

Instruction 

Uerechel G* Abbott, Instructor in Forestry, September 1, 1953, $3,720 

Doris E. Abramson, Instructor in English, February 1, 1953, » 3,720 

Milton P. Baldauf, Instructor in Food Technology, Sept ember 1, 1953, $3,720 

Christians Barthe, Instructor in Romance Languages, September 1, 1953 U/3 time) 

TheodSe 2 L? Batt*, Instructor in Chemical Engineering, September 1, 1953, ^,720 

Benjamin S. 3en;jaminov, Instructor in Chemistry, September 1, 1953, U/2 time), $1,860 

Robert F. Biehler, Instructor in Psychology, September i, 1953, S3. W 

Robert M. Boland/ Assistant Professor of Music, October 16 , 1953, ttA ■***) > *,W 

Fred V. Cahill, Jr., Professor of Government, September 1, f?53, 3o,J*u 

Dan S. Collins, Instructor in English, September 1,1953, *3» 7 «° 

Richard K. Cornfoot, Instructor in KLoriculture, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), $1,860 

Edward L. Davis, Instructor in Botany, September 1, 1953, p, <f 

Seymour Epstein, Assistant Professor of Psychology, September V*953, ^,560 

Dw :s. Erlick, Instructor in Psychology, September x > 19 ?3, *3,^0 

¥i: B. Farrington, Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1953, $3,720 

en L. Field, Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 1953, |3,720 
Alnon S. Fish, Jr., Instructor in Pomology, September 1, ^>$ 3 >l%° 
Edith C. Foxbes, Instructor in Home Economics, September 1, 1953, U, wo 
Alice Georgentas, Instructor in Romance Languages, September 1, 1953, U/3 time;, 

BlchaS'Mf Gillis, Instructor in Business Administration, September 1, 19 g> |>» 720 
Sandra G. Goding, Assistant Physician, October 10, 1953 <V2 ttae). ^,940 
is c. Goldstein, Instructor in Zoology, September x, }ffi^ 2 
Peter B. Gore, Instructor in French, September 1, -953, UA ^){^ 
Mrs. Vilma V. Joa, Instructor in Russian, f^*«^ *» x ??3' i/S li kl 
Jane T. Judge, Instructor in Chemistry, October 1, Wi U/2 *^ £»* ° 1953 
H, Karlson, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, September 1,1953, 

Carolyn'h. Kendrow, Instructor in Chemistry, September 1, 1953, ^,720 
David V. Knudsen, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953, 33,720 
Henry Kratz, Jr., Instructor in German, September 1, 1953, &>'fi . . .. s *, g6o 
Lorraine D.Lavallee, Instructor in Mathematics, September 1, 1953 , (1/2 ^Jjjj' 850 
John J. Lawler, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953 U/2 time;, 

Lowell L Lingo, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1953, 

Mrs. Gertnute H. McPherson, Instructor in Sociology, September 1, 1953 (l/2 time), 
$1,860 



Appointments - 2 

Mary A. Maher, Professor and Head of Division of Cursing, October 1, 1953, $6,180 

Lewis C» Malnzer, Instructor in Government, September 1, 19^3, $3,/-^ 

J* Paul Mather, Provost, February 1, 1953, $7,980 _ 

Clair V. Naylor, Instructor in Mathematics, September 1, 1953, W,720 

August blander, Jr., Instructor in Matnematics, September 1, 1953, $3,720 

Norton H. Nickerson, Instructor in Botany, September 1, W3, *3 ,720 

to h. O'Donnell, Instructor in Education, February 1, 1953, f3,720 

Gaorga' J. O'Hara, Instructor in Civil Engineering, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), 

Mrs. Kathlrine J. Padelford, Assistant Professor of Education, September I, 1953, 

(1/3 time), $1,520 ■ ^ « 9ft 

Albert Perley, Instructor in Anlaal Husbandry, September 1, 1953, ^3,720 
Jackson J, Perry, Assistant Professor of Recreation, September 1, 1953 WZ ume;, 

Ednardo'l. Pina, Instructor in Mathematics, October 1, 1953 (lA tiflia), t930 
ward S.Pira, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, February 1, 1953, v3, ?20 
Lfred X. Powers, Instructor in Agricultural Engineering, September 1, 1953, $3,720 
s. Louise E. Rice, Instructor in Mathematics, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), 

Thomafl^dce, Assistant Professor of Geology, October 1, 1953 (1/4 time) , »A40 
Navton Y, Sobinaon, Instructor in Business Administration, September 1, 1953, $3,720 
Jerome iiothenberg, Instructor in Economics, September 1, 19 53, , $3, 720 
Howard M. Sachar, Instructor in iiistory, September 1, 1953 (1/2 time), $1>B60 

.Robert a. St. Clair, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, September 1, 

ArnoMG^'sK^ssistant Professor of Civil Engineer ing t Sft*«Jar ^ 1953, $4,560 
njamin M. Shaub, Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1953 WA «»e), W30 
S. Taubs, Instructor in Romance Languages, September 1,1953, «,^ 
I. Veum, Instructor in Romance Languages, October 5, 1953, CV3 time), $1,200 
A. Veldhaas, Jr., Instructor in Entomology, September 1, t 953 V * ^ -» 
org© P. Veidmann, Assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering, September 1, 

.omaa 0. Wilkinson, Instructor in Sociology, September 1, 1953, ^,720 
1 s. Visnloskl, Instructor in Bacteriology, September 1, 1953, $3,/«20 

EXPERIMENT STATIOH 

Allen B. Barton, Associate professor, Research, Agricultural Engineering, 

October 1, 1953, $5,220 ^ 7;>n 

Leo P. Bsninato, Instructor, Research, Veterinary Science, June *5, 1953, *3,7ZU 
Clifford S. Chater, Instructor, Research, Shade Tree Laboratory, May 18, 1953, 

Robert V. Decareau, Instructor, Research, Food Technology, May 1, 1953, $3*720 
Elmo J. fresia, Instructor, Research, Feeds and Fertilizers, Nav«abar 23, 1953, $3,720 
Pearl Kana, Instructor, Research, Home Economics, October 1, 19j>3, f>> '*" d ^ 
Eliot C. Roberts, Assistant Professor, Research, Agronomy, October 1, 1953, v4,50U 
Robert L. Ticknor, Assistant Professor, Research, Nurseryculture, December 1, 

Mildred^andtr 5 ^!, Instructor, Research, Feeds & Fertilizers, September 15, 1953, $3,720 

EXTENSION SERVICE 
Winifred I. Eastwood, Professor of Home Economics, January 1, 1953, $M 8 ° ^ 
Rosa M. Starkey, Assistant Professor of Home Economics, August 17, 1953, ^,5ou 



PSOMOTIGflS 
Instruction 



Janes K. Ferrigno, Associ^e """- «*• Pmr^olosry from Assistant Professor 
Albert E. Goss, Associate Professor of Peyenol ogy mm ass^ Professor 

Experiment Station 

Willie I. Tomlinson, Jr., Associate Professor, Research, Estomology from 
Assistant Professor 

Control Service 
Bertram Gerstan, Assistant Professor, Research, Feeds «d Fertilise fro. Instructor 

BESIGNATIONS 
Instruction 

Robert V. Allen, Instructor in Electrical ■*#*»»** ' £**£» 1 a£** 31, 1953 
Hichard Atherton, Assistant Professor of ««*«^«^ E ^f If if ^ (after leave of 
Leon A. Bradley, Head of Department of Bacteriology, May JL, 195; garner 

Roberfrio, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics, February 11, 1953 (After 

josep^^S'lnstructor in Olericulture August » 1953 
Ann B. Carlin, Assistant Professor of Education, Au §»■* ». «» 
A. George Davis, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 19,3 
Arthur Q. Dodge, Jr., Instructor in f^**^*^ » '££ 
Russell E. Dutcher, Instructor to Geology, August 31, A9W 
^g»e J. Ftonegan Instructor in Dairy Ind ustry, *£»*». £53 
William H. Fitspatri.dc, Instructor in Food Technology, Marcn jx, «?;> 

Thomas e n! e Farr, Instructor in Entomology, August 31, 1953 
Alexander M. Cruicksbank, Instructor in Canister* *»**•* »» 19W 
William ». Urimshaw, Professor of Recreation, August 31, 1953 



assignations -2 

Vernon L. *erwerda, Assistant Professor of Economics, July. 31, 1953 

Joseph Gabrys, Instructor in Civil Engineering, August 31, 1953 

EdVard D. Hall, Instructor in Chemistry, August 31, 1953 

William P. Hlggtas, Instructor in Chemical Engineering, August 31, 1953 

Ahmad H. Kfceiralla, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1953 

Frederick B. Lindstrom, Instructor in Sociology, August 31, 1953 

Marian J. Liotta, Instructor in Romance Languages, August 31, 1953 

Oscar I. Lltoff , Assistant Professor of Mathematics, August 31, 1953 

Halter B. MacGrath, Instructor in Zoology, July 31, 1953 

William I. Matthews, Instructor in Government, August 31, 1953 

Ralph G. Mitchell, Instructor in Animal Husbandry, August 31, 1953 

Valdamars Punga, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1953 

Eugene C. Putala, Instructor in Botany, August 31, 1953 

Cedric W, Richards, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering, August 31, 1953 

Alexander A. Robertson, Assistant Professor of Bacteriology, August 31, 1953 

Nathaniel M. Sage, Instructor in Geology, July 31, 1953 

ViUiar. W. Saunders, Instructor in Psychology, August 31, 1953 

Edvin K. Sehempp, Assistant Professor of Business Administration, August 31, 1953 

Oddvar Solstad, Instructor in Chemical Engineering, August 31, 1953 

Aaron J. Spector, Instructor in Psychology, August 31, 1953 

Frederick P. Stephen, Instructor in Agricultural Economics, January pL 9 1953 

Paul V. Stickel, Assistant Professor of Forestry, February 5, 1953 

Ir/ing Telling, Instructor in History, July 31, 1953 . 

Jaaeo T. Timberlake, Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, August 31, 1953 

Wallace W. Turner, Assistant Physician, June 30, 1953 

Arthur L. Wannlund, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics, August 31, 1953 

Terrenes »* Wilbur, Instructor in German, A ugust 31, 1953 

Judith legelwel, Instructor in Romance Languages, August 31, 1953 

Experiment Station 
StsDhen B. Uitchner, Professor, Research, Veterinary Science, June 30, 1953. 
A. > Lopeg, Associate Professor, Research, Food Technology, February 28, 1953 
Gladys H. ..urphy, Instructor, Research, Home Economics, August 31, 1953 
John L. Parsons, Instructor, Research, Agronomy, June 29, 1V53 
Gilbert Reising, Jr., Instructor, Research, Poultry Disease, September 30, 1953 
Richard J. Stadtherr, Assistant professor, Research, :Jurs©ryculture, September 18,1V5^ 

Control 
Joseph A. Bart, Instructor, Research, Feeds and Fertilisers, October 7, 1953 
Robert T. Vetherbee, Assistant Professor, Research, Feeds and Fertilizers, «>uly 31,1953 

Extension Service 
Anthony V. Sylstra, Professor, Extension, Poultry Pathology, February 28, 1953 
Frank Wright, Assistant Professor, Extension, Animal Husbandry, July 31, 1953 



DEATH 
George F. Pushee, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering, May 19, 1953 

RETIREMENTS 
Harold M. Gore, Head of Department of Physical Education for Men, Sept. 30, 1953 
Gay T. Klein, Extension Professor of Poultry Husbandry, August 31, 1953 
yilliam L. Machmer, Dean* January 31, 1953 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 31, 195-4, 10:30 a.m., Butterfield Dormitory 



Trustee Brett presiding 



PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Taber, 

Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 

VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

There was discussion of the recapture clause in the deed 

of sale of land to Theta Chi Fraternity. This sale occurred many 

years ago from the Trustees of the University to the fraternity. 

The fraternity is now making plans for an addition to the house and 

the Amherst Savings Bank feels that it cannot make a mortgage loan 

because of this recapture provision. The bank would be satisfied 

if the Trustees could release the fraternity from this recapture 

right to have the fraternity grant a purchase option to protect the 

University. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees rescind the 
recapture provision in the deed of sale of 
land to the Theta Chi Fraternity and in its 
place acquire a purchase option from the 
fraternity, this recommendation being sub- 
ject to the approval of the necessary legal 
documents by the Chairman of the Board and 
the approval of the Attorney General. 

Treasurer Johnson said that representatives from two out- 

standing Massachusetts landscape planning firms, Shurcliff and 

Shurcliff , and Olmsted Brothers were on the campus Monday and 

Tuesday of this week. The representatives were interviewed by the 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



Master 
Plan 



1942 



COMMITTEE 



Campus 
Plan 



Paige 



Laboratory 
Annex 

remodeling 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost, the Treasurer, the Secretary, Mr. Brehm, Superintendent 
of Buildings and Grounds, and Professors Otto and Blundell of the 
Landscape Architecture Department, 

Mr. Johnson said that the campus group almost 
unanimously favored the Shurcliff firm. 

The Trustees examined written statements prepared by 

both firms listing their qualifications and work they have done. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees request 
the Division of Building Construction 
to employ the firm of Arthur A. Shurcliff 
and Sidney N. Shurcliff to prepare a 
master plan for the campus of the Uni- 
versity with the understanding that the 
plan shall be extended to include such 
land areas as may be needed for the 
proper development of the University in 
the future. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University has available 
$22,000 for the remodeling of the old Paige Laboratory Annex. 
Paige Laboratory has been renamed Munson Hall and is now head- 
quarters for the Extension Service of the University. The annex 
in the rear is not now in use, having been recently abandoned by 
the Veterinary Science' Department. Earlier the Trustees had 
agreed to have the building remodeled for use as a mimeograph and 
multili thing room and for storage of publications of the Extension 
Service. This centralized duplicating service will take care of 
the entire campus as well as the Extension Service. 

Mr. Johnson said that originally it had been planned 
that Mr. Brehm would prepare plans for the necessary remodeling. 
However, because of a vacancy in a position of Junior Engineering 
Aide, he has been unable to have blueprints made and it now seems 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

necessary to employ outside architects. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees request the 
Commission on Administration and Finance to 
employ the firm of McClintock and Craig of 
Springfield for preparation of plans for re- 
modeling of the old Paige Laboratory Annex. 

The committee examined plans prepared by McClintock and 

Craig of Springfield for the renovation of Bovker Auditorium. The 

renovation includes enlargement of the stage and dressing room 

facilities, new wiring and lighting, new seats, new projection 

booth, and refurbishing. Also included are certain exits required 

by the Department of Public Safety. Total appropriation for this 

work amounts to $236,000. After examination of the plans and 

specifications, the committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
plans for remodeling of Bowker Auditorium 
as presented by McClintock and Craig. 

The committee then visited the new Dining Commons, 

Leach and Crabtree dormitories, and Wilder Hall. After inspection 

of the buildings, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept 
Leach and Crabtree dormitories as com- 
pleted March $X, 1954 subject to the re- 
pair or replacement of a portion of the 
basement floor in both buildings in a 
manner satisfactory to the Business 
Manager of the University. 

The committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept 
the Dining Commons as completed 
February 10, 1954- subject to correction 
of the following deficiencies to the 
satisfaction of the Treasurer of the 
University: 

1. Adjustment of refrigeration. 

2. Beplacement of ventilating panel in 
snack bar. 



1943 



Bowker 
Auditorium 



remodeling 



Leach and 

Crabtree 

Houses 



Dining 
Commons 



1944 



c 



COMMITTEE 



Wilder Hall 



C 
F 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees accept 
the installation of new lighting in 
Wilder Hall as completed in accordance 
with the plans and specifications as of 
February 19, 1954. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Secretary 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 13, 1954, 11:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



1945 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Whitznore, Provost Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The committee discussed arrangements for the Men 1 s Dormi- 
tory to be constructed by the Massachusetts Building Association 
as previously requested by the Board. Chairman Bartlett pointed 
out that the bonds were to be amortized over a period of 252 years 
with annual payments of $2.4,500 per year. The first payment is to 
be made on August 10, 1955 and would cover the year beginning 
October 1, 1955. After discussion, and with Trustee Brett excused 
from voting, it was 

VOTED: That the form of lease from The Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts to University of 
Massachusetts Building Association of a 
parcel of land for the erection of one 
student dormitory, all pursuant to Acts 
of 1939, Chapter 388, as amended or supple- 
mented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by 
Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 1948, 
Chapter I85, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414., 
by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, and by Acts 
of 1953, Chapter 356, be and hereby is 
approved as presented to this meeting; 

and that the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, 
be and hereby are authorized, in the name 
and on behalf of The Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, to execute, acknowledge and de- 
liver, in or substantially in the form pre- 
sented to this meeting, said, lease of land 
from the Commonwealth to the Association 
and to cause the common seal of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 



Men f s 
Dormitory 



1946 



COMMITTEE 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTE D: That the form of lease of one student 

dormitory by University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts pursuant to Acts of 1939, 
Chapter 388, as amended or supplemented 
by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 
194-6, Chapter 352, by Acts of 194-8, 
Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 
AM, by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, and by 
Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, said building 
to be erected by said Association on a 
parcel of land to be leased to it by the 
Commonwealth, be and hereby is approved 
as presented to this meeting; and that 
the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof be and 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on 
behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in 
or substantially in the form presented to 
this meeting, said lease of one dormitory 
from said Association to the Commonwealth 
and to cause the common seal of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

Trustee VJhitmore, as Chairman of the Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, reported on the meeting of that committee which 
took place March 31, 1954 at the University. 

The Executive Committee considered the recommendation 
from the Committee on Buildings and Grounds that the Trustees 
rescind the recapture provision in the deed of sale of land to the 
Theta Chi Fraternity and in its place acquire a purchase option 
from the fraternity. There was lengthy discussion as to how the 
University might protect its interest and at the same time provide 

a clear title so that the Theta Chi Fraternity could get a mortgage 
loan from an Amherst bank. No action was taken and it was left 
that the matter would be further explored by Chairman Bartlett's 
office. 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To request the Division of Building Con- 
struction to employ the firm of Arthur A. 
Shurcliff and Sidney N. Shurcliff to pre- 
pare a master plan for the campus of the 
University with the understanding that the 
plan should be extended to include such 
land areas as may be needed for the proper 
development of the University in the future. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To request the Commission on Administration 
and Finance to employ the firm of McClintock 
and Craig of Springfield for preparation of 
plans for remodeling of the old Paige 
Laboratory Annex, 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept the plans for remodeling of Bowker 
Auditorium as presented by McClintock and 
Craig. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED: To accept Leach and Crabtree dormitories 

as completed March 31> 1954- subject to the 
repair or replacement of a portion of the basement 
floor in both buildings in a manner satisfactory 
to the Business Manager of the University. 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To accept the Dining Commons as completed 
February 10, 1954- subject to correction of 
the following deficiencies to the satis- 
faction of the Treasurer of the University. 

1. Adjustment of refrigeration. 

2. Replacement of ventilating panel in 
snack bar. 



1947 



Master 
Plan 



Paige 

Laboratory 

Annex 



Bowker 
Auditorium 



Leach and 

Crabtree 

Dormitories 



Dining 
Commons 



1948 



COMMITTEE 



Wilder Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED ; To accept the installation of new light- 
ing in Wilder Hall as completed in 
accordance with the plans and specifica- 
tions as of February 19, 1954-. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 




Qo*^/c*-^ 



Secretary- 



Chairman 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

April 29, 1954-, 9:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Vhitmore, 
Provost Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Chairman Bartlett said that as requested at the meeting 

of the Executive Committee on April 13, I954-> his office had worked 

out the form of an agreement concerning the Theta Chi mortgage. He 

said that the agreement is satisfactory to the Amherst Savings Bank 

and that it continues to protect the interests of the University 

concerning the possible reacquisition of the Theta Chi property in 

the event it should pass from its present ownership. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED ; That this Committee approve an Agreement with 

Amherst Savings Bank designated a "Subordination 
Agreement" and in the form presented to this 
meeting •> in which the trustees agree to sub- 
ordinate the right to repurchase contained in a 
deed dated July 20, 1935 and recorded with 
Hampshire County Registry of Deeds, Book 908, 
Page 1+33 to a mortgage from Theta Corporation 
of Theta Chi Fraternity and in which Amherst 
Savings Bank agrees not to foreclose said 
mortgage without providing the trustees an 
opportunity during a period of sixty days, to 
pay the amount then due thereon and to receive 
therefor an assignment of said mortgage; that 
such Agreement, to be effective, shall be signed 
in duplicate by a majority of all of the 
trustees and may be acknowledged by any one of 
them; that the Secretary shall obtain the 
approval to said Agreement of the Governor and 
Council and of the Attorney General; and that 
the Treasurer be and he hereby is authorized 
and directed to deliver one copy of said Agree- 
ment signed, acknowledged and approved as afore- 
said and signed and acknowledged on behalf of 
Amherst Savings Bank to said bank. 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



1950 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 9:30 a.m. 




^ |ctM-|tJa~ ^^j3a^J0Cvu 



Secretary 



Chairman 



i 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts held Thursday, April 29, 1954 at 9s 00 a.m. at 
the office of Dr. Bartlett, 29-4 Washington Street, Boston, He: 



1951 



A 



Signature 



I 



Dat es April 7. 195A 



best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture. 
n least 20$ of the new funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one-third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and otter expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions should, 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaried 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years 



1950 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



I herein agree to waive 7 ■ ? ■ &&* 9$ the m ■ : of -■ 
native Cosraittee of the BotrS of Tiu. ' - I* ■ « 

the office of Br* Br.tl-U f 29$ ; * ! In&m ' ***% In ton, tee i 



195 



x^> 




Date 




I ^ 



best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture, 
At least 20$ of the nev funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one-third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and other expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions should 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaries 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years . 



1950 



1951 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice of the meeting of the 
Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts held Thursday, April 29, 1954- at 9*00 a.m. at 
the office of Dr. Bartlett, 294- Washington Street, Boston, Mass. 



Date; 






Signature 



d^tiury 



best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture. 
M least 20"? of the new funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one-third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and otter expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions shouH 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaries 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years 






1950 



f« Omai" • . I ..-L t- «? •..■ Ltgr 

of M&= ■■Michusette iv U S n --.v> ipill S9 f .;954 M 9* : -- ■ * -■» I 



&*% I J$&& // I MjL 




-> 






1951 



best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture. 
At least 20% of the new funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one- third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and other expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions should 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaried 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years 



1950 



195 



of Us '■'• : ' ' i M "" >-***■ 




• S3 



- 



._-. I II. HI ' ■!■.«< i%M ■!■■< il |1> ' i> i m I " if' ii rrt r- 1*11 W -/■-" — 



— —M>— M 



*KXt^ r,/v^N^.» 



'■o 






best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture. 
.At least 20% of the new funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one- third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and other expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions should 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaries 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years . 



6 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

April 29, 1954, 9:30 a.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT; 



Trustees Brett, Bartlett, Brown, 
Crowley, Hawes, Whitmore, Provost 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Director 
Sieling, Director Dayton, Secretary 
Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To waive reading of the call and the minutes 
of the last meeting. 

Dr. Sieling said that the United States Congress is likely 
to increase the Federal funds available for research and extension 
programs in Massachusetts possibly to the extent of $14.0,000 addi- 
tional. At the present time the University receives approximately 
$412,000 per year for research and extension from Federal sources. 
He said that he has been working since July of 1953 to determine the 
best use for these monies in support of Massachusetts agriculture. 
At least 20$ of the new funds must be used for activities in 
connection with marketing. In general the Director indicated that 
about two-thirds of the new money would be used for the employment 
of new persons in various grades and the remaining one-third would 
be used for supplies, equipment and other expenses. 

There was discussion as to whether the new positions should 
be provided for at the minimum salary rate in each grade from 
Federal funds, with the State to pay subsequent step-rate increases, 
or whether Federal funds should be committed for the average salaried 
when the employees have received step-rate increases in future years . 



1951 



Federal Funds 

additional for 
research and 
extension 



1952 



COMMITTEE 



Salaries 



Reorganiza- 
tion Plan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was the sentiment of the committee that the entire 
average cost of the salaries should be met from Federal money. 
Under the Massachusetts salary system, individuals must be hired 
at a fixed minimum salary in each grade. There are step- rate in- 
creases at the beginning of the second, third, fourth and fifth 
years and another step at the beginning of the eighth and the be- 
ginning of the twelfth years of employment. As a practical 
matter, it would not be possible for the Director to reserve 
Federal funds to take care of step-rate increases that would occur 
in the twelfth year. In practice because of normal turnover, the 
average salary might work out to be the salary rate of the third, 
fourth, fifth or sixth year. 

It was agreed that Director Sieling would check his 

present payrolls and determine where the average salary of his 

present employees now falls. If this should be in the fifth year 

or the sixth year for example, he would then plan to reserve 

Federal funds so that he could, as the new program progresses, pro- 
funds 
vide salaries for the new employees from Federal/at the fifth or 

sixth year rate. Meantime in the first year the individual would 
actually receive the minimum of his grade and the Director would 
expend the difference between the minimum salary and the amount re- 
served for future salaries for supplies, or equipment or other de- 
sirable and needed purposes. 

Provost Mather pointed out that the reorganization plan 
will probably be approved by the Legislature. The agricultural em- 
ployees involved in the reorganization plan are paid in three 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

different vays - some receive all Federal funds, some receive all 
State funds, and some receive a combination of State and Federal 
funds. However, all three' groups are State employees and the 
amounts of their salaries are fixed by the Trustees and by State 
regulations. The essence of the reorganization plan is to provide 
flexibility so that men now employed entirely on research may do 
some extension work or some teaching and a teacher or extension 
worker might do research. 

If an individua-1 now doing full time research or full 
time extension receives all Federal funds, he will not be permitted 
under Federal regulations to do part time teaching. In order to 
gain the desired flexibility, it will be necessary to redistribute 
State and Federal funds among the individuals involved and it will 
be the intent of the administration to work out, within the 
salaries approved by the Board, a distribution of State and Federal 
funds that will provide flexibility for the reorganization plan. 
Such redistribution will require approval of the Commission on Ad- 
ministration and Finance. 

After discussion, the committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the administration to accept such new 
Federal funds as may be msde available 
beginning July 1, 1954- a ^ to establish 
suitable projects for the expenditure of 
the Federal funds and to carry out the 
work so planned. 

The committee further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the establishment of such new positions as 
are needed to carry out the new agricultural 
programs with the salaries to be paid from 
Federal funds up to the normal turnover rate 
now prevailing at the University. 



1953 



1954 



COMMITTEE 



Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the administration to work out with the 
proper authorities the redistribution of 
State and Federal funds as applied to 
salaries in the University so as to pro- 
vide the flexibility needed to carry out 
both the new Federally supported programs 
and the reorganization program approved 
by the Board. 

Provost Mather and Director Sieling said that with the 

passage of the reorganization plan and the raising of salaries of 

the agricultural group who are or will be on a 12 months* basis of 

employment, it seems desirable to limit the amount of outside work 

which may be done for pay by such employees. Service in agriculture 

is different from service in other schools of the University in 

that it has been commonly regarded as a required public service 

and that it necessarily commands the whole time of the individual 

who is employed on a 12 months' basis. After discussion, it was 

VOTE D: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following terms of employment for members 
of the professional staff in Agriculture 
and Horticulture who will be on a 12 months' 
basis. 

The Provost and Director discussed generally the future 
land needs of the School of Agriculture. They pointed out that 
with the growth of the University much of the land formerly used 
for farm or experimental purposes has been encroached on by build- 
ings, and other facilities. There are two privately-owned farms 
abutting the University. One is now on the market and the other 
may be placed on the market soon. One farm has about 50 acres 
and is priced at $100,000. This farm is not especially suited for 

agricultural use but part of it could be used for orchards and all 
of it might eventually be needed for general University purposes. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The other farm contains about 44 acres and is priced at $55>000. 
It is excellent land for the purpose of vegetable growing and 
other non-orchard farm uses. 

Chairman Brett raised question as to whether the Uni- 
versity has carefully considered its land needs for farming. He 
asked whether a large amount of farming is done at the University 
just because it has been so done in the past and whether the Uni- 
versity might make greater use of private farms for research 
purposes. 

No decision was made as to the acquisition of additional 
land. The administration was requested to investigate the matter 
of land needs further and also the possibility of acquiring the two 
farms mentioned at a lower price and to report further at the 
budget meeting of the Board. 

Director Sieling said that with the development of the 
School of Engineering and the need, for access roads to the school, 
it will be necessary to move some of his present farm barns and 
service buildings. The new locations of these buildings depends 
upon the direction in which his farm lands will go. 

Chairman Brett said that the University has been a 
member of the New England Cranberry Cooperative Group since 1911. 
This cooperative has serviced the University's bog at wareham, has 
operated it, provided labor, harvested the berries and paid the 
University as a member of the cooperative for the harvested 
berries less the amount expended in servicing the bog. Income from 
the group has amounted to a total of $25,000 or $30,000 over the 

past five years. Payments are made both in cash and in stock or 



1955 



Cranberry 
Industry 



1956 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

stock dividends. The New England Cooperative has now been taken 

over by the National Cranberry Association, also a cooperative, 

and it is questionable as to whether the University should continue 

the harvesting and servicing arrangements. Proper State procedures 

call for inviting bids on the open market to concerns who would 

harvest the crop from the vines and pay cash for the berries. 

There are a number of independent contractors who can do this work. 

A cooperative (and there is only one) cannot bid on a competitive 

basis. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees discontinue 
arrangements with the National Cranberry 
Association and in the future have its cran- 
berry crop harvested by inviting bids from 
independent contractors. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12: -45 'p'Tn, 




Secretary 



wr ■> H7 






MEMOR&OT-I OF APPCOTIME^ 
(Calendar Year) 



To 



-- :■- - .—':.- ■'■-■ 



Tf^ ~~ MESM -~ 



Upon the recommendation ox_ 1im r — , ; — mMm ^ J . 

X hereby appoint you to the position o£ 

at a salary of per y9ar, effective on 

or as soon thereafter as you report for duty 



If you accept this appointment it will be underBtood that you agree to 
the terms of employment as stated on the back of this sheet, Please 
acknowledge your acceptance on the enclosed form* 



i^ti_j_a mm _ 



President 



am 



are contingent 
upon annual appropriat r the -s* 

2* Appointment to a salaried position is authoritative only when 
confirmed in writing by the President of the University and 
according to the teuss specified in such confirmation* 

3* Appointments to the professional staff, unless otherwise stated* 
are for one year at a time during the first three years of ser- 
vice. At the end of the third year tenure may be granted by the 
President which will be affective without reappointment as long 
as service in and to the University is mutually satisfactory* 

4» The annual period of service under this appointment is 12 months* 
with vacation of one month allowed in each full year of service. 

5* Duties may be assigned to the appointee in resident instruction, 
research,, extension teaching, and/or other programs of the Uni- 
versity as required. 

6. Salaries are paid in 12 equal installments, on the first of each 
month for the oreceiiag month* 



f> 



Sxcept under circumstances approved by the President, the follow- 
ing limitations pertaining to professional employment outs3.de 
your . lar work will app] 

a« You may not accept outside assignments or employment 
>r pay within the Commonwealth in any capacity re- 
lated to your professional employment* 

be You may be permitted under specific arrangements 
approved by the Dean to accept employment or assign- 
ments for pay outside the CoaEsomfsalth in the capacity 
related to your professional employment* 

c. As a public service responsibility^, you may accept 
without pay or perquisite* and with the approval of 
the Dean* offices in agricultural organizations 
lated to your professional assignment* 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 11, 1954- * 10:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Trustee Desmond presiding in the 
absence of Chairman Brett 



PRESENT : 



Trustees Desmond, Bartlett, Miss 
Buxton, Crowley, Mrs. McNamara, 
Provost Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Provost Mather explained the procedure by which curricula 
changes are brought about. Proposed new courses or changes in old 
courses are initiated at the department level, are discussed by 
special committees in each school of the University and are then 
passed upon by the University Course of Study Committee. 

"Where policy matters are involved, the programs are re- 
viewed by the Educational Policies Council of the University. 
After that the programs must receive approval of the Provost and 
President before being brought to the Tr .s. 

Changes in the graduate curriculum are also initiated in 
the departments, are acted upon by the Graduate School Council and 
must receive the approval of the Provost and President. 

The committee then discussed a series of curricular 
recommendations brought to the Trustees through this process. 
After questions and discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

following new courses and changes in courses. 



1957 



New 
Courses 



1958 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CKAKGS 



CHANGE 



CHANGE 



CHANGE 
HEW 



NEW 



That the Matheaatics Department be pitted to e^ertaent 
vdth six sections In a freshen Mathematics cwrae tor 
Ubera Arts majors for one year beginning September 1954, 
with course descriptions as follows: 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Hatheaat: :. Basic eet>- 
theoretic and aromatic concepts, number systems snd^ 
equations, A study of elementary functions, algebraic 

and ty the methods of analytic ge^etxy, 

Mathematics 2. Introductory > atiej 1 J J"*"* 

course intended for' students whose curri alls foi 

lust one year of Mathematics. A cent ion oi 

fetheflatlce 1, including topics f*oa tba calcul . 
statistics and mathemati< 

Mathematics 4. Introductory Ibthtetiea X¥,vA c 

tic* of Mathematics 1 for those stud,; lending to Take 

£rfh2r cou^Ss in Mathematics. Analytic geometry ana 

trigonometry* 

That Undaeaoe Architecture majors 1* Pitted to trie. Che 
ffollowTby Botany X rather than a &11 year of Chealstry. 

That Government 25 be redefined to read as fallow. Govern 
251 and II A'iEFICAK 30VEKHSE* "3 study of principles, 
Swinery, dynamics, and problems of America Government. 

That Government 52 3DP0PBAK OOTHDEM b **°^ ,^f ^t^ions 
nmoPEAr GOVSEiSiSlST. "A study of the politic* ana institutions 
Kit Srttein, France, O.S.S.R. and other Biropen count . 

That Government 28 STATE USD LOCAL become Government W STATS 

S&nMOT. "A study of state politics, organisation and 

functions, with emphasis on the role ct the state U our 

Federal systas" to alternate withi Government 64 MGb^IPAL 

0OV3RHM3ET. 

That Government 67 become Government 70 for schedule convert >. 

Government 73. COMPAFATIVE QOVEHK-BHT "A functional anal: 
of contemporary zovwasonts with special attention to toe 
Contracture, and dynamics of political parties. Pre- 
requisite Government 26. 

Government 76 PUBLIC OPINION IE POLITICS "A study of opinion 
2S cZunxLtion as aspects of the political **»«*«* 
«nh fia is uron communication through mass raeoj jjcaainati-- 
o?*hf relationsbetvoen mas, >dee 

nolitical institutions and' •. 



9 



._, 



ra x F 56 . BKGKES::IKG ECOUO.ff. This course includes the study 

™ J !^«ffor cosoaxlson of alternatives in engineering 

If^l^e^S laini-n^ cost points, evaluation of pro- 
projects, twea,. even * ny of operations, the evaluation 

posals for new aotavxtie, # ecro«^o ^ typical ite:ns of en- 

*>*• «»M4(> srtivitieF* the o ana n^ *- ,A "'•* , , 

of puolic "CW.yii.1 ~ * -cuiJaart, manufacturing lot sizes, 

SS^-Sb^S^lS^ Motion ana replac^nt of 
"future, and -.achiner.. 3 i«»». Prereoui S i*es Ec^25, ? 

Math. 6 or Math. 29* 



"GE 



CHAHGE 



_ , «j witipp _ for ron-raaiors - credit o© 

That Hoiae Economics oh RUTRi *!•-.& - ior r.oa ^J^" 

increased fro .a 2 credits to 
Same catalogue v/rite-up. 

,,_ „^, TC ,„ U .. , .* w u-r o\t". t now a 3 credit course 
That Hone Economics 60 HOJSaJwL-; RUI*ija.i, nov. a v ~ 

be changed to two 2 credit courses as follows i 

An k^'ct-v-m --. Ff TrF4EFT. ^ study of selection, c*..r •, and . 
Home Sc* 60 HJuDt^-L^ i«*..u-r»i£»»* . » D ** - TZ^i -»-irr-T -l«s in- 

operation of household o,,ai x, f ,t ana the **■»££ ^""eluded? 
volved. Actual wwk vith equipment an, fielo trips .*. £««* 
1 clasr Lour, 1 3-hour laboratory 

Mom- Fc 61 SEHONSTIUTIJ!! TECHK1CUES. Emphasis is given to the 
nooses L tecSicues of oeaonstaition both in prepare 01 
Itod ana the use of equip-eat, vith application to teacnx.g, ex- 
tension, am business. 2 2-hour laboratory, Prereo.uisi „ee^ ^ 
Hoae Ec. 30 and 51* 

-i , 4n wHrriHt?J3 OF hhTSIG-\l GEOGEAPKY, A systematic study 

iin-ral resources and their effects upon mankind. The geo^rapme 
relationships to land forms will be stressed. ^^ ^ 

3 class hours, 

NEW Food Technology 93- (11) Sensor/ Evaluation Hettute. -"££* 

, .*«_ t-, em---!-, <nea*ureaents in the evaluation una accepv-iw-e 
Stole S\~nf their statistical i^rpre^on; 
teste, odor, color, and texta asureaento; application to ,00.. 
Quality control and grading. Open to seniors on,,. 
1 Cias 1 2-hour laboratory .ercod tredix 4 

,, trT \ rm,- Fan Forests- A 

NEW Forestrv 6«; ill;, tne iiana^s .,_„„+ -~, 

■* f ** ?r °f Cti ° 4X^1 et c improve 

as tedvith f arm € *Ue. SUyicultur d ..ex. .o a . f 

woo ality ^ increase cuantityj the measurement o ^ 
wooci qud.jj.fcj! „. + ~ c . rhP crtwine. measure- vent, and use oi 

volumes and growtn rate*>S ^ne gracing, ■ wa ^ i » 

forest products. 0->en to □ jors only. ... ~ 

2 Class hours; 1 4-hour laboratory ^reu:xo j 



9 



CHANG Animal Hushs ire periods and 2 2-hour 

laboratory ods and stud* jeive 4. credits. It is 

re >d accor- follow- 

iescri ed change the sauie course will 

be taught over two r otal Lours but 
earning 6 credits* Heretofore^ the student received only 4- 

credits for 6 credits worth of effort. This 1 has 

reviewed by the School of Agri are ai rticuxture Course of 

Study Cones ie, and scpjtq v i vote of Heads of Departs 
of the School, 

AnijiK- isbandry 78 (II) Dairy Cattle Production, - This 
is rbensi aufse covering £ ,es of dairy cattle i 
milk production ffordf s solution 

to the economic, nutritional^ genet: nd oanagerial problems 
concen dairyin; 

2 Class Hours | 1 2-hour laboratory period Credit 3 

CHANGE restry t\ Anatcsay and Identification, - To Forestry 25 . 

t±on» 

Forestry 5 hotogxam ietry. - To Forestry 71. 

Aerial Photogrs 

CHANGE Elec ineering 91 from first semester to second vitb 
change in number -rite-up as follows, 

E.E. 90, (II) SEP. DANISMS X. - ,:.dy of the !>,sic types of 
error- sensitive c . srtional, derivative* and 

integral controllers; trans -lor and frequency response; 
corrective lethods; criteria for satisfactory operation; practical 

mechanical : - 

3 Class hours; 1 Labor:; period 

Prerequisite, Electrical En lanical r- 

ing 85 . Credit A 

Electri 82 f st sa jester* ' i 

credit ;e in ' be- 

up as f 

'. 
Poi of 

elec ; 
of c.ri 
selsy 

1 3-1" perio 

Preroqu: mgLn 

Electrical Engineer: ) fro 



1 



SEW 



E. E. 73 SPECIAL PEDJBCTS. A laboratory course, < a9J°oi «»•» 
with a selected technical elective (as approved by .the sto- 
£&. £)« advisor), in which the student carries outa 
«tudv or yroject of Articular interest to hisseli, vita a 
S«S of^iSrvision, and wherein he is expectea to learn 
" independent work! A written report is require*, at the 
conclusion of the project. 

1 3-hour laboratory period. per week. n-*rn+ 1 

Prero^SBite, suiteble technical elective concurrents Creo.it 1 

Psychology $2. That clinical Psychology be given as two one- 
hour lecture periods plus one two-hour laboratory insxead of 
the three one-hour lecture periods as ax present* 

Speech 62 ADVANCED EADIO PRODUCTION An advanced casein 
teoadcastln« to orovide practice in preparing and proaucing 
radio talks^ radio plays and documentary orograas. 
2 class hears X 2-hour laboratory Credit 3 

Prerequisite Speech 61o 

It was 

VOTED. To recoiamend t.at the Trustees approve the following ^ate 

—"■^ new graduate courses in Sociology. Courses 

Sociology 200 SPECIAL FHttXB*. - A special project in 
SStf Sociology which may serve in lieu of thesis* . 

Prerequisite Sociology 179, or equivalent. trsdl* >~o 



CHANGE 



SEW 



SEW 



Sociology 298. II^,P*:SHIP. - ^pervise^ te n u na pmeUce 
in the administration of a state correct^ tosUtutioaor 
organization. Students chosen for this training^wili serve 
with one of the following faun's Reformatory f^^ham). 
Men's Reformatory (Concord), the Bureau of Classification {De- 
partment of Correction), Youth Service Board (Department of 
Correction). The United Prison Association (Boston) ♦ A mini- 

^Tf U tUrie Snths U0-hour v^cs) *%«^^^4STo^ 
talcs place the su^aer following completion ox trie major .art oi 

the student 1 s course work. r~edlt 3 

Prerequisites Sociology 176, 2U, 217. ^ eaiL * 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Mather said that he has had a committee studying 

the curriculum of the Department of Physical Education for Men. 

One of the purposes of this department is to train teacher coaches 

for secondary schools. The present curriculum, however, is such 

that graduates of the program are not acceptable in most school 

systems outside of Massachusetts. With the present increase in 

school population, it is imperative that the University revitalize 

this program and do its share in the preparation of well trained 

teacher coaches. The new program as developed by the department 

.has been studied carefully by the University Course of Study 

Committee and if adopted the graduates will be acceptable in states 

with the highest standards in this field. The number or credit 

hours for graduation would be increased from the present 120 to 14-9- 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
proposed curriculum (copy attached) in the 
Major for Physical Education for Men with 
the understanding that the proposed electives 
in the schedule be used for courses outside 
the Division of Physical Education. 

Provost Mather recalled that the Trustees had voted to 

approve a Division of Nursing and had authorised the administration 

to take steps to set up a curriculum in Nursing which would meet 

the highest standards of this profession. On May 15, 1953 the 

Trustees appointed Miss Mary A. Maher to head the Division of 

Nursing and since that time Miss Maher has been working with the 

various schools and departments of the University, with hospitals, 

with nurses training schools and with the various persons and 

associations who have a voice in nurse training and accreditation 

of nursing programs. 



1959 



Physical 

Education 

Courses 



Nursing 
Program 



1960 



COMMITTEE 



Master of 
Science in 
Agricultural 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Her program for nursing is now ready for action by the 
Board. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the attached new program for nurses: 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the following new graduate program lead- 
ing to the degree Master of Science in 
Agricultural Engineering, requirements 
for the degree to be as follows: 

I- The credit requirements as prescribed 
by the Graduate School, but at least 
21 semester hours will be taken in 
departments of the School of Engi- 
neering. 

2. Mot more than 3 semester hour credits 
shall be allowed for the thes: 



3. At least 12 semester hours shall be 
obtained from courses of the 200 
series exclusive of the thesis. 



The curriculum is to consist of a Core 
and selected courses in support of the 
major investigation. The Core shall 
consist of the thesis, seminar, and 12 
semester hours of other courses listed 
below: 



*^ 



Agr. Engr- .241 Cci " / " ^ r3,e 

.Sngr, 292 adaar 

Following is ascription of each of ttie ntftf ooutbm in the pv®~ 
wa leading to the abater of Sciense in Agricui^ peering* 

UmlorxBl qc »*«* investigation. Credit 4 

■■■. t>» - Credit 

Am. Ensr, ??6 B {II*. ADVANCED AGHOJLTUBAL MACHItiEK IG»i Stress 
JSSy^ pSriodi », and shook leadings, as related to design 

^SScul?ural machinery. Iha ma s al definition of Ullage tool 

Srf! Dynamics of suspension devices, automatic release equipment, 

aad hydraulic systems* -reait i 

■♦•requisite,, Agr* Engr. 17 

Agr, Ef >, AGBICUI KSXKGi' Heat , ,^^^ n * 

ard- » in 'date concentrating agricultural 

productsf Crf.t£ Sktua .^ate, fermentation, respira- 

tion, and equilibria noistura content, as they affect the processes 
and the products. The effects of lacdlfied atmosphere, adsorbents, 

and daasieanta* The application of insirume:, id control. 
Prerequisite, Agr. Engr. 173 Cl * jit ^ 

A ng r . 25C OPERATIONS HI A * , Machine rate© 

•; ling of crops, 

co ,,,. hedulea 

ir it layout and equipment for procf ; and 

stora-e* &iaxg remsnts altei methods oi processing. 

lisite, ^ev ion of Ii or wear* j 

Agr. Engr. 2 I), « fAK)B ^ L0W IW AGEI - 

BOILDIi: : ' l0W ' ? h !° ry to ^l!^ 

and vao : ® b9t *»**"*- 

1: or ^roduc aation W 

prod lc and 

reopi Ch« applies t>ro1 ^ „... 

p 2 credit; ^ 

Agr* En 

structural -he dew re ** 

ie us* of building mteris tiings *»?& 

ad creatressed companen- iiw dm of the jctura. The 
of structural factors in the orol of anviionwsat. 

Prerequisite, ^gr, En f : 3 -reaii J 



. 1 






%QX&gJ&J&£$l» Professor and Head" of Husk, for on© year 
at half pay beginning September 1, 1954 "to complete voxifc 
on doctorate. 

2. M^JI^J^Ml, Professor of Lanascapa Architecture, 
for one semester at full pay beginning September 1, 1954 
to visit leading nurseries of the United States for the 
propose of observing sanageaant and cultural practices as 

a basis for preparing a publication on the nursery bisiness. 

3. MmkJUmsm^ Professor of noriculture at the 
Valtham Field Station, for one semester at full pay be- 
ginning in February of 1955 to. complete vork for the Ph.D. 

degree, 

4. Zma^R^Mm* Assistant Professor of Ch^cal Baginaering, 
for one year at half pay beginning September x* 1954 to cou- 
plets doctor 1 ' s degree. 

5* J&_-^^ m ju£$_-& Assistant Professor of Home Economics, for on* 
semester at full pay beginning February 1955 to study at the 
Harvard School of Public Health in Nutrition and Maternal and 
Child Health.* 

6. m^ga^J^L^ Assistant Professor of History, for one 
semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 to complete 
dissertation for the doctor 1 s &®gr®Q* 

7. & X gbL&Ji&& Professor of Business Administration, for one 
semester at full pay beginning Sepx-efcber 1, 1954 to bring 
doctoral thesis up to date and prepare it for publication* 

8. mg£ipj|3L^^ H *^ ° f J)epartaent of Botany, for one 
semester at full pay beginning September 1, 19^4 for advanced 
studs'- in plant physiology. 

9- M3sr_.»u ik2ftl3-&* Associate Professor of Agricultural Engi- 
neering/ for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1955 to visit various schools and research centers in archi- 
tecture and engineering throughout the country for study* 

10. &^_U^_f__£> Heaa of the department of Psychology, for one 
semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 for research 
sad study in the field of ■ experimental abnormal behavior. 

11. Sargent Bussell, Assistant Professor of Agricultural Economics, 
ft^eTSestSr at full nay beginning February of 1955 to work 
on doctor's degree at North Carolina .State College. 

12. $m^~£*~£Z&£ l S&3&? Associate Professor of Physiology, for on© 
semester at full pay beginning February of 1955 for study at 
the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia* 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost Mather said that with the present demand for more 
teachers in elementary and secondary schools, the University has 
been considering means by which it could conduce more people to 
enter this field. He believes that students who major in Liberal 
Arts but who did not prepare for teaching might be interested in 
attending Graduate* School for one year to take special courses in 
Education as well as to do graduate work in a subject-matter de- 
partment. As candidates for a new degree Master of Arts in Teach- 
ing, they would be required to earn a total of 36 credits, 6 more 
than is required for other masters degrees. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the offering of a new degree Master of 
Arts in Teaching. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees elect the 
following former members of the staff to 
emeritus status: 

Lorin E. Ball - Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education, Emeritus. 

"Frederick A. McLaughlin - Associate Pro- 
fessor of Botany, Emeritus. 

Bay M. Kg on - Professor of Horticulture 
and Head of the Waltham Field Station, 
Emeritus 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 



1961 



Master of 
Arts in 
Teaching 



Emeritus 
Professors 



Lorin E. Ball 



Frederick A. 
McLaughlin 

Bay M. Koon 



1962 



COMMITTEE 



Robert E. 
Young - 
promotion 



Fred P. 
Jeffrey - 

appointment 



Lotta 

Crabtree 
Fellowship 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees promote 

Robert E. Young from Associate Professor 
to Professor of Olericulture at the 
"\„ltham Field Station effective April 1, 
1954- at the salary then prevailing for 
that grade. 

To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Fred **. Jeffrey now Head of Poultry De- 
partment to Associate Dean of the School 
of Agriculture and Director ox the 
Stockbridge School effective October 1, 
1954 s-t the salary then prevailing for 
that grade. 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees add the 
Librarian to the Educational Policies 
Council of the University. 

* 

On the recommendation of Provost Mather, it was 

T ;o m ED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following sabbatical leaves subject 
to availability of funds J 

On the recommendation of ^rovost Mather, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
award of Lotta Crabtree fellowship in 
the amount of $2,000 to Mr. Ralston B. 
Read, Jr. for the college year 1954--55- 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p»m. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
June 5, 1954-> 10:00 a.m., Butterfield House, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, Brett, 

Cashin, McDermott, Whitmore, Presi- 
dent Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
' Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED: To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Haigis recalled that the Executive Committee of 
the Board had voted to approve an agreement with the Amherst 
Savings Bank designated as a "Subordination Agreement" so that the 
Theta Chi Fraternity might obtain a mortgage loan from the Amherst 
Savings Bank. When Theta Chi bought its land from the University- 
years ago, the Trustees put a recapture provision in the deed of 
sale and the fraternity has been unable to obtain a loan from the 
Amherst Savings Bank while this agreement is in full force. 

The action of the Executive Committee in subordinating 
this agreement required the approval of the Attorney General and 
the Governor and Council. However, the Assistant Attorney General 
has submitted an informal opinion that the Trustees cannot enter 
into such a subordination agreement. 

In view of this, the Theta Chi Fraternity now requests 
that the Trustees of the University take their mortgage for 
$40,000 so that they might build an addition to their chapter house 
The property of the fraternity as it now stands has been appraised 
at $.60,000 and the addition will make the property more valuable. 



1963 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



1964 



COMMITTEE 



Chi Omega 
Sorority 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dr. Bartlett expressed the opinion that the legality of a 

subordination agreement should be explored further before the 

Trustees consider a mortgage loan to Theta Chi Fraternity. After 

discussion, it vas 

VOTED: To postpone action on the Theta Chi re- 
quest until a later meeting of the Board. 

And it was 

VOTED,; To authorize and request the Chairman of 
the Board to request an opinion from the 
Attorney General on the legality of the 
proposed subordination agreement with the 
Amherst Savings Bank relative to the 
Theta Chi property. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that B. 0. Moody of the First 

National Bank of Amherst has reported to him in a letter dated 

April 30, 1954 that the Chi Omega Sorority has completed its final 

mortgage payment and the mortgage should be discharged. The 



committee 



VOTED: 



To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. 
Johnson, to discharge the mortgage on 
Chi Omega Sorority - payment having 
been made in full. 



The meeting was adjourned at 10:50 a.m. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILD- 
INGS AND GROUNDS 

June 28, 1954, llsOO a.m., President's Office, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairmen Whitmore, presiding. 

PRESENT; Trustees Whitmore, Taber, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Business Manager Ludden, 
Secretary Burke. 

This meeting was adjourned to the Hotel St&tler at 
11:00 a.m., on Tuesday, June 29, and resumed with the following 
Trustees: 

PRESENT : Trustee Whitmore, Chairman; Trustees Brett, T a ber, 
President Mather, Secretary Burke. 

It was 

VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and reading of ■ 
the minutes of the last meeting. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mr. Fred Dole, Deputy 
Commissioner of Public Works, is coming to the campus in July for 
conference relative to the new state highway bypass at the western 
edge of the campus. He said that Mr, Dole seems favorable to the 
state providing accesses end connecting roads to the campus. 

Trustee Whitmore urged that the master plan be prepared as 
soon as possible, especially as to traffic, so that proper 
approaches to the new highway can be planned. Mr. Johnson said 
that Shurcliff & Shurcliff has not yet received a contract from the 
Public Building Commission but the firm is ready to proceed with 
the master plan as soon as the contract is completed. 

Trustee Whitmore asked whether the Treasurer had further 
information concerning the possibility of land acquisition to the 
south and east of the athletic field. Treasurer Johnson reported 
that he had contacted Mrs. Margaret Wright, owner of the largest 



1965 



Master 
Plan 



Land 
Purchase 



1966 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

portion of this land, and she has written that if she were willing 

to sell her asking price would be $10,000 for about three acres. 

The Committee then discus ed the possibility of acquiring 

the Montague property, consisting of about forty-seven acres. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mr. Winthrop Dakin, whose residence 

is north of the Montague property, is interested, in buying the 

Montague land and donating most of it to the University. It is 

possible, however, that Mrs. Montague's price may be more than Mr, 

Dakin feels that he could pay, if he is to make a partial donation, 

and after discussion, it was 

VOTED? To recommend that an item of $25,000 be placed in 
in the budget for the purchase of land with no 
stipulation as to what lands were to be purchased. . ' 

The Committee next discussed the Matuszko farm of about 
fifty acres of excellent agricultural land, priced at $50,000 to 
$60,000. Inquiry has been made to see if the Matuszkos will sell 
their property without the buildings. It appears now that they 
wish to sell the whole parcel including buildings and will not sell 
the buildings or land separately. 

Trustee Whitmore suggested that the master plan should 
provide advice as to the need of the University to acquire the 
Matuszko land. He suggested that the Committee make no recommenda- 
tion on acquisition of the Wright property until the master plan 
has been completed. In the meantime he asked Treasurer Johnson to 
let Mrs, Wright know that the University will probably not wish to 
buy her land this year, but would like to get assurance if possible 
that she will not sell to others without giving the University 
first chance. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather reported that the University received an 
appropriation of $10,000 in the supplementary budget under 03 for 
the employment of an architectural coordinator as recommended by 
the Governor. The Committee discussed various architectural firms 
with the thought that a number of them might be invited to come to 
the campus and report how they would proceed if employed as 
architectural coordinator, 

« 

After discussion it was 

VOTED; To recommend that the Board of Trustees invite the 
following firms to submit proposals so that the 
Board might later select one firm as architectural 
coordinator: 

1. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

2. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson, Abbot of Boston 

3. McGinnis & Walsh of Boston 

4. Colletti Brothers of Boston 

5. Cram & Ferguson of Boston 

6. Leland & Larson of Boston 

7. Shurcliff & Shurcliff of Boston 

The Committee considered a capital outlay program for the 

University for the next five years and 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the 
following capital outlay program. (See attached) 

The Committee discussed architects for certain projects 

for which appropriations have been made and for studies for certain 

of the buildings requested in the first year of the capital outlay 

program. After discussion it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees select 
architects as follows: 

1. For fire and safety alterations in the amount of 
$72,000 

a. Alderman & MacNeish 

b. Bradley & Gass 

c. McClintock & Sprague 



1967 



Architectural 
Coordinator 



Capital 
Outlay Program 



Architects 



1968 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. For vegetable gardening building and greenhouses 

a. Clinton Goodwin of Haverhill 

b. Maloney & Tessier of Springfield 

c. William B. Colleary of Centerville 

3. For study of additions to the Library and con- 
struction of Liberal Arts Building - with no 
priority order indicated - 

a. Shepley & Bulfinch of Boston 

b. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe & Dean of Boston 

c. McGinnis & Walsh of Boston 

In the event that it becomes necessary to select a new 
architect for the Public Health Building, the Committee recommends 
that the Board of Trustees approve architects as follows: 

1. Cram & Ferguson of Boston 

2. Leland and Larson of Boston 

3. Colletti Brothers of Boston 



The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 




cretary 



June 25, 1954 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM FOR FISCAL YEARS 1956-1960 

Univ. of Mass, 
Bldg. Association 
Priority Project State Funds Funds 

1956 

1. (Addition to Library (#1)* $2,000,000 $ 
(Liberal Arts Classroom 2,000,000 

Building* 

2. Addition to Power Plant 1,000,000 

(Including Boilers, 
Generators & Utility 
Additions, etc.) 

3. Vegetable Gardening Bldg. 250,000 

& Greenhouses 

4. Completion of Dormitory #13 600,000 

for 231 Men ; 

5. Dormitory #14 for 400 Men . 1,000,000 



$5,250,000 $1,600,000 

^Because of the close physical relationship of these two projects, 
they should be studied together, and if architecturally desirable, 
might be constructed as adjoining buildings. 



The projects for 1957-1960 are subject to further study. 

1957 

1. Science Building (Biological 03,500,000 

Sciences, Geology, Botany, 
etc. ) 

2. Garage & Service Bldg. for Pit. 500,000 

3. Addition to Food Technology 500,000 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory 250,000 

(replace Fisher) 

5. Dorm'. #15 for 155 Women 350,000 

6. 1st Pt. Dorm. #16 for 145 Men 350,000 



$4,750,000 $ 700,000 



.'"1 4 . 



Priority Project 

1958 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 

State Funds 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 
8. 

9. 



1. 
2. 

3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 

7. 



1. 
2, 

3. 
4. 

I: 

7. 



Infirmary- 
Natural Resources Building 
School of Education and Practice 

School Building 
Adds. & Impts. to Utilities 
Poultry Lab, & Plant Buildings 
ROTC Armory and Classrooms 
Engineering Shops 
Complete Dorm #16 for 216 Men 
Dormitory #17 for 184 Women 



1959 

Addition to Dining Commons 
Addition to Physics Building 
Engineering Building 
Gymnasium, Phys. Ed. for Men 
Animal Industries Building 
Dormitory #18 for 437 Men 
Dormitories #19 & #20 for 363 Women 



1960 

Bus. Admin. Classroom Bldg. 
Horticulture & Agronomy Labs. 
Administration Building 
Auditorium & Music Center 
Farm Building Replacements 
Dormitory #21 for 471 Men 
Dormitory #22 for 329 Women 



$1,000,000 

i,ooo; ooo 

1,500*000 

300,000 
100,000 
500,000 
600,000 



1,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
3,000,000 
500,000 



U of M 
Bldg. Assoc 
Funds 



550,000 
450,000 



|5 3 000,000 $1,000,000 



$ 750,000 

1,250,000 

1,500,000 

1,500,000 

800,000 

1,100,000 
900,000 



$5,300,000 $2,000,000 



1,250,000 
850,000 



$7,000,000 $2,100,000 



TOTAL - FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM 



$27,800,000 V7, 400, 000 



Notes; 

1. All project estimates include furnishings, equipment, site 
improvements, architects 1 fees and other costs of the project. 
These estimates are subject to change based upon cost estimates 
made by architects and engineers T studies. 

2. All buildings are based on needs established by projected 
estimates of enrollments revised to conform to a gradual growth 
of the University. These enrollment figures show that an appro- 
priation is needed in the fiscal year indicated to complete the 
building for use as the student body reaches the size where 
existing space is overcrowded. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



\ 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF JOINT TRUSTEE COMMITTEES ON 
AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE AND COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY & PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 29, 1954, ll;SO a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Trustee Brett, presiding, 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Brown, Boyden, Bartlett, Crowley, 
Hawes, Whitmore, Mrs. McNajiiara, Miss Buxton, 
President Mather, Secretary Burke. 

It was 

VOTEpJ To dispense with reading of the call and reading of 
the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Mather reviewed the procedure followed in the 
selection of a candidate for Head of the Waltham Field Station. He 
said that Dean Sieling had appointed a selection committee consist- 
ing of the heads of departments at the University who have members 
of their departments located at the Waltham Field Station. This 
group consisted of Clark L # Thayer, Head of the Department of 
Floriculture; Kenneth L. Bullis, Head of the Department of 
Veterinary Science; H. Sidney Vaughan, Extension Head, Agriculture; 
Grant B. Snyder, Head of the Department of Olericulture; 
Theodore T. Kozlowski, Head of the Department of Botany; and 
Warren D. Whitcomb, Research Professor of Entomology. This com- 
mittee met on January 15 and outlined the qualifications needed for 
the position of Head of the Waltham Field Station. Later the com- 
mittee met with the various farm groups with an interest in the 

work of the Waltham Field Station, and these groups agreed on the 
specifications for the position as drawn up by the committee. 

Before considering outside applications, the committee considered 

all members of the agricultural faculty at Waltham at at Amherst 



1969 



Head, 
Waltham 
Field 
Station 



1970 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and agreed on the names of several men who might fill the position 
competently . 

The committee sent letters to various agricultural deans 
inviting nominations. Dr. John R. Havis and another candidate 
were interviewed by all members of the committee and received their 
unanimous approval. The other candidate seemed to have slightly 
better qualifications than Dr. Havis and was offered the position. 
However, after a visit to Amherst he decided that he was not 
interested, and the President now recommends, with the unanimous 
approval of the selection committee, the appointment of Dr. John R. 
Havis as Head of the Waltham Field Station. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED ? Unanimously to recommend the Trustees appoint 
Dr. John R. Havis as Head of the Waltham Field 
Station, effective July 1, 1954. 

The meeting was adjourned at twelve o'clock. 




retary 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 29, 1954, 12:00 M«, Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden, presiding. 

PRESENT ! Trustees Boyden, Crowley, Mrs. McNaraara, Miss 
Buxton, Bartlett, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke. 

It was 

VOTED t To dispense with reading of the call and reading 
of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Mather introduced the names of seven members 

of the faculty for promotions either to the grade of professor or 

head of department and outlined the qualifications and experience 

of each individual. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; Unanimously to recommend that the Board of Trustees 
approve the following promotions to be effective 
September 1, 1954: 

Arthur E. Niedeck - promotion from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Speech. 

William G. O'Donnell - promotion from Associate 
Professor to Professor of English. 

Elmer C. Osgood - promotion from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Stanley C. Vance -= promotion from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor of Industrial Administration. 

Lawrence S. Dickinson - promotion from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Agrostology. 

E. Ernest Lindsey - promotion from Professor to 
Head of Department of Chemical Engineering. 

William H. Weaver - promotion from Professor to 
Head of Department of Mechanical Engineering. 



1971 



Promotions 



1972 



COMMITTEE 



Bates, 
Maurice E. 



Winterfield, 
Roland V. 



New 
Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon the written request of Maurice E. Bates, the Com- 



mittee 



VOTED ; Unanimously to recommend that the Trustees approve 
his transfer from Head of the Department of 
Mechanical Engineering to full Professor in the 
Department of Mechanical Engineering effective 
September 1, 1954. 

Upon the recommendation of President Mather, the Com- 
mittee 

VOTED t Unanimously to recommend that the Board of 

Trustees appoint Dr. Roland W. Winterfield as 
Research Professor of Veterinary Science 
effective August 1, 1954. 

Upon the recommendation of the University Course of 

Study Committee and of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : Unanimously to recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following new courses of study; 

Home Economics 4- - Nutrition and Food Preparation. 
This course combines the fundamentals of nutrition 
with food preparation and meal planning to meet 
nutritional requirements. The content and emphasis 
is appropriate for nurses whose responsibilities 
will be mostly with their patients. This course 
follows closely the outline suggested in Curriculum 
for Schools of Nursing. By permission of instructor. 
3 class hours, 1 3-hr. laboratory period Credit 4 
Prerequisites Chemistry 1 and 2, and Zoology 35. 

Home Economics 42 - Medical Dietetics. The principles 
and practice of dietary restrictions and modifications 
recommended for certain diseases, always keeping in 
mind the nutritional needs of the individual. Stu- 
dents learn to use current medical literature for 
supplementary reference in connection with new 
developments. 

2 class hours. Credit 2 

Prerequisite: Home Economics 41, or equivalent. 

Speech 63 (i) - Television Programming and Production. 
An exploration of the television medium for orientation 
in producing, directing and writing: network, local and 
educational operations both studio and remote. 
2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit 3 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Speech 64 (il) - Television Programming and Production,, 
Practical television techniques from effective planning 
through effective execution by people off camera and 
on camera. 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period 
Prerequisite Speech 63. Credit 3 

Speech 65 (i) - Writing for Television. A consideration 
of television writing methods for the successful pro- 
duction of all types of formats. 

3 class hours, Credit 3 

Speech 66 (II) - Film Production and Staging for Tele- 
vision. Preparation and execution of 16 mm films for 
television; the course will prepare a 10-minute film 
project from the idea to editing, processing, screening 
and narration,, 

2 class hours; 1 2-hour laboratory period 
Prerequisite: Speech 63. Credit 3 

History of Philosophy 65 (i) - Ancient and Medieval. 
A survey of development of western thought with 
emphasis on the cultural factors which generated and 
interacted with the successive philosophical inter- 
pretations of man's experience. 

3 class hours* Credit 3 

History of Philosophy 66 (II) - Modern. Attention is 
centered on the impact of modern science on the 
development of man's comprehensive understanding of 
the world, of the powers and limitations of knowledge, 
and of the basis of his valuations. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Philosophy of Science 72 (II) - A study of the back- 
grounds, presuppositions, methods and general theories 
of modern physical, biological and social sciences. 
Readings selected from the works of leading scientists 
and philosophers will be used as the basis of class 
discussions which will attempt to explore the great 
scientific achievements of our time and to assess 
their importance in the student's construction of a 
mature philosophic orientation. 
3 class hours. Credit 3 

Upon the recommendation of the Graduate School faculty and 

of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the following 
new graduate course - German 22, Advanced Spoken 
German. Credit 3 

Prerequisite, German 79 & 80 or their equivalents as 
determined by a qualifying examination. 



1973 



New Graduate 
Course 



1974 



COMMITTEE 



Quality Point 

Grading 
System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that for about a year the faculty 

of the University has been considering a change in the grading 

system from numerical grades to letter grades and after discussion 

at various faculty meetings had voted by written ballot 4 to 1 in 

favor of adoption of the letter grade system - 

A for exceptional work 

B for excellent work 

C for average work 

D for passing work 

F for failure 

Four points would be allowed for each credit of work of A grade, 

3 points for each credit of B grade, 2 points for each credit of 

C grade, 1 point for each credit of D grade, no points for F» A 

2.00 grade point average would be required for graduation. 

The President explained that this system is in general use 

in most universities throughout the country „ After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED: Unanimously to recommend that the Trustees approve 

the adoption of the quality point grading system for 
the undergraduate college of the University in 
accordance with the attached program. 

And it was 

VOTED ? Unanimously to recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following changes in requirements for degrees in the 
Graduate School. 

1. Letter grades are to be substituted for numerical 
grades. 

2. Only grades of A, B, or C are to be allowed for 
graduate credit with no more than 6 credits of C 
for the Master's degree or 12 credits of C for the 
Ph.D. degree. 

3. A grade of C for the thesis will not be allowed. 
The meeting was adjourned at 12; 45 p.m. 




■yy^Z^^UeLt ^ S ecretary 



] 



University of Massachusetts 

QUALITY POINT GRADING SYSTEM 

From: Committee appointed to consider details relating to the 
Grading System 

To: President Mather 

Subject: Administrative Details for Letter and Quality Point 
Grading System 

The Committee recommends annroval of the following policy 
covering the letter and quality point grading system, 

I. Marking 

All undergraduate marking shall be done according to a. 
letter system under which the cla^swork of students will 
be rateo" as follows: 

A - exceptional 

B - excellent 

C - average 

D - passing 

F - failure 
Inc - the mark, Incomplete, will be reporter 1 only when 
a portion of assigned or required classwork has 
not been completed because of necessary absence 
of the student or other reosen equally satisfactory 
to the instructor, and then onl: r when the instructor 
judges the work already done to be of passing qualit/ 
Students may obtain credit for course marks of 
Incomplete only bv completing the work of the course 
before the end of the fourth week of the next 
semester in which they are enrolled. 

II, Quality Points 

Four noints are allowed for each credit of work of A grade; 

Three ooints for each credit of 3 grade; 

Two points for each crodit of C grade; 

One point for each credit of D grade; 

No points are given for graces of F or Inc» 

A 2,00 grade point ^verspre is require^ for graduation. 

Grade Point Averages 

A. Semester Point Averages: To comoute the semester grade point 
average, the total points earned will be divided by the total 
credits carried. Credit* carried are defined as total credits 
earned and failed, 

3, Cumulative Average: To compute the cumulative grade point 
average, the total points earned will be divided by total 
credits carried. Total credits carried will be the sum of the 
total credits earned and failed. In case courses are repeat^ 1 
only the last gra^e, credits, and points are considered in 
computing the cumulative average. 



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C. In computing grade point averages, the following will not be 
included : 

1. Required military pnd. physical education courses of 
the Rreshman and Sophomore years. 

2, Courses for which students do not receive credit toward 
a college degree (e.g., Mpth 01) 

III. Dismissal 

Dismissal from the University for scholastic reasons shall be 
based on the following regulations, to be administered by the 
Committee on Admissions and Records. A student is dismissed 
from the University as deficient in scholarship: 

A. If at the end of his first semester, he has failed three 
academic courses pnd has not earned a gr^de of C in each 
of the remaining two academic courses. 

B. If at the end of his second semester he has earned fewer 
than one and one-half (1,5) times as many quality ooints 
as the total number of credits for which he has been 
registered. 

C. If at the end of his fourth or of any subsequent semester 
he h-°s earned fewer than one and seven tenths (1.7) times 
as many quality points as the total number of credits for 
which he has been registered. 

D. Any student, subject to dismissal under the quality ooint 
rule alone will not be dismissed if his w rk in the current 
semester is sufficient in quality pnd. quantity that, if he 
continues such work until he has been in residence ten 
semesters, he will meet graduation requirements. Any fresh- 
man whose cumulative quality ooint ratio would make him 
subject to dismissal but whose wor 1 ^ in the second semester- 
alone would meet the quality, point ratio rule in paragraph 

C above, will not be dismissed, 
E t Any student who is dismissed, or any member of the faculty 
in his behalf, may request reconsideration of the case by 
the Committee on Admissions and Records, 

F. Wnen a student is dismissed from the TT niversity for 
scholastic reasons only, any certificate or transcript 
issued must contain the statement, "Dismissed for scholastic 
deficiency but otherwise entitled to honorpble dismissal". 

G, Dismissal involves non-residence on the University campus 
or in fraternity or sorority residences coming under 
University supervision, 

IV. Changes in registration - adding and dropping courses. 

A. No course will be recorded on the permanent records of the 
University nor will a student receive credit for it unless 
the student has registered for such a course in accordance 
with the established orocedure on a regularly scheduled 
registration day or unless his registration shall have been 
made official by the signature of the Registrar, A student 
may not add or drop a course except in accordance with these 
regulations. A course will not be considered, dropped with- 
out the si^n^ture of the Registrar. A course dropoed with- 
out apnrovpl will be recorded as a failure. 



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B. A student may add or dror> a subject only upon the written 
recommendation of his adviser (or Dean of the School, College, 
or Division in which he is enrolled) and the Registrar, 

C. The normal time for adding or dropping courses will be 
established and recorded in the official University Calendar 
by the selection of the nearest practicable date which will 
allow approximately three weeks from the last scheduled 
official registration day of each semester. The selection 
of this date shall be the responsibility of the Provost of 
the University, A student adding a course without written 
approval of his adviser and confirmation by the Registrar, 
will not receive credit for the course. A student may not 
enroll in a course after the established registration date 
without the approval of the instructor, A student dropping 
a course without approval will receive' a failure in the 
cours-e, A course dropped with approval within the three 
week period will not be counted in calculating quality 
points. 

D. A course dror>r>ed after the date regularly established in 
the University Calendar will receive a mark of WF (with- 
drawn failing). This mark will be computed in the quality 
point everere. If a student presents a valid reason for 
dropping a. course after the established date, with a state- 
ment from his instructor that he is passing ^t the time and 
after approval (as indicated in IV B. above), the course 
will be recorded as WP (withdrawn passing). No substitute 
course may be added for a course so dropper! , and the WP 
grac'e is not computed in the quality point average, 

E. In case of voluntary withdrawal from "the University, the 
rules for WF and vp grades will apply to the entire course 
program of the student withdrawing, 

Donald W, Cadigan 

Fred P. Jeffrey 

Carl A. Keyser 

Helen S. Mitchell 

William H. Ross 

Stanley C. Vance 

H, Leland Varley 

Gilbert L, M oodside, Chairman 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
October 5, 1954, 11:00 a.m., Chairman Bartlett's Office 

Chairman VJhitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Whitmore, Brett, Bartlett 
Boyden, Cashin, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson discussed ex- 
pected enrollment in the fall of 1956 and it was agreed that 
additional dormitory space for 433 students will be needed by 
September of 1956. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to obtain legislation authorizing 
the building of additional dormitories to be 
completed by September 1, 1956 and to house 
approximately 4-33 students. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Collins Electric 

Company had completed contract number 13 for steam and electric 

distribution as of June 1, 1954* The work has been approved by 

the University Engineer. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the trustees accept as 
completed June 1, 1954- the work done by 
the Collins Electric Company on contract 
#13 for steam and electric distribution. 

The committee reviewed the architect' s plans for the 

new Classroom Building for which $1,000,000 has been appropriated 

The building contains 42 classrooms with 1560 seats, 42 offices 

(mostly for 2 men each) and 6 seminar rooms. After inspection of 

the plans, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

architect' s plans for the Classroom Building 
as presented. 



1975 



Massachusetts 

Building 

Association 



Steam and 

Electric 

Distribution 



Classroom 
Building 



1976 



COMMITTEE 



Architectural 
Consultant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that the University has inter- 
viewed a number of architectural firms on the campus and asked 
each of them to submit statements as to their qualifications, 
previous work, and especially their ideas as to how they would 
approach the problem of architectural coordination at the Univer- 
sity. The President recommended Leland and Larsen as #1 and 
either Cram and Ferguson or Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean 
as #2. He suggested that the Trustees might wish to interview 
representatives from these firms and then make final selection. 
However, after discussion, it was 

VOT ED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the President to select one of the follow- 
ing three firms to act as architectural 
consultant in coordination of campus de- 
velopment and to authorize the Treasurer 
in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees to enter into contract with the 
firm selected by the President for archi- 
tectural consulting for not to exceed 
$10,000 during the present fiscal year, 
as appropriated; 

1. Leland and Larsen 

2. Cram and Ferguson 

3. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean 

The committee recommended that the architectural firm 
selected by the President should also work with Shurcliff & 
Shurcliff who are preparing the master plan for the University. 
It is understood that Shurcliff & Shurcliff are planning to employ 
an architectural firm in their study and that they will employ a 
firm named by the Trustees and pay him from their fee. This pay- 
ment and service will be in addition to the $10,000 appropriated 
to the University for architectural consulting services. 

On the recommendation of the faculty committee on 

Naming Buildings and on the recommendation of President Mather, 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



< 



J 



the committee 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees officially- 
designate the Greenhouse replacement for 
the old Durfee Eange as the Durfee Con- 
servatory and the greenhouses attached to 
French Hall as the Edward A. White Green- 
houses, in memory of Edward A. White who was 
a graduate of the University in the Class of 
1895 and Head of the Department of Floricul- 
ture from the time it was organized in 1907 
until he went to Cornell University in 1913 • 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:4-0 p.m. 




Secretary 



James W. 



1977 



Durfee 
Conservatory 



Edward A. 

White 

Greenhouses 



1978 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



\- 



Theta Chi 
Fraternity 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 5, 1954, 11:00 a.m., Chairman Bartlett 1 s Office 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Brett, 

Cashin, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



Chairman Bartlett and Treasurer Johnson discussed 

progress on the Theta Chi mortgage loan request and the Chairman 

stated that he was now satisfied that all arrangements are in 

proper order. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To lend to the Theta Corporation of Theta 
Chi Fraternity the sum of forty thousand 
(4-0,000) dollars, payable in semi-annual 
installments of one thousand (1,000) dollars 
each, with interest at the rate of four (4) 
per cent per annum, payable semi-annually, 
in exchange for the corporation' s negotiable 
promissory note, secured by a mortgage of 
the corporation's real estate known as 
496 North Pleasant Street in said Amherst; 
the first advance on this note is to be in 
the amount of seven thousand five hundred 
(7,500) dollars, and is to be used to pay 
off the pre-existing mortgage between the 
parties hereto, and Kenneth V. Johnson, 
Treasurer of the University of Massachusetts, 
is, for and in behalf of the Trustees of the 
University of Massachusetts, hereby authorized, 
empowered and directed to execute and deliver 
a good and sufficient discharge of said pre- 
existing mortgage, and to enter into an 
appropriate Construction Loan Agreement with 
said Fra.ternity, and to do any and all other 
acts and deeds necessary and incidental to 
this vote. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University Store 

has been operating a snack bar in Baker dormitory but that no 

rate has been fixed for the amount of rent the store should pay 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for the space. After discussions with the Business Manager of the 

University and the Manager of the Store, it had been agreed that 

a fair amount would be $500 per year and that this rate should be 

effective July 1, 1953* The University Store has saved funds for 

back payment of rent. After discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize a rate of $500 per year to be 
paid by the University Store to the Univer- 
sity for the rental of the Snack Bar space 
in Baker dormitory - such rate to be 
effective July 1, 1953. 

On the recommendation of President leather and of the 

Scholarship Committee of the University, it was 

VOTED ; To award Commonwealth Scholarships to the 

following students who will replace Common- 
wealth Scholarship recipients who have with- 
drawn from the University: 

1. Roger J. Cloutier '56 

2. Elizabeth A. McLaughlin '56 

3. Patricia G. McMahon '56 
4.. William J. Sturtevant '56 

The committee also 

VOTED ; To approve the following list of students 
to whom Commonwealth Scholarships may be 
awarded by the Scholarship Committee of the 
University with the approval of the Presi- 
dent in the event of further withdrawals of 
students already awarded Commonwealth 
Scholarships. It is understood that the 
following list of men are in priority order 
by classes and will replace men who withdraw 
and that the following women students are 
also in priority order by classes and will 
replace women who withdraw. 



1979 



University 
Store - 
Snack Bar 



Commonwealth 
Scholarships 



Roger Babb '56 
Stuart E. "Wiles '56 
Philip M. Smith '56 



Laura M. Caron '56 
Pris cilia J. Gooding '56 
Carolyn A. Sadlow '57 
Lois C. Bain '57 



1980 



COMMITTEE 

William E. 
Meehl, Exten- 
sion Veteri- 
narian in 
Poultry 



Thomas V. Fox, 
Head of the 
Department of 
Poultry 



Association of 
Governing Boards 
of State Uni- 
versities and 
Allied Institu- 
tions 



Massachusetts 

Building 

Association 



Steam and 

Electric 

Distribution 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To appoint Dr. William Edward Meehl as 
Extension Veterinarian in Poultry with 
the rank of Professor on a calendar year 
basis effective October 6, 1954- at salary 
of |7,080. Dr. Meehl is a practicing 
veterinarian in Lunenburg, Massachusetts 
and was graduated from the College of 
Veterinary A ' A edicine, Ohio State University 
in 1951. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED: To promote Dr. Thomas W. Fox from Assistant 
Research Professor to Head of the depart- 
ment of Poultry effective October 1, 1954 - 
this appointment to be on the calendar year 
basis at annual salary of $7,680. Dr. Fox 
is a graduate of the University of Massachu- 
setts in 1949, received the Master's degree 
in 1950 and Ph.D. degree from Purdue Uni- 
versity in 1953* 

It was 

VOTED: To authorise the Chairman to name two 

delegates from the Board of Trustees to 
attend the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion of Governing Boards of State Univer- 
sities and Allied Institutions in New York 
City, November 15-19, 1954- Chairman 
Bartlett named Trustees Whitmore and Taber. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Buildings and ^rounds, it was 

VOTED : To request the University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to obtain legislation 
authorizing the building of additional 
dormitories to be completed by September 1, 
1956 and to house approximately 433 students. 

It was 

VOTED: To accept as completed June 1, 1954 the work 
done by the ^ollins Electric Company on con- 
tract #13 for steam and electric distribution. 



1 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was 

VOTED: That the trustees approve the architect's 
plans for the Classroom Building as pre- 
sented. 

It was 

VOTED; To authorize the President to select one of 
the following three firms to act as archi- 
tectural consultant in coordination of cam- 
pus development and to authorize the 
Treasurer in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees to enter into contract with the 
firm selected by the President for archi- 
tectural consulting for not to exceed $10,000 
during the present fiscal year, as appropriated: 

1. Leland and Larsen 

2. Cram and Ferguson 

3. Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe 
and ^ean 

It was also 

VOTED: To request the President to designate the 
firm selected to work with Shurcliff and 
Shurcliff in preparation of the Master Plan 
and to be paid additionally for this service 
from the fee paid for the faster Plan. 

It was 

VOTED: That the trustees officially designate the 
Greenhouse replacement for the old Durf ee 
Range as the Durfee Conservatory and that 
the greenhouses attached to French Hall as 
the Edward A. White Greenhouses in memory 
of Edward A. White who was a graduate of the 
University in the Class of 1895 and Head of 
the Department of Floriculture from the time 
it was organized in 1907 until he went to 
Cornell University in 1913* 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:40 p.m. 



1981 



Classroom 
Building 



Architectural 
Consultant 



Master 
Plan 




cretary 



Chairman 



Durfee 
Conservatory 

Edward A*. 

White 

Greenhouses 



COMMITTEE 



Land 
Use 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 
November 3, 1954-, 11:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston 

Trustee Brett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 

Crowley, Whitmore, Louis A. Webster 
who represented Commissioner Hawes 
at the invitation of the committee, 
President Mather, Dean Sieling, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
with reading of the minutes of the last 
meeting. 

Dean Sieling and President Mather discussed the problem 
of land use and needs for the School of Agriculture. The tendency 
of various departments in Agriculture, they indicated, is to con- 
tinue to use the same amount of land year after year regardless of 
changes or new developments which may make the use of less land not 
only more economical but more feasible in terms of research and in- 
struction. 

At the present time agricultural land is being lost by 
the development of new buildings, tennis courts, athletic fields 
and highways. With the development of the new north south highway 
at the western edge of the campus, it may prove desirable to plan 
on moving the University farm buildings to a new site over the 
next decade. Two privately owned farms at the western edge of the 
University lands are available and Shurcliff and Shurcliff who are 
preparing a master plan for University development will be asked 
to make recommendations as to the location of the farm lands and 

buildings. 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Inherent in the problem of proper land use is the number 
of livestock kept. The present herds at the University are there 
partly for actual instruction and research needs and partly because 
of sentimental and other attachments of private herd owners. The 
University could do all the research and instruction necessary in 
beef cattle with a herd of Angus or herd of Herefords but it has 
both. The University keeps various herds of dairy cattle and also 
has 22 Morgan horses. 

At this time when new lands are needed, it is especially 
desirable to reconsider the number of farm animals kept. 

The President pointed out that Morgan horses are not a 
part of the agricultural program of the University. There has been 
a rumor that the University plans to dispose of its Morgan horses 
and many letters of protest have been written to the Dean of Agri- 
culture, to the President and to various members of the Board. 

Apparently the advocates of Morgan horses champion them 
as recreational animals and the Morgans have some use as show 
animals; for example, the University Morgan horses took four out 
of five top prizes at the Eastern States Exposition this year. 
However, 37 acres of land are used for the forage of the Morgans 
and a very considerable number of man hours on the farm are de- 
voted to their care. 

The President said that he and Dean Sieling will con- 
tinue to work with the Department of Animal Husbandry and will de- 
velop a specific recommendation as to the basic herds necessary 
for the operation of a sound program of teaching and research in 
Animal Husbandry. 



1983 



Morgan 
Horses 



1984 



COMMITTEE 



Extension 
Service 



County- 
Workers 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee discussed Federal, State and County rela- 
tionships in the agricultural extension service. Dean Sieling 
stated that the problem of these relationships is different in 
Massachusetts. In the other 4-7 states, county agricultural work- 
ers are employed by the state university and are part of its staff. 
In Massachusetts, extension work began in the counties and in the 
state before the federal government adopted its extension program 
in 1914- • Each county in Massachusetts has its own board of trustees 



in agriculture and employs its own staff. No state funds from the 
University budget are used in support of county programs but the 
University does administer approximately $150,000 a year of 
federal funds which are spent in the counties. There are various 
memoranda of understanding between the county trustees and the 
state director of extension. These memoranda specify that the 
state extension director and the state county agent leader shall 
be given opportunity to certify as to whether applicants for 
county positions are qualified for the work. Most county em- 
ployees also hold federal appointments and are eligible for 
federal retirement and must be certified as to their qualifications 
by the extension director of the state in order to hold federal 
appointment. 



Dean Sieling pointed out that county autonomy in one 
sense is a strength in Massachusetts because the county appropriates 
very heavily for the conduct of agricultural extension program. 
In another sense home rule in the counties is somewhat of a weak- 
ness in that the county boards can and sometimes do defy the 

state authorities and make appointments regardless of the 
memoranda of understanding. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The federal government has raised some question as to 
the legality of the county and state agreements in Massachusetts 
and it is a possibility that federal funds may some day be cut off 
in Massachusetts unless a better working agreement between the 
state and the county is reached. 

There is also confusion in the minds of the public over 
the state-county relation. The University has been criticized 
from time to time for actions taken in the counties which are be- 
yond the control of the University. 

The President and the Dean of Agriculture made no 
recommendation to the committee for immediate action but stated 
that they Wanted the committee to be informed, as the problem may 
develop more seriously in the future. 

Dean Sieling said that the Dairy Industry Department of 
the School of Agriculture provides instruction in milk pasteuriza- 
tion, bottling, ice cream making and other dairy practices. The 
ice cream and milk processed are sent to the University Boarding 
Hall and are used in student meals. All the milk from the Univer- 
sity herds is used in the dairy and a considerable amount of raw 
milk is bought on the outside and processed. The equipment in the 
dairy industry building is obsolete and should be replaced. He 
said that he would like to have the opinion of the committee as to 
whether the University should expand this operation so that it may 
provide all the milk needed by the students as the University de- 
velops. For a cost of approximately $31>000 the University can 
buy pasteurization and bottling equipment which would take care of 



1985 



Dairy 
Industry 



Milk 



1986 



COMMITTEE 



Dairy- 
Cattle 
Certification 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3,000 to 10,000 students. This equipment would give the dairy stu- 
dents a better opportunity of studying up-to-date dairy processing 
equipment. On the recommendation of the Dean and of the President, 
it was 

VOTfD ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the University to obtain equipment and 
facilities for the Dairy Department 
necessary to bring the program up to par 
with the needs of the current instructional 
service. 

It was further recommended that the 
Trustees authorize the University to obtain 
the milk processing equipment from the appro- 
priation made by the Legislature for re- 
modelling the dairy building and for improve- 
ments to farm buildings - this total amount 
is $14.5,000. 

President Mather and Dean Sieling said that they are re- 
viewing the rates charged for services rendered by the various con- 
trol law programs of the University. At the present time they 
recommend an increase in the fees charged for dairy cattle certi- 
fication. At the present time the annual cost of this program is 
$21,532. The income is $18,505* The herd owners in' the past have 
accepted the principle of paying in full for this service but re- 
cent increases in salary costs have caused the deficit. On the, 
recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following ratts for dairy cattle certifica- 
tion effective December 1, 1954-- 



Advanced registry 



Up to 12 cows 3X or 
Up to 18 cows 2X 

1 string $27.00 
Additional strings 24-. 00 



13 to 16 cows 3X or 
19 to 2U cows 2X 

$32.00 
29.00 



j 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Herd Impro vement Registry 



COMMITTEE 



I 



Up to 20 cows 3X or 
Up to 30 cows 2X 

1 string 
Additional strings 



19-50 
17.00 



21 to 30 cows 3X or 
31 to IS cows 2X 

24.50 
22.00 



Effective December 1, 1954. the charge for H. I, P.. office fees for 
Massachusetts will be 50 per cow per month with a minimum charge 
of $1.00 per herd per month. 

The rate for Special Check Tests after December 1, 1954- will be: 



Up to 30 cows 2X or 20 cows 3X 

31 to 4-5 cows 2X or 21 to 30 cows 3X 

46 to 60 cows 2X or 31 to U0 cows 3X 

61 to 75 cows 2X or 41 to 50 cows 3X 



$27.00 
32.00 
51.00 
56.00 



1 



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The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 




>£^Secretary 



1988 



COMMITTEE 



Public Health 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
December 1, 1954* 12 noon, Dining Commons, Amherst, Massachusetts 

Chairman Vhitmore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Whitmore, Haigis, Taber, 
McDermott, President Mather, 
Mr. Larson, architect; Mr. Shurcliff, 
landscape architect; Treasurer 
Johnson, Business Manager Ludden, 
Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

President Mather said that the University has been con- 
sidering a new location for the Public Health Building. This build- 
ing has been in planning stage for some years and originally was to 
have been constructed off Stockbridge Road in the general area be- 
tween the Dining Commons and the Home Economics Building. After 
the architect had completed his plans for the building, it was 
found that the lowest construction bid was very considerably in ex- 
cess of the appropriation. The building is now being re-designed 
by James H. Ritchie Associates of Boston to come within the appro- 
priation. 

The President recalled that the building was to serve as 
western Massachusetts headquarters of the State Department of 
Public Health and part of the building was to be used for in- 
struction in Public Health and Bacteriology by the University. 

Since the building was first planned, the President said 
that a number of changes in the general picture have occurred. The 
University's Department of Bacteriology and Public Health is grow- 
ing rapidly and will need more space than the building at its 



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COMMITTEE 



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I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

present cost would provide. Secondly, the building needs of other 
natural sciences are becoming urgent; and thirdly, the University 
has now employed the firm of Shurcliff and Shurcliff to prepare 
a master plan for a ten-year growth period of the University, 
The University has also entered into contract with the architec- 
tural firm of Leland and Larsen, and Mr. Larsen is giving personal 
attention to the design of University buildings. 

The President said it now seems better planning to pro- 
vide for one large science center to house Geology, Botany, 
Bacteriology, Zoology and possibly Entomology than to create addi- 
tions to the small departmental buildings now in existence. The 
state will save money by avoiding expensive duplication of special 
plumbing and laboratory facilities and equipment. The science de- 
partments can make joint use of certain high-cost installations 
such as electron microscopes. 

It seems best, the President said, to relocate the 
Public Health Building so that it can become part of the general 
Science Center. The new location should be in an area which will 
permit the development of a large structure so that the science 
departments of the University can expand as the student population 
increases. This plan has been discussed with the Public Building 
Commission and with the -Public Health Department, Both groups are 
in favor of the change. 

If the Trustees favor this new plan, the decision should 
be made as soon as possible so that the architect may design the 
Public Health Building for the new location and in relation to a 

larger structure to follow. 



1989 



Science 
Center 



1990 



COMMITTEE 



Traffic 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman VJhitmore said that the committee welcomed 
having Mr. Larsen and Mr. Shurcliff attend the meeting so that the 
Trustees might become familiar with their outlook and plans. The 
Chairman asked Mr. Shurcliff whether he had arrived at any tenta- 
tive conclusions even though his survey and planning have just be- 



gun. 



Mr. Shurcliff said that one of the most serious problems 



facing the University is traffic circulation and parking. With a 
new by-pass coming to the west of the campus and with an expected 
doubling of enrollment, a new approach to campus planning must be 
undertaken. Planning for a much larger University must necessarily 
violate certain campus traditions. However, every effort will be 
made to preserve all that is good from the past and still meet 
future needs. Mr. Shurcliff said that he has given careful con- 
sideration to approaches to the University from the new highway. 
He feels that no connection is needed at the north end of campus, 
at least at the present. A connection at the middle would be un- 
desirable as it would feed traffic into the busiest section of 
pedestrian use. The best approach from the new highway seems to 
be at the south end of the campus. From this approach traffic 
could filter through various outlets. Mr. Shurcliff presented a 
preliminary sketch showing proposed traffic circulation. The key 
feature of the plan is a proposed traffic circle west of Fernald 
Hall. This circle would slow traffic as it enters and leaves the 
campus, would create safer approaches from side roads to the main 
highway, and properly landscaped would make a fitting approach to 

the University. He suggested that the general Science Center could 
be located to the north of this traffic circle extending north and 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

south along route 116. 

Chairman "Whit-more raised question as to whether a 
$3 t 500,000 Science Center would overpower and dominate the campus. 
Would it be too massive? 

Mr. i»arsen said that in ground floor area the building 
would be larger than anything now constructed on the campus. How- 
ever, good architectural planning will avoid massiveness. The 
Center can be handled as a series of connected smaller buildings. 
It can be integrated into the campus surroundings and will not stand 
out like an elephant among sheep. President Mather pointed out 
further that a $3,500,000 Science Center would mean about $2,000,000 
in building and $1,500,000 in scientific equipment and furnishings. 
Furthermore, this building could be balanced on the opposite side 
of the campus by the $2,000,000 liberal arts building and the 
$2,000,000 addition to the Library. 

There was discussion as to whether the Public Health 
section of the building should be at the southern end or the northern 
end of the Science Center. The architects and the committee agreed 
that the south end would be better because of the ease of parking 
and also to keep non-university use of the building farthest from 
the heart of the campus. 

Trustee Taber raised question as to whether the Public 
Health people are getting too much consideration as to desirable 
location. The same features which make this location desirable for 
them may well make it desirable for University use. President Mather 
end the architects stated that getting Public Health out of its 
previous location near the Dining Commons will be a great achieve- 
ment in saving desirable locations for strictly University use. 



1991 



1992 



COMMITTEE 



Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Shurcliff pointed out on his campus planning map a 
circle extending 2500 feet in radius from the power plant. He 
said that on the basis of recommendations from Merrill Associates, 
all heated buildings will be planned within this circle as this is 
the extreme or nearly the extreme limit for low pressure steam. 
Trustee Taber raised question as to whether this 2500 radius would 
be too limiting and whether high pressure steam should be con- 
sidered. Mr. Shurcliff said that for a period of at least ten 
years, and quite possibly longer, he is satisfied to work within 
the 2500 foot radius. He pointed out large tracts of undeveloped 
land within this circle. 

Trustee Haigis raised question as to the need for addi- 
tional land as the University expands. President Mather said that 
Mr. Haigis had pointed to a pressing problem as the University cer- 
tainly will need to replace the agricultural lands now being taken 
for building use. He pointed out the privately-owned farm lands to 
the west of the brook and said that steps should be taken to ac- 
quire this area. It will also be necessary to move the barns to 
this new area as the University grows. The President also 
pointed to the Montague property and said that steps are being 
taken to acquire a good portion of this land. 

In answer to question from Trustee Whitmore, Mr. Shurcliff 
said that he plans to retain the open campus area south of the 
crosswalk. Common sense and tradition are in agreement on this. 
Mr. Shurcliff made tentative recommendation that the ravine to the 
east of the power plant be filled and used for parking. There was 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

no objection from members of the committee. 

Trustee Haigis asked whether 10,000 students is the limit 
envisioned by the University. President Mather said that this 
number of students is expected in terms of population by 1965 but 
is not necessarily an upper limit. From 1965 to 1970 there will be 
even greater pressure for admission. However, the President indi- 
cated that he does not feel that the University should expand 
indefinitely as have some of the western state universities. He 
feels that a size will be reached beyond which it would be un- 
economical and unfeasible to go. By this time the teachers 
colleges might well be developed as community colleges to provide 
two-year terminal education in the community for those who desire 
it, to provide four years of teacher training, or to provide the 
first two years of a college program with the last two years and 
graduate work to be taken at the University in Amherst. 

After further discussion, the committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees rescind their 

vote of May 1, 1951 locating the Public Health 
Building near the Dining Commons. 

The committee also 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Public Health Build- 
ing be located to the south of Clark Hall 
as the first section of a Science Center 
for the University. 

Speaking for the committee, Chairman Whitmore expressed 

his appreciation to Mr. Larsen and to Mr. Shurcliff for their views 

in the development of the University. He said that he likes their 

plans and their approach to campus planning and that the committee 

is in agreement that these plans should be explored further along 

the lines suggested. 



Public 
Health 
Center 



1994 



COMMITTEE 



Power 
Plant 



Utility 
Services 



Engineering 
Building 



Arnold 
House 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson presented highlights from the report 
on power plant and utility needs of the University as prepared by 
Merrill Associates. 

1. The University should generate its own electrical 

energy both summer and winter. 

2. Better salary classifications should be established 
so as to obtain and keep good operations personnel. 

3. Boilers and generators should remain on low pressure 
basis. 

4-. New generators should be installed also of low 
pressure. 

5. The plant should be extended in two directions - 
boilers to the north and turbines to the south. 

6. The master plan to be prepared by Mr. Shurcliff 
shall govern the location of future buildings and 
hence of utility lines. 

7. The old plant should remain on coal. 

3. Merrill recommended oil for additions to the 

plant but this has been vetoed in favor of coal 
by the State Purchasing Agent. 

Chairman Vhitmore asked the architects whether coal would 
be satisfactory and no objection was voiced. 

On the recommendation of the campus committee for naming 

buildings and of the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees name the main 
Engineering Building "Engineering". 

It is understood that space will be reserved by the 
architect to make possible a personal memorialization later if it 
should be desired. 

The committee inspected Arnold House and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 

building as complete as of December 1, 1954-* 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee visited and inspected the new Durfee Con- 



servatory and 



VOTED; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
building as complete on October 22, 1954 
but vith the understanding that cracks in 
the pool floor will be repaired and the 
exterior cement wall be scrubbed or brushed 
to remove stains. 

The committee visited and inspected Draper Hall and 

VOTED; To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
renovation of Draper Hall as complete on 
December 1, 1954- with the stipulation that 
the contractor shall complete minor con- 
struction details such as painting of the 
basement corridor and completing installa- 
tion of baseboards. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4*30 p.m. 



1995 



Durfee 
Conservatory 



^ 





Secretary 



Draper 
Hall 



1996 



COMMITTEE 



Leland, 
Allen S. 



Mottla 
Gilbert E. 



Emeritus 
Faculty 



Thayer, 
Charles Hiram 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY & PROGRAM OF STUDY 
December 7, 1954-* 11:30 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 
Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Bartlett, Crowley, 
Desmond, Perry, Miss Buxton, 
Mrs. McNamara, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Mr. Allen S. Leland to the position of 
Extension Professor of Agriculture, 
calendar year basis, effective January 1, 
1955 at beginning salary of $7030 pay- 
able from Federal funds 

The duties to be performed in this position are related 
to the County Agricultural Extension program and specific emphasis 
will be on farm planning, marketing, and consumer education. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees appoint 

Gilbert E. Mottla as Head of the Depart- 
ment of Communications, School of Agri- 
culture and Horticulture, calendar year 
basis, effective February 1, 1955 at annual 
salary of $7630 payable from Federal funds, 
this appointment to be subject to final 
approval by the President after a personal 
interview with %*. Mottla. 

This is a new position made possible through new Federal 

grants to the Experiment Station and the Extension Service. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
emeritus status for certain retired 
faculty members as follows: 

Charles Hiram Thayer, Assistant Professor 
of Agronomy, Emeritus, effective on his re- 
tirement September 30, 1954- (after 35 
years of service) . 



' 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Roland Hale Verbeck, Director of Short 
Courses, Emeritus, effective on his re- 
tirement September 30, 1954- (after 30 
years of service) . 

Arthur Dunham Holmes, Research Professor 
of Chemistry, Emeritus, effective on his 
retirement July 31 > 1954- (after 12 years 
of service) . 

Llewellyn Light Derby, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Physical Education, Emeritus, 
effective on his retirement September 30, 
1954- (after 33 years of service) . 

On the recommendation of the University Course of Study 

Committee and of the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following new courses and changes 
in course: 

1. Change Civil Engineering 55 - Highway Engineering 
to CIVIL ENGINEERING 55 (I) TRANSPORTATION ENGI- 
NEERING. 

Transportation systems, elements of railroad, high- 
way, traffic, and airport engineering. Route loca- 
tion and elementary intersection design. 
Two class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, C.E. 30 Credit, 3 

2. New course Civil Engineering 93 (II) ADVANCED 
TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING. 

Analysis of the engineering aspects of traffic 
problems such as traffic signal design, street 
capacities, parking and channelization. 
Two class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period. 
Prerequisite, C.E. 55 Credit, 3 



1997 



Verbeck, 

Roland Hale 



Holmes, 
Arthur Dunham 



Derby, 
Llewellyn Lighl 



New Courses 



New course Botany 69. 
PATHOLOGY. 



FOREST AND SHADE TREE 



Nature, cause and control of the principal types 
of disease in trees, including decay of forest 
products, standing and structural timer; insects 
and environment in relation to fungi and disease 
development; morphology and identification of 
fungi that induce disease or decay in trees. 
2 class hours 1 3-hour laboratory. Credit, 



1998 



COMMITTEE 



Business 

Administration 

Curriculum 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



A. New course OFFICE PROCEDURES I (I). 

This course provides instruction and laboratory- 
practice in office organization and procedures 
and the operation of office machines. 
1 class hour, U 1-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3 

5. New course OFFICE PROCEDURES II (II). 

A continuation of Office Procedures I, in- 
cluding the use of systems and records as 
managerial aids in the business office. 
1 class hour, 4- 1-hour laboratory periods. Credit, 3 

On the recommendation of the University Course of Study 

Committee and o^ the President, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following program in the School of Business 
Administration entitled (Management Train- 
ing". This program is designed to provide 
basic training in the various aspects of 
business management. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 

In the first two years the student will normally 
enroll in the College of Arts and Science. 

The Faculty of the School is more concerned with 
scholarship and promise of development than with the 
precise content of the courses which the prospective 
student offers for admission to the program. 



' 



JUNIOR YEAR 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Acct. 25, Intro, to Accounting I 3 Acct. 26, Intro, to Acct.II 3 
Office Procedures I 3 Office Proc. II 3 

Fin. 55, Financial Institutions 3 Mkt. 62, Market Ressearch 3 

Mkt. 53, Marketing Principles 3 Ec. 56, Bus. Fluctuations 3 

Elective 3 Elective _J3_ 

15 15 



f 



I 



1 



1999 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



SENIOR YEAR 



COMMITTEE 



I. A. 63, Management in Ind. 
B.L. 70, Business Lav I 
Stat. 79, El am. of Stat. 
Elective in Business 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

JL 
15 



I. A. 64., Personnel Mgt. 
Fin. 76, Insurance 
Soc. 68, Ind. Sociology 
Elective in Business 
Elective 



3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 




Secretary 



I 



1 



2000 



COMMITTEE 



Personnel 
Changes 



Promotion of 
Carl S. Roys 



Promotion of 
Donald P. Allan 



Retirement of 
Wilbur H. Thies 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TPJJSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 14, 1955? 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston 



Chairman Boyd en presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, B yden, Miss 
Buston, Opovley, Desmond, Mrs. 
McNamara, President Mather, 
Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 
reading of the minutes of the last pre- 
vious meeting. 

President Mather presented the attached report of per- 
sonnel changes during 1954> an d it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
report as presented. 

On the recommendation of President Mather and after re- 
view of qualifications, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Dr. Carl S. Roys from Professor to Head 
of the Electrical Engineering Depart- 
ment effective September 1, 1954- 

To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Donald P. Allan from Associate Professor 
to Professor, with catalogue title of 
Administrative Assistant to the Dean 
and Directors of the School of Agri- 
culture, effective February 15, 1955. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees name Wilbur 
H. Thies, Emeritus Professor of Pomology, 
effective on his retirement January 31, 1955- 

The Committee then reviewed recommendations for sabbati- 
cal leaves for members of the faculty during the academic year 



1 



] 



2001 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



1955-56. On the recommendation of the University Committee on 

Sabbatical Leaves and of the President Mather, it was 

VOTED : Subject to appropriation of funds, to 

approve the following sabbatical leaves 
according to the usual terms governing 
sabbatical leaves. 

1. Lawrence M. Bartlett , Associate Professor of Zoology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1956, to study Avian Anatomy with Dr. Harvey I. Fisher 
at the University of Illinois. 

2. James M. Ferrigno, Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages, for one year at half pay beginning 
September 1, 1955 > to spend the 3-ear in Italy and 
Spain continuing his investigation of the influence 
of Spanish on southern Italian dialects. 

3. Robert A. Fitzpatrick , Assistant Professor (research) 
of Agricultural Economics, for one semester at full 
pay beginning September of 1955, to complete the course 
requirements for the doctorate in Agricultural 
Economics at Purdue University. 

4-. John F. Hanson, Associate Professor of Entomology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February of 
1956, for collection and study of Stone Flies of the 
Eastern Seaboard, 

5. Vernon P. Helming , Professor of English, for one year 
at half pay beginning September I, 1955, to continue 
research into the Christian Pilgrimage as a popular 
custom and the uses of it by medieval writers. 

6. Helen S. Mitchell, Dean of the School of Home Economics, 
for one semester at full pay beginning September 1, 195 5 > 
to audit courses at Harvard in the field of Public Ad- 
ministration and Nutrition and to observe some of the 
nutrition programs being conducted by the food and agri- 
culture program in Rome and the Near East. 

7. Charles F. Oliver, Assistant Professor of Education, 

for one semester at full pay beginning September 1, 1955, 
to work on doctoral program in the School of Education 
at the University of Connecticut. 

3. Robert L. Rivers, Assistant Professor of Business Ad- 
ministration, for one semester at full pay beginning 
February 1, 1956, to complete doctorate study at the 
University of Illinois. 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



2002 



COMMITTEE 



New Courses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

9- Walter W. Smith, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering, for one year at half pay beginning September 1, 
195 5 , to study for the Master of Science degree in 
television at Syracuse University. 

10. Franklin ¥. Southwick, Professor (research) of Pomology, 
for one semester at full pay beginning February 1, 1956, 
for study of Pomology at the State Agricultural College 
at Davis, California, and in Oregon and Washington. 

11. Anthony ¥. Zaitz, Assistant Professor of Speech, for one 
year at half pay beginning September 1, 1955, for work 
toward the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Speech at the 
University of Wisconsin. 

On the recommendation of the University Course of Study 

Committee and of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 

changes in the course of study in accordance 
with the following schedule. 

(1) That Philosophy 61 and Philosophy 267 be discontinued and that 
two new courses in Philosophy be approved as follows: 

PHILOSOPHY 25 (I and II) INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY 

A study of the distinctive role of philosophy in its 
relations to the insights of science, religion, and 
art. The student is introduced to some of the 
general questions, ideas, theories, and methods of 
inquiry which have given direction to Western thought, 
and encouraged to clarify and examine his own Ideas 
regarding knowledge, reality, and value. 

(credit 3) 

PHILOSOPHY 7 A (II) ORIENTAL PHILOSOPHIES 

A study of the present conflict in ideologies within 
and between the leading cultures of Asia, understood 
in the light of their Philosophical history. The 
bearing of philosophical differences between East 
and West on the problem of mutual understanding. 

(credit 3) 

(2) That History 65, 66, 77 and 73 be discontinued and that two 
new courses in History be approved as follows: 

HISTORY 71 (I) MAIN CURRENTS IN ENGLISH THOUGHT 
(1600-1690) 

Main currents in English Thought, 1600-1690. A study 
of intellectual movements and their relation to politi- 
cal, religious, economic and social developments. 
3 class hours (credit 3) 



r 



f 



2003 



\ 



rOMMITTEE 



' 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

HISTORY 74 (II) AGE OF REFORMATION 

Age of Reformation. A study of the religious changes, 
and the accompanying political upheavals, social, economic 
and cultural developments in 16th and 17th Century 
Europe. (credit 3) 

(3) That the following new courses in Mathematics be approved: 

MATHEMATICS 6A (II) STATISTICS 

A continuation of Mathematics 63, including a study of 
the joint distribution of two or more random variables; 
the chi- squared, t-, and F-distributions and their 
applications; and techniques which do not involve an 
assumption about the form of the basic distribution. 
Prerequisite, Mathematics 63, 91 • (credit 3) 

MATHEMATICS 95-96 READINGS 

A reading course in advanced theoretical topics. For 
gifted senior only. The course is intended to furnish 
a student further preparation for graduate work in 
Mathematics. Topics may be chosen from the fields of 
algebra, analysis, geometry or applied Mathematics. 
Prerequisite, permission of the Department Head. 

(credit 3) 

(4.) That Landscape Architecture 37 be expanded to Landscape 
Architecture 37 and 83 as follows: 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 87 (I) CITY PLANNING 
Field surveys covering existing conditions, tabulation 
and analysis of information obtained in such surveys, 
preparation of land-use maps and supplementary material. 
Prerequisite, Landscape Architecture 36 (credit 3) 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 33 (II) CITY PLANNING 

Redevelopment projects and proposals based on studies 
made in Landscape Architecture 37 plus problems in the 
design of various urban areas. 
Prerequisite, Landscape Architecture 37 (credit 3) 

(5) That the following new courses in Home Economics be approved: 

HOME ECONOMICS 86 S WORKSHOP IN RECENT DEVELOPMENTS 
IN TEXTILES 

This course is a concentrated study of recent develop- 
ments in the field of textiles. Class and laboratory in- 
struction will include the characteristics and properties 
of the thermoplastic, protein, cellulose and mineral 
fibers (natural and synthetic): blends; fabric finishes 
and fabric care. Some field trips are an important 
phase of the work. Prerequisites: Home Ec. 26 or its 
equivalent. (credit 3) 



2004 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



HOME ECONOMICS 94- 



S 



WORKSHOP IN FOODS 



An intensive three weeks course dealing with the 
planning and preparation of family meals. Con- 
sideration will be given to new products, cost 
levels, new trends toward international foods, 
and out-door cookery. Designed for home economics 
teachers and others with a background knowledge of 
scientific food preparation. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 30 or its equivalent. (Limited to 16 
students.) (credit 3) 

(6) At present Mechanical Engineering 64- and Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 81 are offered to both majors and non majors. It is 
recommended that separate courses for non-majors be 
established as follows: 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 61 HEAT POWER (non Mechanical 
Engineering majors) 

A one semester terminal course designed to present 
to the student the fundamental principles involved 
in the production of power. It consists of the basic 
theory underlying the field of thermo-dynamic s and 
its application to power machinery. It includes a 
study of gases, vapors, thermodynamic processes, 
cycles and power measurement with considerable 
discussion, both quantitive and cualitive, of the 
application of the above to gasoline engines, diesel 
engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, and compressors. 
3 class hours (credit 3) 

Prerequisites - Physics 28, Math. 6 (The Department) 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 81 EXPERIMENTAL- MECHANICAL 
ENGINEERING (non Mechanical Engineering majors) 

Calibration and application of instruments used in 
the testing of mechanical engineering apparatus. 
Performance tests on mechanical engineering equipment 
such as internal combustion engines, steam power 
apparatus, refrigeration machines, and fans and 
blowers . 

2 3-hour laboratory periods. (credit 2) 

Prerequisites - M.E. 66; C.E. 75 con- 
currently (The Department) 

(7) It is recommended that the title and description of 
Economics 70, Monopolies, be changed as follows: 

ECONOMICS 70 THE STRUCTURE OF AMERICAN INDUSTRY 

A study of enterprise, market competition and economic 
development in American industries. (credit 3) 



I 



IOMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather reported that the Head of the Department 
of Agricultural Engineering resigned January 31> 1955 to accept a 
better position in another state. As a result of this resignation, 
the President, the Dean of Engineering and the Dean of Agriculture 
have held conferences concerning the future of the work in Agri- 
cultural Engineering. For the past several years there have been 
very few students pursuing the course toward the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Agricultural Engineering. At the present time only 
one student is enrolled as a major. This makes for extremely high 
costs of instruction and the President feels that it would be 
better to discontinue the offering of this degree. In the future, 
students wanting Engineering will enroll in Civil Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering or Chemical Engi- 
neering. However, the department has also carried a number of shop 
service courses for students in the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture. It will be necessary to continue these shop practice 
courses and also to continue research and extension work for the 
farmers of the state. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
discontinuance of the degree Bachelor of 
Science in Agricultural Engineering and to 
transfer the remaining functions of the de- 
partment of Agricultural Engineering from the 
School of Engineering to the School of Agri- 
culture. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 




ecretary 



2( 



D 



Agricultural 
Engineering 



2006 



COMMITTEE 



Power 
versus 
Generating 
Plant 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 26, 1955, 11:00 a.m., Chairman Bartlett' s Office 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Cashin, Brett, 
Haigis, V/hitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

The committee discussed a report submitted by Merrill 
Associates, Consulting Engineer, recommending the purchase of power 
from Western Massachusetts Electric Company as against expansion of 
the generating plant for the production of additional power by the 
University. 

Treasurer Johnson said that a meeting had been held in 
Boston and attended by Mr. Hall Nichols, Director of the Division 
of Building Construction; by Mr. Merrill of Merrill Associates; by 
representatives of the Western Massachusetts Electric Company; 
representatives of the State Department of Public Utilities and by 
George Brehm, Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds of the Uni- 
versity. Western Massachusetts Electric has submitted a proposal 
for a ten-year contract to supply power to the University at 1.8 
cents per kilowatt. Mr. Johnson said that the University can 
generate electricity for .5 cents per kilowatt. 

Under the terms of the ten-year contract, the University 
would save monejr during the first five years over the cost of 
building and operating a new generator but during the last few 

years would lose money. Mr. Johnson pointed out that the University 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



has an appropriation for the construction of a new turbine-generator 
but needs an additional appropriation for housing the generator. 
Whether or not the University installs the generator, it still will 
need approximately $1,000,000 for additions to the boiler plant. 

The University's engineer favors entering into contract 
with Western Massachusetts Electric in part because of the diffi- 
culty of recruiting and holding power plant engineers. Mr. Brehm, 
•Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, does not agree with the 
suppositions made by Merrill Associates in their report. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To defer action on generating or purchasing 
electric power until the May meeting of the 
Board . 

The committee considered administrative recommendations 

from the President and recommended that he proceed to implement 



them. 



President Mather reviewed the procedure by which the Uni- 



versity has sought a Dean of Arts and Science. The President 
appointed a committee made up of four representatives of the School 
of Arts and four representatives from the School of Science, elected 
by the respective Schools, to locate candidates and make recommenda- 
tions to the President who in turn would recommend to the Trustees. 
The committee made a wide search for candidates and brought many 
individuals to the campus for interview. Their work lias been com- 
pleted, and their final report was filed with the President on 
April 5> 1955. The President discussed some of the candidates 
recommended by the committee and indicated that two factors have 

combined to make final selection difficult. 



2007 



Dean of 
Arts and 
Science 



2008 



COMMITTEE 



College 
ShakevSpearean 
Club, Alpha 
Sigma Phi 
Scholarship 
Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1. The salary is low for the responsibility 
involved. 

2. The controls on the University cause re- 
strictions under which some men will not 
operate. 

After discussion and on the recommendation of President 

Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To authorize the President to offer appoint- 
ment as Dean of the College of Arts and 
Science to Dr. Charles C. Cole, Jr. Dr. Cole 
is currently Assistant Dean of Columbia Uni- 
versity, has the A.B., M.A. and Ph.D. from 
Columbia and is 32 years old. 

President Mather reported that he has received letter 

from Edwin F. Gaskill under date of February 28, 1955 as follows: 

"Gamma of Alpha Sigma Phi Corporation wishes to present 
to the University of Massachusetts the amount of five 
thousand dollars which is covered by the enclosed check. 
The following stipulation is made, that at the discretion 
of the President the income from this money shall be used 
to help needy students at the University. 

"The Corporation wishes that this gift may be known as the 
College Shakespearean Club, Alpha Sigma Phi Scholarship 
Fund." 

President Mather pointed out that $5>000 represents the 
proceeds from the sale to the University of the lot at the foot of 
Butterfield Hill which was owned by Alpha Sigma Phi. It is ex- 
pected that additional funds will be added to this amount as Alpha 
Sigma Phi closes its books. It was 

VOTED : To accept the gift of five thousand dollars 
from the Alpha Sigma Phi Corporation and to 
establish it as a permanent endowment fund 
of the University under the name of the 
College Shakespearean Club, Alpha Sigma Phi 
Scholarship Fund. 

It was also 

VOTED : To request the President to -convey the 

appreciation of the Trustees to Edwin F. 

Gaskill for the Alpha Sigma Phi Corporation. 



' 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the Treasurer and of the Presi- 



dent, it was 



was 



was 



was 



VOTED ; To establish a tuition fee of $30 for the 
9-weeks Summer Session of the Division of 
Nursing. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, it 



VOTED : To establish the following room rents for 
Stockbridge School students in the County- 
Circle dormitories. 

a. $155 per year, $77.50 first semester of 
15 weeks and $77.50 for second semester 
of 15 weeks, for all senior students, as 
well as freshmen majoring in Food 
Management and Forestry. 

b. |98 per year, $77.50 first semester of 
15 weeks and $20.50 for second semester 
of 4- weeks, for Poultry freshmen. 

c. $119 per year, $77.50 for first semester 
of 15 weeks and $41.50 for second semester 
of 8 weeks, for freshmen majoring in 
Animal Husbandry, Dairy Industry, Turf 
Maintenance, Arboriculture, Fruit Growing, 
Vegetable Growing, Floriculture and Orna- 
mental Horticulture. 

These rates are effective with the fall semester of 1955 < 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, it 



VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to execute an east- 
ment deed in the name of and for the Board of 
Trustees with Plymouth County Electric Company 
for a utility line across the Cranberry Station 
property in Wareham. 

On the recommendation of the President and Treasurer, it 



VOTED : To accept as completed the following two farm 
remodelling contracts - Massachusetts State 
Project U-502 



2009 



Division of 
Nursing - 
summer fee 



Room Rent for 

Stockbridge 

students 



Cranberry 
Station - 
utility line 



Farm Re- 
modelling 
Contracts 



2010 



COMMITTEE 



Hold Harmless 
Agreement 

School of 
Nursing 



Classroom 
Building 



Alumni 

Conference 

Service 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Contract #1 



Silo and Improvements to Sheep 
Barn completed December 13, 1954« 



Contract #2 - Roof to Manure Pit completed 
November 27, 1954. 

These projects were completed by Aquadro & Cerruti 
of Northampton at a total cost of $6,180. 

Treasurer Johnson said that a problem has arisen in 
connection with training of student nurses at the University who do 
part of their work at a Hartford hospital. Some of their studies 
involve the use of radio-active materials and the hospital wants 
the University to enter into a Hold Harmless Agreement in case of 
injury to the nurses from radiation. Such agreements may also be 
requested from other organizations as the use of radio-active 
materials grows. 

Chairman Bartlett questioned whether the Trustees could 
legally enter into such an agreement and requested the Treasurer to 
refer this matter to the Attorney General for clarification. 

President Mather reported that bids have been opened for 
the Classroom Building for which an appropriation of $1,000,000 has 
been made. The low bid is $854,769. The President complimented 
Mr. Britton, the architect, for the excellent work which he has 
done both in building design and in keeping his costs within the 
appropriation . 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson discussed the 
Alumni conference service which has been operating on the campus 
for the past few years. Under authorization of the Trustees, the 
Alumni take the responsibility for conference arrangements on the 
campus where outside groups are housed and fed. The Alumni group 



I 



2011 



;OMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

pay the University for food and room costs and make a small profit 
which goes into their general fund. They are now requesting an 
increase in their retained fee of 50 cents per room. There has 
been some conflict between their operations and the University 1 s 
Conventions Committee to the extent that this procedure should be 
reviewed at an early date. 

The President said that he was making no recommendation 
at this time but would review the matter again with those con- 
cerned on campus and then come to the Board with a recommendation 
for the handling of conventions and conferences. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2 o'clock. 




Secretary 



2012 



COMMITTEE 



U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agri- 
culture 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

May 10, 1955, 10:30 a.m., Dr. Bartlett' s Office, Boston 

Trustee Brett presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Brown, 

Crowley, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Dean Sieling, 
Director Dayton, Associate Dean 
Jeffrey, Secretary Burke 

Chairman Brett read letter from Trustee Hawes stating 
that he was unable to attend the meeting because of previous 
commitment and requesting earlier notice of committee meetings and 
meetings of the full Board. 

President Mather presented Dean Sieling who discussed the 
memorandum of agreement between the University and the United States 
Department of Agriculture relative to cooperative extension work in 
agriculture. The current memorandum has been in effect since 1914- 

In 1953 the various Federal acts appropriating funds in 
support of agricultural extension work were consolidated into one 
new act and the United States Department of Agriculture has drawn up 
a new memorandum of agreement. This has been signed by most land- 
grant colleges throughout the nation. However, Dean Sieling 
questioned whether he could sign this agreement in good faith in 
view of the difficulties which he experiences in attempting to ex- 
pend Federal funds under the various controls imposed by agents of 
the state government. The memorandum states that the Director of 
the Experiment Station and Director of the Extension Service under 
the President of the University shall have full authority for the 
expenditure of Federal funds. Dean Sieling pointed out that in 

effect this authority has been infringed upon by officers of the 



COMMITTEE 



2013 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

state government . He said that he experiences restrictions in 
making appointments, in payment of bills, in the making of contracts, 
and in other ways. 

If the Federal government wished to take an extreme stand 
in the matter, it could withdraw $600,000 worth of Federal funds 
from the University. 

Chairman Bartlett questioned whether the Dean of Agri- 
culture should precipitate action by refusing to sign the new con- 
tract. It might be better for the University to leave it to the 
Federal government to precipitate action if the Federal government 
considers that the Massachusetts director does not have enough free- 



dom. Chairman Bartlett also asked whether the director would have 
sufficient freedom if the Legislature should pass a bill giving the 
Trustees of the University direct control over appointments and 
personnel procedures. 

Dean Sieling and President Mather agreed that such legis- 
lative action would take care of the matter and it was left that 
the Dean of Agriculture would continue to carry out the cooperative 
extension program under the present memorandum of agreement and 
wait on possible relief from the Legislature. 

Dean Sieling reviewed the history of the retirement pro- 
gram for Extension Service workers. Until a few years ago, such 
workers were eligible for membership in both the Federal Retirement 
System and the State Retirement System. At that time the Trustees 
of the University considered the matter and voted against dual 
membership in public retirement systems. From that time on new 

members of the Extension Service have been allowed to enter only 



Retirement 
System 



2014 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Massachusetts Retirement System. In addition a state law has 
been passed which requires them to belong to the State Retirement 
System and not the Federal. 

However, at the present time, and contemplating a com- 
pliance date of January 1, 1956, the Federal government is insist- 
ing that state extension workers must be members of the Federal Re- 
tirement System in order to hold Federal appointment which gives 
extension workers the privilege of franked mail and which allows 
county extension headquarters to occupy space in Federal buildings 
free of rent. 

Dean Sieling raised question as to whether the state law 
should be amended so that newly- employed extension workers may have 
a choice of joining either the State or the Federal Retirement 
System. He pointed out that the Federal Retirement System is not as 
good for the employee as the State Retirement System but it would 
allow the use of the franking privilege and rent-free headquarters. 

After discussion, it was left that the administration 
would study this matter further toward two possible courses of 



action. 



Clarification from the Attorney General which 
would permit extension workers to join either 
the State or the Federal System - but not both . 

Attempt to continue the present system whereby 
extension workers will belong to the State Re- 
tirement System but the Federal government 
would continue to allow them the franking 
privilege as it has for the past several years. 



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Dean Sieling stated that the Federal government is ex- 
panding the extension and research programs in agriculture by 
appropriating additional funds for expenditure in the state. Be- 
ginning July 1, 1955 j Massachusetts will receive approximately 
$102,000 of additional Federal funds. Of this amount approximately 
$50,000 will be used to expand the extension service programs in 
marketing and home economics and about $52,000 will be allocated 
for the Experiment Station and will be used for research in 
mechanization of cranberry production, poultry nutrition, farm 
forestry, and other programs. (See attached statement) 

President Mather said that since the Trustees voted on 
the reorganization of the School of Agriculture about a year ago, 
he and Dean Sieling have been working steadily to accomplish the 
objectives outlined at that time. The main objective was to break 
down the barriers between extension work, experiment station work, 
instruction, and control service activities so that professional 
employees of the University could be used in any or all categories. 
Under this program, it was proposed to change the terms of employ- 
ment for a number of agricultural teachers so that they would be 
employed throughout the calendar year rather than for the academic 
year as in the past. 

The reorganization has been carried out in so far as re- 
search workers, extension workers and control service workers are 
concerned and their salaries have been increased for twelve 
months' service. However, it has not been possible to coordinate 
the teachers in the program with the exception of the eleven de- 
partment heads in Agriculture. The budget requested changing 13 



015 



Reorgani zation 
Plan 



2016 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



agricultural teachers from 9 to 11 months' service and the Legis- 
lature approved the changing of 10 positions. However, the 
Personnel Office has insisted that these positions be treated as 
reallocations which would mean that the teachers would receive only 
about a 3 to 5 percent salary increase for 50% more work. The ad- 
ministration has refused to accept such reallocation. 

The President said that he is seeking an amendment to 
Chapter 29 > Section 31 of the General Laws which would permit Uni- 
versity teachers in going from 9 months' service per year to 11 
months' per year to receive approximately a 15% salary increase as 
previously voted by the Board. 

President Mather said that he brought this matter before 
the committee for its information and because of the importance of 
this change in attempting to expend properly the additional 
$102,000 which will be available for agriculture beginning July 1. 
It will be less expensive for the Commonwealth if presently- employed 
teachers can be utilized through the summer months rather than if 
all the new funds must be spent for the employment of new persons. 

President Mather recalled that Dr. Van Meter in his 
inaugural address called for change of name of the present School 
of Agriculture to College of Agriculture. President Mather also 
called for this change in his inaugural address. He pointed out 
that this is the traditional pattern of organization in better 
land-grant universities and that as other schools of the Univer- 
sity developed in strength, he would call for similar action for 
Engineering, Business Administration, and possibly others. He 

pointed out that the Trustees have voted to consolidate the 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

present School of Liberal Arts and the. present School of Science 

into a College of Arts and Science and this consolidation vill be 

accomplished as soon as a new Dean of Arts and Science is employed. 

After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees change the 
name of the present School of Agriculture 
and Horticulture to College of Agriculture 
effective July 1, 1955. 

President Mather announced that the University has re- 
ceived an offer of $50,000 from Miss Harriet G. Bird of Stow, 
Treasurer of Red Acre Farm Inc. "to be used to construct a building 
for the investigation of health problems of large animals." The 
President pointed out that the University has a veterinary staff 
to carry out such work and there is considerable demand from the 
Farm Bureau and other groups for this activity. At the present 
time the University has facilities only for investigation of health 
problems of small animals, mainly poultry. It has no place to hold 
diseased animals for study. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept with 

appreciation the gift of Miss Harriet G. Bird 
of $50,000 for construction of a building for 
the investigation of health problems of large 
animals. 

President Mather said that with the retirement of Professqr 

Victor A. Pice, Head of the Department of Animal Husbandry, the 

time has cocie to combine this department with the Department of 

Dairy Industry and, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
President to combine the currently separate 
departments of Dairy Industry and Animal 
Husbandry into a Department of Dairy and 
Animal Science under one head. 



College of 

Agriculture 



Gift of 
Harriet G. 
Bird 



Department of 
Dairy and 
Animal Science 



2018 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 1 o'clock. 




j Secretary 



EXPANDED AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND EXTENSION PROGRAMS 

1955-1956 

Information available from the Office of Experiment Stations and the Federal 
Extension Office indicates that the support for research and extension programs 
will be increased for Massachusetts in the amount of $44,000 for each activity 
July 1, 1955. In addition, some regional research funds will be allocated to 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, and Title II funds will be 
allocated to the Extension Service. 

The following general subject matter areas have been selected as those needing 
expanded programs of research and extension: 

EXTENSION SERVICE 

I. Home Economics Communications. --More adequate information needs to be 
developed for use by the press in the subject of Home Economics, particularly 
the application of research findings and new developments to the management of 
homes through better consumer education and food evaluation. 

II. Marketing. --A consolidation of the marketing program should be ac- 
complished to take full advantage of the research and educational programs that 
are already being supported in this area. Further expansion needs to be made 
at the retailer level of marketing so that the marketing of farm produce will 
be under study and development at all levels from the producer to the consumer. 

RESEARCH 

I. Cranberry Mechanization. --In order to reduce costs in the production 
of cranberries and to place a higher quality fruit on the market it is believed 
that mechanization is the next logical development. Since the cranberry industry 
is relatively small, machinery manufacturers that ordinarily supply equipment to 
producers are not interested in this particular field and therefore it becomes 
the responsibility of this Experiment Station to develop needed mechanical 
improvements. 

II. Poultry Nutrition. --The poultry industry is the largest agricultural 
industry in Massachusetts. Research in poultry nutrition has not been emphasized 
here and this program needs to be developed to best serve the industry. 

III. Farm Forestry. --Sixty-five per cent of Massachusetts is covered with 
trees. Each farm has a wood lot or other resources in trees that needs to be 
developed so that the income from the sale of forestry products can make a 
substantial contribution to the total economic operations of the farm. No 
research has been supported in this area for the past 25 years since the 
Northeastern Experiment Station was moved from Amherst. 

IV. Evaluation of Forages. — Forage production seems to be the most logical 
way for the New England States to stay in the dairy business and the production 
of high quality forage seems to offer a way to compete with the western grain 
producing areas in the production of milk. Forages have been under study for 
a number of years from the standpoint of production but studies need to be 



-2 
made on the value of forage crops as superior feed for dairy cattle. 

V. Irrigation. — Irrigation offers a type of insurance in the production 
of various agricultural crops and additional research funds from regional 
sources may be made available for a cooperative study to include fundamental 
investigations about the influence of irrigation on various crops. 

VI. Dairy Cattle Breeding. — Improvement of dairy cattle is another method 
of improving the efficiency in dairy farming. A regional project in cooperation 
with the 11 other northeastern states is planned. 

VII. Marketing Ornamental Nursery Products. — Existing knowledge of the 
marketing of nursery products in New England is meager. Lack of knowledge 
is particularly critical in this area and the industry has urgent need for 
research to carry out production and marketing programs. 

VIII. Merchandizing Dairy Products. — There is need to evaluate the potential 
impact on the milk distribution system with particular attention on retailer 
and consumer acceptance, the distribution margin and milk consumption, and 
to evaluate the possibility of reducing distribution costs by providing price 
incentives to consumers to increase the size of their orders. 



5/9/55 






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MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS & GROUNDS 
May 11, 1955, 10:00 a.m., Dr. Bartlett 1 s Office, Boston 

Trustee Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, McDermott, 
Taber, Vhitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and read- 
ing of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Mr. Sidney Shurcliff presented his preliminary plans 
toward the development of a master plan for the University. He dis- 
played a map showing the present buildings, proposed new buildings, 
proposed new roads, parking areas, and discussed with the committee 
some of the problems involved in the development of a university 
for 10,000 students. He pointed out that the preliminary plans are 
not quite complete but that he will soon deliver complete prelimi- 
nary plans together with written recommendations for study by the 
Board of Trustees. When the Trustees have made such comments and 
suggestions as they care to make, he can then undertake the prepara- 
tion of final plans. 

It was agreed that copies will be delivered to members of 
the Board in time for study and action in June. 

Mr. Niels H. Larsen, consulting architect, was present 
during this discussion and gave his general endorsement of the plans 
as presented by Mr. Shurcliff. Mr. Larsen was invited to remain for 
the balance of the meeting. 

Mr. Donald Ritchie presented plans for the Public Health 
building which is being designed as the first part of a Science 
Center building. He also showed preliminary sketches of his con- 
ceot of the entire Science Center. 



2019 



Master Plan 



2020 



COMMITTEE 



Science 
Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The committee asked Mr. Larsen whether such a large build- 
ing as the Science Center would be suitable for the campus and 
particularly for the proposed location. Mr. Larsen answered that 
in his opinion the building must be designed as one large unit both 
for reasons of economy and reasons of joint use of facilities by 
the various science departments. He said the building has been de- 
signed so that the large mass will be broken up and he believes it 
is altogether fitting. 

President Mather said that in the long run the University 
must have more functional buildings of larger size. It is wrong to 
deprive the youngsters of education to build fancy chimneys on 
smaller buildings. He pointed out the progressive changes in dormi- 
tory design from Butterfield dormitory to Van Meter dormitory and 
showed how the University has been able to get more for its money 
and hence serve more youngsters through functional design. 

President Mather also pointed out a growing discrepancy 
between appropriations for new construction and appropriations for 
maintenance. The University now has $10,000,000 available for con- 
struction but the Legislature continues to cut the maintenance 
appropriation. The President said that a better balance between 
construction and maintenance must be worked out if the University 
is to forge ahead. 

Trustee Whitmore said he objects to flat roof constructior. 
and wants building designs kept as far as possible from factory- 
type construction. Trustee Taber suggested the possibility of 
another location for such a large building as the Science Center. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Lars en reiterated his belief that this building can 
be constructed satisfactorily in the proposed site. He pointed out 
that the projection shown by the architect would be seen only from 
an airplane and that the building will look much better at eye 



level. 



In answer to question from Chairman Vhitmore, Mr. Ritchie 



said that he is firmly convinced that his design for the Public 
Health building is within the appropriation. Treasurer Johnson 
said that the building has been designed to meet all department re- 
quirements and the needs of State Department of Public Health. 

Representatives of Ames, Childs and Graves presented pre- 
liminary plans for a $2, 000, 000 addition to the Library. This will 
encompass approximately 750,000 cubic feet, will provide for 
4-00,000 volumes and 360 readers. The plans are so drawn that all 
the additional stacks do not need to go in the building at once. 
Rooms can be used for reading or other purposes until additional 
stacks are needed. 

President Mather said that this addition to the Library 
will help the University to catch up in services to the present stu- 
dent body. Currently the Library seats only 6% of the students as 
against American Library Association standards of 25 to 35 percent. 
The number of books is also inadequate; in fact in a recent survey o{f 
71 comparable libraries, the University of Massachusetts ranks about 
63th in 15 different criteria of excellence. He said that further 
additions to the Library must be made as the student body grows. 

Mr. Pierce and Mr. Wick of Shepley & Bulfinch presented 
preliminary plans for a $2,000,000 Liberal Arts building which will 



202 



Goodell 
Library 



Liberal Arts 
building 



Student 
Union 

building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

provide facilities to handle 2,000 students an hour. In order to 
keep the building within the appropriation, there has been a re- 
committee duction in the classroom space below the original askings of the 



various Liberal Arts departments. 

President Mather said that this reduction in askings 
should in no way deter the Trustees from proceeding with the con- 
struction of this building. Further facilities vill be needed and 
are planned for over the next several years. Construction of this 
building will enable the University to destroy several fire-trap 
structures; plans for construction should proceed as rapidly as 



possible. 



In answer to question from Chairman Whitmore, Mr. Pierce 



and Mr. Wick said that they believe their plans are within the 
appropriated funds. However, they emphasized that the plans have 
not yet gone to their estimator and they would reserve final opinion 
as to cost until their estimator has completed his checks. 

They said the building should be ready for bid by 
January I, 1956 and should be completed by September of 1957. In 
response to suggestions from members of the committee, they agreed 
to restud.y the eastern facade of the building to see if the long 
straight lines can be broken for additional interest. 

Louis ¥. Ross presented final plans for the $2,000,000 
Student Union building. It is expected that bids will go out 
June 1, 1955 and the building should be completed by the fall of 
1956. Mr. Larsen commented that the plans of Mr. Ross fit into the 
landscape and the interior planning is well done. 



rOMMITTEE 



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2023 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Shaw of Perry, Shaw, Hepburn, Kehoe and Dean pre- 
sented final plans for the Women 1 s Physical Education building. 
He estimated that the building will take \L months for construction, 
2 months for advertising and letting of contract. The building 
should be completed by September of 1957. 

The committee considered the question of purchasing 
electricity from Western Massachusetts Electric Company versus con- 
struction of facilities for additional production on the campus. 
This matter was discussed by the Executive Committee of the Board 
under date of April 26 with the understanding that further action 
would be taken at the May meeting of the Board. 

Trustee Brett said that he has investigated the electric 
rates paid by the Hood Rubber Company and in view of the amount and 
the timing of the University power demands, he believes that the 
proposed rate of 1.8£ KW by the Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company is fair. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the 1.80 KW rate pro- 
posed by Western Massachusetts Electric Company is based on the 
fact that Western Massachusetts Electric will not supply all the 
electric needs of the University. The University will continue to 
operate its present generators and will purchase from Western 
Massachusetts Electric only such electricity as will be needed in 
excess of University production or during off seasons when the 
University is not heating the buildings. 

The Treasurer has checked rates at Amherst College which 
are higher than those of the University and rates at Mt. Holyoke 

College which buys electricity from South Hadley at a slightly 
higher rate than that proposed for the University. 



Women x s 
Physical 
Education 
building 



Power versus 

generating 

plant 



2024 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer said that he had also heard from Mr. Haigis 
who has checked electric rates of companies with which he is con- 
cerned. Mr. Haigis feels that the rate proposed for the University- 
is not out of line. 

Mr. Merrill of Merrill Associates is convinced that the 
rate is the lowest possible which can be obtained from the electric 
company. Mr. Donovan, the state engineer, feels that the rate is 
favorable. Treasurer Johnson has also approached Western Massa- 
chusetts Electric to see if they will cut the rate further and they 
will not do so. However, they might consider a contract somewhat 
shorter than the ten years proposed. 

Treasurer Johnson reminded the Trustees that the Univer- 
sity will need more boilers to heat the additional buildings re- 
gardless of the power problem. Studies have been made of oil versus 
coal firing for the new boilers. Merrill Associates recommend oil 
for the new boilers but to continue on coal for the present boilers 
There is little difference in cost of operating. However the State 
Purchasing Agent advises coal firing even though boilers for coal 
would cost $200,000 more than oil fired boilers. He bases his 
recommendation upon the difficulty of obtaining a good supply of 
oil especially during the winter months in Amherst. Also, that in 
the event of war, coal is more dependable. The University has been 
selected as the site for state government if Boston must be 
abandoned. 

The Treasurer pointed out that if the University enters 
into contract with Western Massachusetts Electric for furnishing 

of additional power needs, the University can save $ 500, 000 in 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



capital outlay which would have been used for new generating 
facilities. 

It was agreed that the committee would meet on Monday, 
May 16, at 11 o'clock at the Hotel Statler to discuss the five-year 
capital outlay program of the University. Copies of the proposed 
program were presented to each member of the committee for study 
in advance of this meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 



2025 



Kt 




_£tecretary 



2026 



COMMITTEE 



Capital 

Outlay 

Program 



Five-Year 

Building 

Program 



Gift 



Bird, 
Harriet G, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF ADJOURNED TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 
ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 16, 1955> 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Trustee Vhitmore presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Taber, Vhitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

The committee considered the proposed capital outlay pro- 
gram for the five-year period beginning July 1, 1956 and it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees approve a 
capital outlay program for the year be- 
ginning July 1, 1956 in the amount of 
16,070,000 for 12 items as listed on the 
attached statement. 



It was also unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the administration to submit the five-year 
program to the Division of Building Con- 
struction in the amount of ^31,B90,000 as 
listed on the attached schedule. 

The committee then considered architects for the 

-f. 50, 000 building to be constructed for the investigation of health 

problems of large animals. This building would result from gift of 

Miss Harriet G. Bird of Stow, Treasurer of Red Acre Farm Inc. and 

it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees employ 
McClintock and Craig of Springfield. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 




"7^ 



__ _J Secretary 



[ 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 16, 1955, 12M, Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, Mrs. McNamara, Perry, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTED : To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last previous 
meeting. 

The committee reviewed proposed changes in the program 

of study resulting from recommendations of the University 

Committee on Course of Study and supported by President Mather. 

After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the attached course changes. 

President Mather reviewed the procedures by which the 
University has sought candidates for the position of Provost and 
the position of Dean of the College of Arts and Science. 

A committee of the Educational Policies Council has 
screened candidates for the position of Provost, has conducted a 
large number of interviews, and has brought candidates to the 
campus for interview by the entire Educational Policies Council. 

At the same time a committee composed of four elected 
members from the School of Arts and four from the School of Science 
has been seeking candidates for the Deans hip position. They con- 
sidered 80 candidates and brought 13 to the campus for interview. 
After discussion and on the recommendation of President Mather, it 

was unanimously 



2027 



Courses of 
Study 



2028 



COMMITTEE 

McCune, Shannon 
Provost 



Cahill, Fred V. 

Dean of Arts 
and Science 



Sevoian, 
Martin 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Dr. Shannon McCune as Provost of the 
University effective September 1, 1955 
at annual salary of * 10,380. 

Dr. McCune is Head of the Department of Geography at 

Colgate University and Administrative Assistant to the President 



of Colgate. 



Also on the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Dr. Fred V. Cahill as J-'ean of the College 
of Arts and Science effective June 15, 1955 
at annual salary of $8,530. 



Dr. Cahill is Professor of Government at the University. 
On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Dr. Martin Sevoian as Professor of 
Veterinary Science "A" effective 
August 1, 1955 at annual salary of 
$7,080. 

President Mather said that with the appointment of 
Dr. Cahill as Dean of the College of Arts and Science, Professor 
Frank Prentice Rand is being relieved as Acting Dean of the School 
of Liberal Arts. Professor Rand has served as Acting Dean for the 
p§.st seven years and has served the University for IX years. He 
has been the most outstanding person on the campus in the develop- 
ment and maintenance of the Liberal Arts program and in the formu- 
lation and administration of academic activities. He has contri- 
buted immeasurably to the cultural life of the community. The 
University Committee on Honorary Degrees has unanimously voted to 
recommend the awarding of the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters to 



CHANGES IB THE COURSE OF STODX 

Romance i Ljaaguagee 

revive a dropped, course formerly taught ass 
FRENCH 7 (I) 8 (II) INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

lacted readings from representative French literary works and a thorough 
review and study of grammar. Compositions, reports, outside reading. In- 
tensive oral practice. 

3 class hours j 1 laboratory period Credit, 

Prerequisites* 2-3 years of high school French j as substantiated by place- 
ment examination* 

To offer the following new courses i 

FRENCH 25 (I) 26 (XI) INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE 

study of the outstanding literary trends with readings from representa- 
tive masterpieces of the literature from the Middle Ages to the present., 
ectures, reports and discussion* Prerequisite French 7, 3 



L 



ITALIA!? 27 (I) 28 (II) ORAL ITALIAN 

This course is Intended for those students who wish to perfect their 

knowledge of the spoken language. Prerequisites, Italian 5, 6 or special 

permission of the Department 



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X* 



I 



TALXAH 25 (X) 26 (II) IKTRODUCTION TO ITALIA33 LITERATURE 
This course traces the development of Italian literature from the XJIth 
through the 20th centuries. Lectures p readings from some of the most im- 
portant works, reports and discussions. The course is conducted in Italian* 
Prerequisites, Italian 5* 6 or special permission of the Department 

SPANISH 63 (I) 64 (II) AD7AECED SPAEISH COMPOSITION AND SYNTAX 
A study of syntax and. idioms , and of those more advanced and difficult 
elements which constitute styli sties, in abundance of original composition 
leads the student to express himself clearly, logically and fluently in 
living Spanish. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in Spanish and to 
other qualified students by special permission of the department. 
Prerequisites 3 Spanish 9 5 10 and at least one course in Spanish literature. 

SPANISH 85 (I) 86 (II) CERVANTES. 

Reading of Don Quixotes lectures, discussions, collateral readings and re- 
ports. The course is conducted in Spanish. 
Prerequisites, Spanish 25> 26 or special permission of the Department. 

Olericulture 

To change Olericulture 73, ConKiercial Olericulture, to 

OLERICULTURE 52 (IX) COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE PRODUCTION 

This course deals with the commercial production of the more important 

vegetable crops grown out of doors and under glass, including the principles 

basic to vegetable farm organization and management, plant growing, 

varieties, soil management, cultivation, weed control, irrigation and other 

special cultural practices. Trips to nearby farms will be required. 

2 class hours; 1-2 hr» laboratory periods Credit, 3 

8*00-8*50 Mon., Frt. 3:00-4* 50 Fri, Mr. Johnson 



I 



To offer the following new courses 

OLEKXCULTUEE SO (II) SPECIAL PBOBLSiS. 

ka advanced study of specific problems relative to the production and 

bating of vegetable crops, including a review of basic research reports 9 
current literature and in the presentation of written and oral reports by 
each student working under a specific member of the Department staff. 

1 class hour.? 4. laboratory hours. Credit* 3 
By arrangement Mr. Snyder & Department 

To drop Horticulture 1* Plant Propagation* and to substitute 
HamCOLTOEE 2 BASIC HORTICULTURE 

introductory course for those interested in acquiring some basic 
owledge of horti culturally Important plants. This is concerned with the 
structure* flowering and fruiting habits* propagation* training* pruning* 
and storage of many of our economic plaits as well as an introductory 
discussion of the influence of soil* nutritional status* environmental 
factors and growth regulatirg substances on their development* 

2 Class hours* 1 2-hr* laboratory 



Pom ology 

To change Pomology 53 * General Pomology* to? 
POMOLOGY 25 (l) lUTBQDOCTOFY POMOLOGY. 

This course deals with modern tree fruit production including varieties 
orchard sites &..nd soils,, planting systems* soil management* fertilizers* 
bearing habits* pruning* pollination* thinning* pest control and handling 
the crop* The content of this course should be of value to students major- 
ing in allied fields. 
2 class hours; 1 2-hr. laboratory period. Credit* 3 



I 



Tc change Pomology 81-82, Advanced Pomology* to the following two courses s 
POMOLOGY 79 (I) ADVANCED POMOLOGY (1956-57) 

Special attention is given to more important findings of research dealing 
with the interrelation of stock and scion* temperature influences, water 
relationships and the mineral nutrition of fruit plants. The geography of 
world fruit production is also considered. Given in alternate years. 
Prerequisite Pomology 25 or equivalent. Credit* 3 

2 class hours; 1 2-hr* laboratory period. 

POMOLOGY 81 (I) ADVAKCBD POMOLOGY (1957-58) 

critical study of the more important research dealing with pollination* 
fruit set and thinning* preharvest drop* biennial bearing* and the 
physiology of fruit during storage. The location and objectives of fruit 
breeding programs in the United States are also discussed. Given in 
alternate years * 

Prerequisite Pomology 25 or equivalent. Credit* 3 

2 class hours; I 2-hr. laboratory period. 

To change Pomology 77 (I)* Commercial Pomology, to POMOLOGY 77 (1) FRUIT 
MAFK2TOJG (1957-53) 

This course consists of a critical study of the handling of fruit from tree 
to consumer* including such phases as the physiology of fruit as related to 
harvesting procedure* also fruit grades and grading* packing* storing and 
merchandizing. Given in alternate years* 



To change Pomology 84. (II), Seminar, to 
POMOLOGY 84 (II) SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN POMOLOGY 

Each student will investigate an individual problem pertinent to hie 
future objectives. Reports on these student problems and on current 
pomological research will be presented at the weekly class hours. 
Prerequisites Pomology 79 and 81 ♦ Credit, 3 

1 class hour 1 4- laboratory hours. 



Geology 

To e^qpasid Geology 51 (I), Mineralogy, to a two semester course as follows! 
GEOLOGY 51 (I) 52 (II) MINERALOGY 

A course designed to meet the needs of students majoring in geology and 
lied, fields. Tho first ■semester 1 s work deals with all of the mineral 
classes with the exception of the silicate group which lias been reserved 
for the second semester. 

Prerequisites Chemistry I and II Credit, 

1 class hour; 2 2-hr. laboratory periods. 



Home Economies 

To drop Home Economics 1, Introduction to Home Economics, and to substitute 
the following course, with the proviso that no student be permitted to take 
both Rome Economics XI and Home Economics 80 for credits 
HOME ECONOMICS II (I) SUTHEKICS 

A study of the influences of family living experiences upon personality de- 
velopment with emphasis upon self-understanding as a prerequisite to healthy 
adjustment in present and future life of the student » A discussion of the 
knowledge and skills necessary for successful home-making involving marriage 
and parenthood. 
3 class hours. Credit, 3 

To drop Home Economics 2, Clothing Selection, and to substitute the follow- 
ing courses HOME ECONOMICS 12 (II) CONSUMER CL0THI1 G PROBLEMS 
This course consists of three fundamental approaches to clothing problems s 
consumer education in relation to economics in the field of ready-to-wear; 
$ study of art and psychology applied to the selection of apparelj basic 
principles of construction. A protest is offered, during the first semester, 
to women who have had previous study or experience in this field. Adjust- 
ments in assignments will be made according to ability. 
2 class hoursf 1 2-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3 

Surging 

To approve the following three courses from the Division of Nursing. These 
courses are substantially the same as others already approved for that 
curriculum but they are intended for Graduate Nurses and it is deemed ad- 
visable to have them appear under separate number and title to avoid con- 
fusion in transcriptes 



I 



SKiRSING 70 (G.N.) MANAGEMENT OF THE HOSPITAL NURSING UNIT 
General principles of management are applied to management of patient care 
in the hospital nursing unit, Baphasis . is placed upon the nurse as a member 
of the health and nursing team* The course is planned for the potential 
head nurse, the experienced head nurse without forma! preparation ana/or the 
staff nurse interested in leadership of the nursing team* By permission of 
instructor. Credit 9 2 

HORSING 71 (G.N.) NEWER CONCEPTS IN MATERNAL AMD CHILD CARS 
A concept of family centered care is developed through discussion of newer 
methods of maternal and new born carej consideration of the relationship of 
basic philosophies and principles of child care to recent developments in 
the field of pediatric nursing! and a beginning study of the meaning of ill- 
ness to the child., his parents and the nurse. By permission of instructor. 

Credit, 2 

HORSING 72 (G.N.) PERSONNEL PROGRAMS IH SCHOOLS OF NURSING 

An appraisal of the principles, practices and problems related to the organiza- 
tion and implementation of effective student personnel services within a 
school of nursing. Techniques used in the selection and counseling of stu- 
dents are demonstrated. Practice is given in the evaluation of selected stu- 
dent personnel programs. By permission of instructor. 

Credit, 2 

Li-beral Arts 

?o approve the following courses from the School of Liberal Arts? 
GOVERNMENT 55 (S) THE PRESIDENCY IK AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (to be given in 
Sutamer School only) The growth of the executive in U. S. Government. Vary- 
ing conceptions of the presidential office. Constitutional and political as- 
pects of the office in legislation, administration and conduct of foreign 
and military affairs. President as party leader. 
Prerequisite Government 25* Credit, 3 

EDUCATION 81 (S) TEACHING FOREIGN LANGUAGE IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL (to be given 
in Summer School only) The latest techniques, methods, and materials will 
be presented by instructors from the Departments of Education and Foreign 
Language. (For trainees in elementary education or elementary teachers who 
have a major in foreign language) Credit, 3 

SOCIOLOGY 26. PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY 

A survey of the theoretical development of major sociological concepts with 

emphasis on American sociologists and -their contributions. Reading and 

analysis of monographs utilizing the sociological frame of reference for 

selected areas. 

3 class hours. Credit, 3 



I 



Mathematics 

■WW^ IJ Il tW IIII I I I^ M M TfclliMH i I H 

To authorize the Mathematics Department • to continue for one more year (1955- 
to experiment with six sections in freshman Mathematics for Liberal Arts 
majors with course descriptions as follows? 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Mathematics I. Basic set- theoretic and axiomatic 
concepts 9 number systems and equations. A study of elementary functions* 
algebraically and by the methods of analytic geometry. 

Mathematics 2, Introductory Mathematics II. A. terminal course intended for 
students whose curriculum calls for just one year of Mathematics. A continua- 
tion of Mathematics 1-, including topics from the calculus, statistics and 

mathematics of finance* 

Mathematics U* Introductory Mathematics IV. A continuation of Mathematics 1 
for those students intending to take further courses in Mathematics. Analytic 
geometry and trigonometry. 



I 



I 



:OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Professor Rand at the June commencement. The committtee 



unanimously 



"~:~r: : 



To recommend that the Trustees rd the 
degree Doctor of Humane Letters to Frank 
Prentice Band at the June com. ,-nt 
in 1955. 



It was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees change the 
sabbatical leave granted to Dr. Vernon P. 
Helming from one year at half pay to one 
semester at full pay for study in Europe. 
Leave is to be taken during the spring of 
1956 subject to the usual conditions per- 
taining to sabbatical leaves. 



On the recommendation of President Mather, it v : 



unanimously 

".I'll : To recommend that the Trustees name Pro- 
fessor Victor A. Bice, Professor of Animal 
Husbandry Emeritus effective on his retire- 
ment August 31, 1955. 

President Mather said that the Committee on Agriculture 
and Horticulture which would be reporting later in the day is 
recommending the consolid _ jf the present sepaj - "_ _ talents 
of Dairy Industry and Animal Hus' iry on the retirement of Pro- 
fessor Pice as Head of the Department of Animal Busbandry. On 



rec: 3 "ion of t President, it 



dmously 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Dr. Denzel J. Hankinson, currently Head 
of the Department of I Ind stry, to 
Head of the Department of Dairy and 
Animal Science effective September 1, 1955. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




. 



1 



Rand, .-rank 
Prentice 

norary 5 e a ree 
otor of 

e Letters 



Helming, 
Vernon ?. 

tical 

ve 



.ire, Victor A. 

:r of 
Lmal Hue 
Emeritus 



:n, 

-1 -J. 

3 of 

■--.i.-'ial 
i 3-ce 



2030 



COMMITTEE 



Library 
addition 



Liberal 

Arts 

building 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

June 24, 1955 > 10:30 a.m., Dining Commons, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT ; Trustees Whitmore, Bartlett, Brett, 
Haigis, Taber, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Treasurer Johnson said that the Legislature seems about 
to pass appropriations for (l) $38,000 for plans for addition to 
the Library, (2) $2, 000, 000 construction of the Liberal Arts build- 
ing and (3) $250,000 construction of the vegetable gardening build- 
ing and greenhouse. The Trustees have 21 days from the time of 
appropriation in which to name architects for these projects. 
After that time the Commission on Administration and Finance may 
name architects. After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees employ 
Ames and Graves of Boston to prepare 
working plans and specifications for 
the proposed addition to the Library. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees employ 
Shepley, ' Bulfinch, Richardson, Abbott 
of Boston to prepare working plans and 
specifications for the proposed Liberal 
Arts building. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the trustees approve 
architects for the vegetable gardening 
building and greenhouse in the follow- 
ing priority order: 

1. Clinton Goodwin of Haverhill 

2. Maloney & Tessier of Springfield 
3» William B» Colleary of Centerville 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson said that it is expected that 

$1,169,000 will also be appropriated for additions to the boiler 

capacity in the power plant of the University and after discussion, 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees employ 

Merrill Associates of Boston to prepare 
working plans and specifications for addi- 
tions to the boiler capacity. 

President Mather said that Miss Harriet G. Bird of Stow 
has turned over $4-5,000 to the University arid expects to present an 
additional $5,000 shortly for the construction of a building for 
the investigation of health problems of large animals. 

Treasurer Johnson said that earlier it was expected that 
this building would be constructed as a separate unit on the campus 
and for this reason the administration had recommended employment 
of McClintock and Craig of Springfield. Although the Trustees 
voted to authorize employment of McClintock and Craig, the firm was 
never notified of the selection as meanwhile it became evident that 
the building would be more useful if it were constructed as an 
addition to the present animal-holding pens behind Paige Laboratory 
The architect for these pens was Louis V. Ross of Boston and it 
seems best to employ Mr, Ross to add a wing to his building. 

Members of the committee raised question as to possible 
reaction of McClintock and Craig. Treasurer Johnson said that 
since the building is not a large or expensive building, he was 
sure that McClintock and Craig would have no objection ana that the 
University is in no way committed to this firm. After discussion, 
it was 



2031 



Power 
Plant 

addition 



Gift 



Bird, Harriet 
G. 



Animal 
Health 
building 



2032 



COMMITTEE 



Science 
Center 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To recommend that the Trustees rescind 
previous vote naming McClintock and Craig 
of Springfield as architects for the pro- 
posed animal health building. 



and it was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name Louis 
W. Ross of Boston for construction of the 
building for investigation of health 
problems of large animals and to authorize 
the Treasurer to enter into contract with 
Mr. Ross in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees when the $50,000 fund is in 
hand. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

authorize construction of the animal health 
building resulting from gift of Miss 
Harriet G. Bird as an addition to the 
animal holding pens near Paige Laboratory. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name James 

H. Ritchie Associates of Boston as architect 

for the second unit of the Science Center 

to make a preliminary study and cost estimate. 

There was discussion of the location of the new vegetable 

gardening building and greenhouse. Treasurer Johnson recalled 

that the Trustees had earlier voted to locate this building near 

French Hall. At that time it was thought that the building would 

become part of a large plant-science center. Since that time the 

area has been studied more carefully and the Head of the Geology 

Department of the University has stated that the proposed area is 

the bed of a former glacial lake and would require very expensive 

footings. Also with the study of the campus by the master 

planners, it becomes evident that the agricultural unit should be 

moved to the northwest portion of the campus. Furthermore, the 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



area between French and Fernald Halls will be needed for parking 

to accommodate employees and visitors at the Science Center, The 

committee called in Dr. Sieling, Dean of Agriculture, and Professor 

Snyder, Head of the Department of Vegetable Gardening, to discuss 

the location of the vegetable gardening building. After discussion, 

it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees rescind 
previous vote locating the vegetable 
gardening building near French Hall and 
authorize the construction of the build- 
ing to the west of the engineering group 
and Paige Laboratory. 

President Mather reported that the Legislature is about 

to appropriate $12,000 for the purchase of the Montague property 



and it was 



VOTED: 



To authorize the Treasurer, in the name 
of and for the Board of Trustees, to take 
up the option which the Trustees now hold 
for purchase of the Montague property. 



Trustee Brett said that the bill authorizing the Massa- 
chusetts Building Association to construct two more dormitories has 
been passed by the Legislature. He said that the Association 
would like to have instructions from the Trustees as to completion 
dates. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request the 
Massachusetts Building Association to pro- 
ceed immediately with construction of the 
remaining portion of Van Meter dormitory 
aiming for completion date by September of 
1956. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request the 
Massachusetts Building Association to defer 
any further construction of dormitories pend- 
ing future authorization from the Board. 



2033 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
building 



Montague 
property 



Dormitories 



Van Meter 
House 



Dormitories 



2034 



COMMITTEE 



Student 
Union 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Brett said that the $2,000,000 worth of bonds 
for the Student Union Building have been sold and the Massachusetts 
Building Association is now ready to proceed with construction. 



It was 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees enter into 
lease agreement with the Massachusetts 
Building Association covering lease of 
land and lease of the Student Union Build- 



ing. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




Ty^-^^\ 



Secretary 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

June 2Lr 9 1955> 12:30 p.m., Dining Commons, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Bartlett, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 

President Mather said that Professor Frank Prentice 

Rand, Head of the Department of English has asked to be relieved 

of the headship of this department and to remain in service as a 

full Professor as he is nearing the retirement age. After 

discussion and on recommendation of the former Acting Dean of 

•v. 

Liberal A<rts, of the present Dean^of - the College of Arts and 

Science, and of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Dr. Maxwell H. Goldberg from Professor 
to Head of the Department of English, 
effective September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



2035 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Dr. Stow ell C. Goding from Professor to 
Head of the Department of Romance 
Languages, effective September 1, 1955. 



Dr. Goding succeeds Dr. Charles F. Fraker who is retiring August 
31, 1955. 

President Mather said that with the consolidation of the 
Departments of Dairy Industry and Animal Husbandry into one de- 
partment, a Head of Department position vacated through the retire- 
ment of Professor Rice is available for filling and that in his 
judgment this position should be used in the College of Arts and 



Frank 

Prentice 

Rand 



Maxwell H. 
Goldberg 



Stowell C. 
Goding 



2036 



COMMITTEE 



, J. Henry 
Korson 



Clarence 
W. Shute 



Albert E, 
Goss 



New 
Courses 



Master of 
Science in 
Chemical 
Engineering 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Science. Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees use the de- 
partment headship vacated by Professor Rice 
to promote Dr. J. Henry Korson from Pro- 
fessor to Head of the Department of Sociology, 
effective September 1, 1955. 



On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees use the Pro- 
fessorship vacated by promotion of Dr. Korson 
to promote Dr. Clarence W. Shute from 
Associate Professor to Professor of 
Philosophy, effective September 1, 1955 • 



On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees use the Pro- 
fessorship vacated by Dr. Goding for the 
promotion of Albert E. Goss from Associate 
Professor to Professor of Psychology, 
effective September 1, 1955. 

On the recommendation of the University Course of Study 

Committee and of President Mather, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following new courses and changes in the 
course of study. (See attached) 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council and 

of President Mather, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
offering of a new degree, Master of Science 
in Chemical Engineering, and approve the 
attached curriculum for this degree. 



The meeting was/^cDjourned at 1 o'clock. 




Secretary 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

September 29, 1955, 2:00 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT; Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Crowley, 
Desmond, Mrs. McNamara, Perry, 
President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Mr. Julian M. Fore as Head of the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Engineering effective 
October 3, 1955 at annual salary of $7630. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that Professor Fred C. Ellert 
who has been Acting Head of the Department 
of German be confirmed as Head of the De- 
partment effective September 1, 1955 ♦ 

President Mather said that for some years there has been 

increasing emphasis on offerings in Speech in the Department of 

English. This section of the department has grown to five members 

offering a wide range of courses including radio and television. 

The English Department and the College of Arts and Science feel 

that the time has come to establish Speech as a separate department. 

After discussion and on the recommendation of the President, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees establish a 
Department of Speech in the College of 
Arts and Science and name Professor Arthur 
E. Niedeck as Head of the Department 
effective September 1, 1955 ? -with the under- 
standing that he will receive proper in- 
crease in salary as soon as budget provisions 
may allow. 



2037 



Julian M. Fore, 
Head Dept. 
Agricultural 
Engineering 



Fred C. Ellert, 
Head Dept. of 
German 



Arthur E. 
Niedeck, 
Head Dept. 
of Speech 



2038 



COMMITTEE 



Bureau of 
Government 
Be search 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that as a result of demand on the 
part of local government units, the Legislature has voted to es- 
tablish a Government Research Bureau at the University and has 
appropriated funds in the amount of $18,000 for the current fiscal 
year. The purpose of the bureau will be to assist Boards of Se- 
lectmen, town officers, and others in undertaking research studies 
as may be needed. After discussion and on the recommendation of 
the President, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees establish a 
Bureau of Government Research responsible 
directly to the Provost and through him to 
the President of the University effective 
October 1, 1955. 

President Mather said that partly as a result of increased 
interest in the Summer Session and partly as a result of veterans 
and others entering the University in the second semester rather 
than the first semester, a considerable number of students are com- 
pleting the academic requirements for the degree at the end of the 
summer period or at the end of the first semester. In the past 
these students have been required to wait until the June commence- 
ment to receive their degree. Meantime they must explain to em- 
ployers and others interested that they have earned a degree but 
have not yet received it. Furthermore, by the following June many 
may be employed in far parts of the country or in the armed forces. 
The President feels that it would be more appropriate to allow the 
students to receive their degrees shortly after they are earned. 
After discussion and on the recommendation of the President, it was 
unanimously 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve award- 
ing of earned degrees at the end of the summer 
session and at the end of the first semester 
as well as at the annual commencement in June, 
with the understanding that students who com- 
plete their work at the end of the summer or at 
the end of the first semester be given the 
option of receiving the degree then as voted 
individually by the faculty and by the Board 
of Trustees or of receiving the degree at the 
following June commencement. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees name Dr. Charles 
F. Fraker, Professor of Romance Languages 
Emeritus, effective on his retirement August 
31, 1955. 



On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees name S. Church 
Hubbard, Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Emeritus, effective on his retirement 
August 31, 1955. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:4.0 p.m. 



2039 



Degrees 



Charles F. 
Fraker - 
Emeritus 




cretary 



S. Church 
Hubbard - 
Emeritus 



2040 



COMMITTEE 



Stock 



V. A. Pice 
Scholarship 
Fund • 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
September 29, 1955, 2:4-0 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Haigis, Bartlett, Cashin, 

McDermott, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

On the recommendation of Chairman Haigis, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. Johnson, to subscribe to 
$800, 12-year 3 7/8% convertible debentures 
of the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, using 64- rights now held by the 
Trustees and to sell the remaining 2 rights, 
with the provision that the company hold the 
same and convert to common stock on December 
13, 1955. 

On the recommendation of Chairman Haigis, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, to convert the 
$900 of 3 3/U% debentures due December 10, 1965 
of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
now held by the Trustees into common stock of 
the American Telephone and Telegraph Company. 

On the recommendation of Chairman Haigis, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth ¥. Johnson, to accept the 
V. A. Pice Scholarship Fund of $2,600 and 
establish it as an Endowment Fund of the Uni- 
versity with the income therefrom to be made 
available, on an annual basis, for scholarships 
for worthy students majoring in the animal 
husbandry sequence in Dairy and Animal Science 
in either the four-year or Stockbridge School 
Program. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University has received 

the sum of $7372.03 from the legacy of Hannah K. Crooke to the 

Ascension Farm School. He explained that Miss Crooke had made a 

will leaving $15,000 to the Ascension Farm School but the will was 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

made after the school had been dissolved. The assets of the 
Ascension Farm School were turned over to the University of Massa- 
chusetts. The Ascension Farm School was revived legally so that 
it might receive Miss Crooke's legacy and turn the amount over to 
the University along with the previous assets. However, certain 
heirs of Miss Crooke took legal action to prevent the $15,000 
legacy going to the Ascension Farm School. Finally the matter was 
compromised out of court and by agreement of the lawyers represent- 
ing the University, by agreement of the University Treasurer, and 
by agreement of the Attorney General of Massachusetts, the Univer- 
sity settled for $9,037. From this amount legal fees of $1, 664.-97 
were deducted leaving a net amount of $7,372.03. 

On the recommendation of the Chairman, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the sum of $7,372.03 re- 
ceived from the legacy of Hannah K. Crooke 
to the Ascension Farm School be added to the 
Ascension Farm School Endowment Fund Principal 
and that the income therefrom be used for the 
same purpose, namely the education and train- 
ing in agriculture of boys resident in Western 
Mas sachusetts . 

On the recommendation of Chairman Haigis, it was 



2041 



unanimously 



VOTED: 



To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
Treasurer, Kenneth V. Johnson, to approve the 
disbursements from the Unrestricted Endowment 
Funds and the Sprague Fund for the period 
July 1, 1954- to June 30, 1955, as shown in 
the accompanying reports. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3:10 p.m. 




ecretary 



Ascension 
Farm School 



Unrestricted 

Endowment 

Funds 

Sprague Fund 



2042 



COMMITTEE 



Van Meter 
House 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

October 27, 1955, 2:00 p.m., Chairman Bartlett 1 s Office 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

It was 

VOTE D: To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Chairman Bartlett and Trustee Brett explained that it 
would be necessary to take certain legal steps in connection with 
the building of dormitory #14- inasmuch as this building is to be 
constructed as an extension of Van Meter House, dormitory #13. 
The legal technicalities are caused by the fact that certain land 
leased for the first portion of Van Meter House will need to be re- 
leased for use by the extension of Van Meter House. Under terms 
of the bond issue this extension is a separate self-liquidating 
unit and is a legal .entity apart from the first portion of 
Van Meter House. Trustees Bartlett and Brett also pointed out 
that the contractor will need to alter the north wall of the first 
portion of Van Meter House as the second portion is being con- 
structed against this wall. It is necessary to protect both the 
Commonwealth and the Massachusetts Building Association from lia- 
bilities which may arise in connection with changes in this wall. 
After discussion, it was unanimously 



DMMITTEE 



2043 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : That the foira of indenture for amendment of 
the Land Lease dated as of March 1, 19 54-, 
and recorded with Hampshire Deeds, Book 1165, 
Page 121, from the Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts to University of Massachusetts Building 
Association, be and hereby is approved as pre- 
sented to this meeting, said amendment to be 
consented to by Second Bank - State Street 
Trust Company (State Street Trust Company), 
of Boston, Massachusetts, as Trustee under 
Trust Indenture dated as of March 31, 19 54- J 
and that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, be and 
hereby are authorized, in the name and on be- 
half of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to 
execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
stantially in the form presented to this meet- 
ing, said indenture and to cause the common 
seal of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 

It was also unanimously 

VOTED : That the form of consent under the Building 

Lease dated as of March 1, 1954-, from Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Building Association to 
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts be and here- 
by is approved as presented to this meeting, 
the giving of said consent to be consented to 
by Second Bank - State Street Trust Company 
(State Street Trust Company) of Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, as Trustee under Trust Indenture 
dated as of March 31, 1954; and that the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
or a majority thereof, be and hereby are 
authorized, in the name and on behalf of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially 
in the form presented to this meeting, said 
consent and to cause the common seal of the 
University of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

The Trustees then discussed the terms of the land and 

building leases for dormitory #14- and after discussion, it was 

unanimously 



2044 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the form of lease from The Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts to University of 
Massachusetts Building Association of a 

j eel of land for the erection of one student 
dormitory building, all pursuant to Acts of 
1939, Chapter 3-38, as amended or supplemented 
by Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 19-46, 
Chapter 352, by Acts of 1943, Chapter 135, by- 
Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by Acts of 1952, 
Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, by 
Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, end by Acts of 
1955, Chapter 444, be and hereby is approved 
as oresented to this meeting; and that the 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
or a majority thereof, be and hereby are 
authorized, in the name and on behalf of The 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially 
in the form presented to this meeting, said 
lease of land from the Commonwealth to the 
Association and to cause the common seal of 
the University of Massachusetts to be affixed 
thereto. 

It was also unanimously 

VOTED ; That the form of lease of one student dormi- 
tory building by University of Massachusetts 
Building Association to The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts pursuant to Acts of 1939, 
Chapter 333, as amended or supplemented by 
Acts of 1945, Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, 
Chapter 352, by Acts of 1943, Chapter I85, 
by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, by Acts of 1952, 
Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, 
by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, and by Acts of 
1955, Chapter 444, said building to be erected 
by said Association on a parcel of land to be 
leased to it by the Commonwealth, be and hereby 
is approved as presented to this meeting; and 
that the Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts, or a majority thereof, be and hereby 
are authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially 
in the form presented to this meeting, said 
lease of one student dormitory building from 
said Association to the Commonwealth and to 
cause the common seal of the University of 
Massachusetts to be affixed thereto. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson said that in the capital outlay budget 
approved by the Board of Trustees for the year beginning July 1, 
1956, the P.OTC classroom building stood in seventh priority 
position in the list of approved construction. At that time the 
University expected the building would cost $600,000. After 
further review the administration now recommends to the Trustees 
that the appropriation requested from State funds for this build- 
ing be reduced to £4.00,000 and that the building be moved to #3 
position in priority order. 

Under terms of the long standing agreement between the 
University and the Department of Defense, the University is obli- 
gated to provide physical facilities for R0TC instruction. This 
is part of its land-grant obligation. The R0TC program is now 
housed in the same building used for physical education for women. 
This building is to be torn down to make way for the Liberal Arts 
Building for which funds have been provided by the Legislature. 
When the old building is torn down there will be no place for the 
R0TC required program. 

Furthermore, President Mather has discussed this matter 
with Federal officials and it appears likely that a Federal bill 
will be passed to provide Hatching funds for construction of R0TC 
facilities on land-grant campuses. 

Should this Federal bill pass and should the State pass 
an item of *400,000, the University would have a total of $300,000 
for construction of the R0TC building. After discussion, it was 
unanimously 



2045 



R0TC' 

Classroom 

Building 



2046 



COMMITTEE 



Valtham Field 
Station - 
land 



Sever 
System 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To authorize the President to place the 
ROTC building in #3 priority position in 
the capital outlay program for the year 
beginning July 1, 1956 and also to 
authorize the President to reduce the 
request for State appropriation for this 
building to $400,000. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University has received 

a letter from the Middlesex County Commissioners requesting the 

University to allow them to take certain land at the Waltham Field 

Station in connection with street widening under Chapter 90. The 

land which they desire is along the highway in front of the Field 

Station building. Included in the land taking would be fences, 

walls, trees, shrubbery and part of the gardens. After discussion, 

it was unanimously 

VOTED : To refer to the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds for- recommendation the re- 
quest from the Middlesex County Commissioners 
to take certain land at the Waltham Field 
Station. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University under 

authorization of the Trustees is now paying ".,,000 per year to the 

town of Amherst for sewer service. The $3*000 represents a 

negotiated rate. Last year the town voted that in the future sewer 

charges would be one-third of the water charges for each user in 

town. The University's water bill this year will be about $21,000 

which means that the sewer charge will be approximately $7,000* 

The new rate of payment went into effect January 1, 1955 and the 

University has been billed by the town at this new rate. During 

the course of discussion, it was pointed out that the University 

contributed one-third of the cost of construction of the town 

sewer plant- that the University contributed the land on which the 
plant is located. Mr. Johnson reported that there has been some 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

feeling in the tovn of Amherst that the University has not been pay- 
ing its share of the costs of local government brought about by the 
presence of the University. Townspeople have said that the Uni- 
versity and Amherst College cause expense to the town for additional 
police protection, fire protection and for school facilities. Some 
townspeople have also been critical of the fact that the Faculty 
Apartments at the University are tax exempt. After discussion, it 
was unanimously 

VOTED: To authorize the Treasurer to pay the sewer 
charges as billed by the town of Amherst. 

Secretary Burke said that on September 29> 1955 the 
Trustees had voted "To approve awarding of earned degrees at the 
end of the summer session and at the end of the first semester as 
well as at the annual commencement in June, with the understanding 
that students who complete their work at the end of the summer or 
at the end of the first semester be given the option of receiving 
the degree then as voted individually by the faculty and by the 
Board of Trustees or of receiving the degree at the following June 
commencement." Since that time 4-5 students have been certified by 
the Registrar as meeting all requirements for the baccalaureate de- 
gree. The faculty of the University met on October 13, 1955 and 
voted to recommend to the Bo rd of Trustees that the 4-5 candidates 
be promoted to graduation - warded the appropriate bachelors 



2047 



degree. 



It was the intention of the Trustees to take final action 



on th-^se candidates at the meeting called for October 15, 1955. 
This meeting was rained out and final action still is in abeyance. 



Degrees 



2048 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Chairman Bartlett asked whether the student re can- 
vassed as to whether they wished to receive the degree now or next 
June, Secretary Burke said that he had written to all students 
and has received replies from almost everyone. In only one instance 
does the student prefer to receive the degree next June and this 
privilege will be granted to him under terms of the Trustee vote. 

After discussion and on the recommendation of the 

P culty of the University and of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED: To award the attached degrees to the candi- 
dates as listed below with the understanding 
that the degrees will be awarded as of 
October 27, 1955 to those students desiring 
their diplomas at that time or as of commence- 
ment time in June of 1956 to any student who 
may prefer to receive his degree at that time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:4-5 p.m. 




U^% o^J^AUL, 



'ecretary 



Chairman 



IMMSTTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE FOF FURTHER STUDY OF THE 
QUESTION OF TUITION IRC! SE 

January 20, 1956, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, Amherst, Mass. 

Chairman Boyd en presiding 



PI^SENT : Trustees Boyd en, Brown, Buxton, 

Crowley, President Mather, Provost 
McCune, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



President Mather read those passages in the Governor's 
message to the Legislature which pertained to the question of 
possible tuition increase. He pointed out that the Governor had 
recommended the possibility of statutory action relative to tuition 
and said that it might be unfortunate to have tuition fixed by stat- 
ute. Up to the present time the Board has been free to fix tuition 
without legislation and it seems best for this power to remain with 
the Board of Trustees. A trend in the opposite direction would 
further take away from the already limited powers of the Board and 
would undermine the tradition of public trusteeship. 

The President spoke of Budget Commissioner Bixby's 
reference to the increa 1 read between appropriations and in- 
come at the University and presented figures to show that this in- 
creased spread is not attri.l le, to any extent, to an increased 
cost per student but rather reflects the total growth of the Uni- 
versity. At most in the past five years there has been a 21. "T 
increase in cost per student borne by the state. At the same time 
direct costs which the student pays for his education at the Uni- 
versity have increased 18%. The 18$ figure does not include 
charges for books, clothing, recreation, travel to and from home 
and other miscallaneous cost . (See attached statements) 



2049 



Tuition and 
Fees 



2050 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather pointed out that at the last meeting of 
the Boai 2 room rent was increased $15 per year and a $.20 per 
year fee was established for amortization and use of the Student 
Union Building. 

The President read a petition against increased tuition 
adopted by the Student Senate on January 17. Copy is appended to 
these minutes. 

He said that the administrative officers of the Univer- 
sity have been giving the problem of tuition considerable study in 
an effort to find a basic principle on which a sound recommenda- 
tion could be made. 

It is established practice for state universities to 
charge some fee to the student. The question is how much this fee 
should be. It might be possible to rationalize a small tuition 
increase to place the University about in the median of what other 
universities are charging but this effort would be based on curren 
practice rather than on any educational principle. 

Trustee Crowley and Trustee Brown defended the idea of 
no increase in tuition charges at the state university. They ex- 
pressed the belief that the trend of education is in the direction 
of extension of the public school system beyond the high school 
level. Trustee Boyd en said that labor, groups throughout the state 
are strongly behind the idea of extension of free education. 
Mr. Crowley said that the teachers colleges undoubtedly will 
attempt to avoid any increase in tuition because of the acute need 
for preparation of teachers for the Massachusetts school system. 

Mr. Brown pointed out that the direct cost to the student is going 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

up an additional $35 because of recent Trustee action and said that 

he personally doubts that the tuition charge should be based on 

the unit cost to the state. Why put the burden on the individual 

student when free education is gaining more and more recognition 

on the grounds that it benefits not the student alone but society 

as a whole? 

President Mather said that a strong case can be made for 

the principle of increasing free education as the underpinning for 

a productive economy. Where education flourishes production and 

income increase. This has been so true in the United States that 

the Fussians are taking over the idea and providing free education 

for young men and women who can profit by the experience. Russia 

is n t doing this for the sake of the individual but for the 

greater benefit to the state. After further discussion, it was 

unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that there 
be no increase in tuition for in- ;. te 
students at the University of Massachusetts. 

The committee discussed tuition for out-of-state students 

and President Mather pointed out that only three out-of-state 

students have been accepted in the freshman and sophomore class. 

He said that there is some danger that if the University refuses 

to accept any out-of-state students, the other states may retaliate 

against students from Massachusetts. In fact such measures have 

begun. The University of New Hampshire has reduced the percentage 

of out-of-state students; the University of Michigan is cutting 

back, Indiana cut back last year and others may follow this 

pattern. On the other hand, there is no reason why the University 



205 L 



2052 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

should give out-of-state students an education below cost. He 
ruggested that if out-of-state undergraduate tuition were fixed 
at approximately ; p600 per year, the University might be justified 
in taking some out-of-state students and that it would be a good 
thin^r for our students to meet and work with students from other 



states. 



As to graduate students, the President suggested a need 



for some subsidy. Graduate students can be an asset to a univer- 
sity and most universities make graduate study attractive by offer- 
ing fellowships and scholarships. This procedure can be justified 
because of the pressing need for preparing more college teachers. 
It was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend to the Trustees that the under- 
graduate tuition for non-residents of the 
Commonwealth be increased from $4-00 to ^600 
per year effective September 1, 1956. 

It was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Trustees that the graduate 
tuition for non-residents of the Commonwealth 
be increased from $10 per credit hour to $15 
per credit hour; 

that the Summer School tuition rate for non- 
residents of the Commonwealth be fixed at 
l'15 per credit hour; 

and that fees or tuition for non-residents of 
the Commonwealth for other courses than those 
mentioned above be in proportion to the length 
of the session or the number of credit hours 
obtained in the session. 

The committee then reviewed other fee charges for stu- 
dents such as key deposits, Chemistry breakage fee, athletic 
losses and library fines. At the present time each of these fees 
or fines is assessed to each individual student as loss or 



3MMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

breakage occurs. Often the difficulty and cost of collection is 
out of proportion to the amount of the fee or fine collected. The 
President recommended establishment of a more uniform and business- 
like procedure for such fees. After discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees 

adopt the following policy for reimburse- 
ment for loss or damage of University property. 

Students are expected to reimburse the Commonwealth 
for damage to or loss of University property in 
accordance with the following regulations: 



1. 



3 



Damage or loss to all University property to 
be billed at replacement cost. Minimum charge 
for such damage or loss to be $5*00. Items of 
less than £5.00 value not charged except as 
established below. 

Key De-posit - effective June 4-> 1956 
Discontinue present key deposit. 
Establish charge for key replacement of $2.00 

Chemistry Breakage - effective immediately. 
Discontinue present charges for chemistry 
breakage except where loss or damage is 



11 



L. 



'5.00 or more for each loss. 



Athletic Losses - effective immediately. ■ 

Discontinue present athletic loss charges 
except where loss or damage is 15.00 or 
more for each loss. 



5. Library Fines - effective immediately. 



Minimum ciiarge for lost book 






5.00 



Replacement of lost library card .25 
Schedule of library fines - 

Pe serve Books - returned late on 

date due .25 per hour 

Reserve Books - after due date 1.00 per day 
Reserve Books taken from library 

but not charged 1.00 per day 

Regular circulation .02 per day 



Librarian authorized to waive fines when in 
his judgment undue hardship is caused. 

Privilege of borrowing library books for use 
outside the library may be denied by the 
Librarian for unpaid fines or charges. 



2053 



2054 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Trustees discussed at length the problen of en- 
couraging young men and women with very low means but real inherent 
ability to obtain a college education. At the present time the 
state provides 100 scholarships each year - 25 for each class. 
These scholarships are in the amount of &2 50 and hence cover more 
than tuition. A number of bills are before the Legislature this 
year to increase scholarship aid at the University and at other 
state institutions. The Trustees favored the idea of allowing the 
President to grant tuition waivers for worthy and needy students 
rather than statutory regulation of additional scholarships and it 
was unanimously 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the President to waive tuition for each 
worthy and needy student who can establish 
that the payment of tuition would be an un- 
due hardship in obtaining an education. 

The committee asked the Administration to develop a 

policy statement setting forth the principle on which a low tuition 

rate is based. 

The meeting was adjourned at -4:15 p.m. 




^Secretary 



3MMITTEE 



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523 





UNIVEBSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Aaherst, iMass. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 
Senate 



January 18, 1956 



Tos Board of Trustees 

Ife&versity of Massachusetts 
Aahergt, K&gsachusetts 

Jromt Student Government Association 
University of Massachusetts 
Aaherst, Massachusetts 



The Student Government Association is the representative 
body of the students at the University of Massachusetts. The Student 
Senate is the legislative organ of this group. All members of the 
Senate are elected. on a representative basis from the entire under- 
graduate body. 

After careful consideration by both the executive cowoittse 
and the entire Senate, the attached resolution was unanimously passed 
and is now being submitted for your consideration. 

Ve earnestly believe in the principles of the resolution, 
and hope that they will receive adequate consideration during your 
discussion of the proposed increase in tuition fees. 

/s/ George F. Cole, President 

Student Government Association 
University of Massachusetts 



Re solution passed by the Student Senate at the meeting of 
January 17, 1956 

The Student Senate of the University of Massachusetts wishes to 
request a protest to any move to raise the tuition at the university, 
e.s a negation of the principle of public education and as an undue 

ancial hardship on many students entailing no guarantee of in- 
creased educational bsnefit. 

Education is recognized in the 20th century not as a privilege 
but as a right end a necessity of a free person vested with the 
responsibilities in democmtic living. Started first as grammar school 
training, then extended to the secondary level, public education is now 
conceived as including four years of college as well. 

The young people who receive college training today will be the 
leaders in technology, government, education, medicine, religion and 
business, upon whom the country will depend for future peace and progress. 

In our own case 5 the state of Massachusetts especially needs a 
continuing stream of trained people to assume continuing leadership 
if she is to remain a prosperous community in the face of current in- 
dustrial transition. 

A raiss in the tuition of the University of Massachusetts would 
be an act of blindness to the principle of public education and to 
the needs of the state of Massachusetts. 

Ine current move to raise the tuition rate of the university is 
rationalized by its proponents as an expedient measure necessary in 
the light of university expansion. It is encouraged by other 
supporters who hope for better scholarship benefits * Both lines of 
reasoning ere shown to be fallacious by the consideration of the 
financial set-up between the university and the state legislature. 
Unlike any other state university, tuition revenue froa Massachusetts 
students goes to the state General Fund, and university expenditures 
as well, as all other state transactions, are appropriated froa the 
Fund. There is no guarantee that increased tuition revenue would b© 
voted back for university use. 

Bather, as the tuition raise is proposed as part of a general 
state economy measure it i3 much more probeble that the increase would 
be used to help defray the current deficit in the General Fond. 

As even a $50 Increase in tuition would garner for the state only 
£220,000 in the face of a deficit amounting to several million dollars, 
the increase could not appreciably aid either the state or even the 
university if the funds were guaranteed to be returned. 



Therefor© an Increase in tuition, which vould impose serious hard- 
ship on a large percentage of university students, would amount to 
little more th?n a gesture of good-will to the state fiscal authorities, 

Vfoen measured by the principle of public education and the practice 
of General Fund financing the tuition raise la regarded by the Student 
Senate as uncalled for, and harmful to the well-being of the University 
of Massachusetts and its students. 



/s/ George F» Cole 

President of Student Senate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

February 6, 1956, 1:00 p.m., Chairman Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Whitmore, Taber, Bartlett, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

President Mather reminded the committee that the 
Trustees had authorized the preparation of a master plan of the 
campus so that public funds expended on expansion of the Univer- 
sity over the next ten or twenty years would be spent wisely 
through proper planning of utilities, buildings, circulation, and 
other physical features. The firm selected for this landscape 
architectural study was Shurcliff and Shur cliff of Boston. Be- 
fore undertaking the study, however, Mr. Sidney Shurcliff 
suggested that his firm should survey the problem and do some 
preliminary work in order to determine the proper approach and 
the size of the task involved. After negotiation the Division of 
Building Construction let a contract to Shurcliff and Shurcliff 
for preparation of a preliminary plan and report. This plan has 
been completed for some time and copies have been sent to all 
members of the Board of Trustees for study. Mr. Shurcliff has 
been paid for most of the work, but a small amount has been held 
back by the Division awaiting approval of the Board of Trustees 
of the preliminary work. 

The President suggested that the Buildings and Grounds 
Committee should review the work done to date by Mr. Shurcliff 
and if they find the work satisfactory should recommend that the 
Trustees approve his final payment and also recommend that the 



2057 



Master 
Plan 



2058 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustees authorize Shurcliff and Shurcliff to proceed with the 
second phase which will provide the complete master plan for the 



campus 



Treasurer Johnson pointed out that necessarily in this 



first phase Shurcliff and Shurcliff had to devote much of their 
time to preparing complete contour plans of the University grounds, 
placing bench marks on all existing buildings, locating utilities, 
assisting in the location of new buildings that were being con- 
structed during the course of the planning; and for these reasons 
had little time to prepare a future plan. However, he feels that 
the background work they have now accomplished places them in a 
good position to proceed with a well -developed design of the 



campus 



The committee called Mr. Sidney Shurcliff into the meet- 



ing and reviewed with him his preliminary plans and discussed also 
several modifications suggested by the Landscape Architecture De- 
partment of the University. Mr. Shurcliff said that the depart- 
ment has made some good suggestions and that he will be glad to 
incorporate them in his future work. 

Chairman Whitmore thanked Mr. Shurcliff for his excellent 
presentation and stated that the committee was glad to have such 
a complete survey toward the development of the master plan. He 
said that he would assume that the final plan will incorporate the 
best features of both Mr. Shurcliff 's plan and of the suggestions 
offered by the Landscape Architecture Department. 

Mr. Shurcliff emphasized thzt his preliminary sketches 
were not necessarily a fixed part of the final plan to be 



2059 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

developed; that because of the necessity of preparing ground survey^, 
utility studies, traffic studies and assisting in locating current 
buildings little time was left for preparing a future plan. How- 
ever, he now has the complete information needed to proceed with 
the development of the plan. He emphasized also that even a com- 
plete master plan needs modification from time to time. A master 
plan is only a print of current thinking. It is a guide to the 
future and should not be looked at as forever rigid. 

In answer to question from the committee he said that 
about one year is needed for completion of the master plan --10 
months for planning, 6 weeks for printing of an accompanying 
pamphlet, and 6 weeks for preparation of a scale model. He 
suggested the desirability of having a model to help people 
visualize the proposed plan better; also a printed pamphlet which 
will place the plan on record with many people and keep it from 
being just a vague plan tucked away in a file. He estimated the 
cost of the master plan at about $21,000 including the model. 
Cost of the preliminary plan was approximately $23,300 of which 
$12,000 went to the survey service. 

Mr. Shurcliff suggested that the Trustees might wish to 
consider the employment of a landscape architectural consultant 
who would perform a similar service for the Trustees to that per- 
formed by the architectural consultant. He could be called in 
from time to time as the Trustees felt the need for advice before 
proceeding with detailed plans. 

President Mather emphasized that about $40,000,000 will 
be spent for new buildings in the next 10 years. The cost of 
sound planning is but a small portion of the cost of building and 



2060 



COMMITTEE 



Roads 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



should be looked at as an investment that will pay off time and 



again. 



The committee discussed with Mr, Shurcliff the layout of 



campus roads and asked whether it would be safe to proceed with 
recommendations to the Department of Public Works for the improve- 
ment and repaving of certain campus roads. After discussion, it 



was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the following road construction priorities. 

1. Approach to campus from new Rt. 116 by-pass to be 
built by Department of Public Works as part of 
Rt. 116 project connecting to old route 116 - 
North Pleasant Street and other campus roads as 
shown on plan in yellow. 

2. 1956 project with present $22,500 available - re- 
build road from foot of Clark Hill Road at inter- 
section with Butterfield Terrace running northerly 
in front of Mills and Brooks Dormitories past 
Durfee Conservatory to intersection with Stockbridge 
Road with connections to other roads as shown on 
plan in red. 

3. Rebuild Stockbridge Road full length as shown on 
plan in blue. 

4. Construct new road from north edge of ravine near 
Power Plant to Engineering Buildings as shown on 
plan in green. 

5. Rebuild road on north side of ravine from Ellis 
Drive to proposed outer-circulatory road as shown 
on plan in orange. 

6. Build road connecting Chemistry Addition to North 
Pleasant Street with connections to Engineering 
Buildings as shown on the plan in purple. 

7. Construct outer-circulatory road as shown from 
North Pleasant Street to new approach road as 
shown on the plan in brown. 

8. Construct connecting links from Classroom Building 
(Machmer Hall) to Library Addition as shown on the 
plan in black. 



2061 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

9. Construct new road from Lincoln Avenue to North 
Pleasant Street and rebuilt section of Lincoln 
Avenue as shown on the plan in pink. 

10. Construct connecting roads in men's dormitory 
area as shown on the plan in light green. 

11. Rebuild and surface Eastman Lane (if title has 
been acquired) as shown on the plan in light blue. 

It is expected that these roads will be constructed by 
the Department of Public Works and that the approved list may be 
changed from time to time if the necessity for change arises. 
Only the first one or two projects will be constructed in the 
immediate future. 

The committee discussed the need for further development 
of parking lots, of possible locations for faculty housing, of 
locations for fraternities and sororities. 

After further discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept 
Mr. Shurcliff's preliminary plans as 
having been completed satisfactorily 
and authorize the final payment for 
these plans. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees employ 

Shurcliff and Shurcliff for preparation 
of a complete master plan of the campus 
it being understood that payment for this 
work will be provided from funds of the 
Division of Building Construction. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Secretary 



2062 



COMMITTEE 



Degrees 



School of 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

February 14, 1956, 12:15 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : 



Trustees Boyden, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, Desmond, Mrs. McNamara, 
President Mather, Secretary Burke 



It was 



VOTED ; To dispense with reading of the call and 

reading of the minutes of the last meeting. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the University 

and of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees award the 
degrees to the candidates as set forth 
on the attached list with the understand- 
ing that the degrees will be awarded as 
of February 14, 1956 to those students 
desiring their diplomas as this time or 
as of commencement in June of 1956 to 
those students who may prefer to receive 
their diplomas at that time. 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate 

School of the University and of the President, it was unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees award de- 
grees to the candidates as set forth on 
the attached list with the understanding 
that the degrees will be awarded as of 
February 14, 1956. 

Chairman Boyden said that members of the Board recently 
received a recommendation from the President and from the Educa- 
tional Policies Council of the University that the present Depart- 
ment of Education be designated as a School of Education effective 
September 1, 1956. 

President Mather described present offerings of the De- 
partment of Education which prepares both elementary and high 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

school teachers. He said that the philosophy of the department is 
that most of the work (at least 75%) be taken outside the Depart- 
ment of Education and that a maximum of 25% of the credits for the 
degree are taken in courses in Education itself. The President is 
convinced that the present balance in the instructional program 
for those preparing for teacher training is sound and has the back- 
ing of the whole University. He feels that the time has come to 
establish the department as a school so that teacher training may 
be given due emphasis in the years ahead when many more teachers 
will be needed. After discussion, the committee unanimously 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

the establishment of a School of Education 

in the University effective September 1, 1956. 

President Mather said that one of the problems of the 

University at the present time is to obtain good teaching fellows. 

Teaching fellows are graduate students who devote half time to 

assisting with instruction in the University. The national average 

for this half-time service is about $1800 per year. For some years 

the University has been paying but $1000 and as a result has not 

been able to attract outstanding candidates. After discussion, it 



2063 



was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
payment of $1200 per year for half-time 
teaching fellows in their first year of 
service and $1400 per year for half-time 
teaching fellows in their second or 
succeeding years of service, the new 
stipends to be effective February 1, 1956. 



Teaching 
Fellows 



Stipends 



2064 



COMMITTEE 

Richard M. 

Colwell 

promotion 



Fayette H. 

Branch 

Emeritus 



Wellesley C. 

Harrington 

Emeritus 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees promote 
Richard M. Colwell from Associate Pro- 
fessor to Professor in the School of 
Business Administration effective 
February 1, 1956 at annual salary of 
$6780. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name 

Fayette H. Branch, Professor of Agri- 
cultural Economics and Farm Management, 
Emeritus, effective on his retirement 
January 3, 1956. 

Upon the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name 

Wellesley C. Harrington, Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering, Emeritus, 
effective on his retirement 
January 6, 1956. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1 o'clock. 




JxZ^tj£ . 



Secretary 



1 hereby agree £o waive ? <S*y«' ootiee lot aeatiflg 



of the C&ms&ltm ®n 



end Program of Stn# of ifce Board 



of Troetee* of the Unlvereity of Heeeeelaieette called for 



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in Boa teru 



Betel Staeier 





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I hereby agree to valve 7 day©' notice for seating 
of the Comal t tee on Faculty and Program of Study of the Boar4 
of Trustees of the University of Maaaaehuaetts called for 
Tuesday, February 14, 1956, at 12 noon at the Hotel Stagier 
in Boston. 



Signature 



MtytMMWi|Wrtuit|>lP'ii»lW.iftWW^^ 





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Sate 



I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice for meeting 
of the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study of the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called for 
Tuesday, February 14, 1956, at 12 noon at the Hotel Statler 
in Boston. 








I hereby agree to waive 7 days' notice for meeting 
of the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study of the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called for 
Tuesday, February 14, 1956, at 12 noon at the Hotel Statler 
in Boston. 





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of th« GooBd&tUMi §i faulty an* 
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I hereby agree to waive 7 days 1 notice for meeting 
of the Committee on Faculty and Program of Study of the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts called for 
Tuesday, February 14, 1856, at 12 noon at the Hotel Statler 
in Boston. 






Signature 



Date 



2065 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

May 8, 1956, 10:00 a.m., Chairman Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 

McDermott, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

The committee inspected plans for the Animal Building 

to be constructed with gift of $50,000 from Mrs. Harriet G. Bird, 

The plans were prepared by Louis W. Ross, architect of Boston. 

After discussion it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

plans for the building for the investiga- 
tion of health problems of large animals 
as prepared by Louis W. Ross, architect. 

It was also 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the construction of this building on a 
site adjoining the present poultry isola- 
tion building behind Paige Laboratory. 

The committee discussed the shortage of housing for 
faculty and married students in and about the University. Treasure}: 
Johnson said that the faculty apartment building constructed by 
the University of Massachusetts Building Association houses 50 
faculty families. All units have remained filled and there is ex- 
cess demand. The University also has 60 units for married students 
and a long waiting list. The Treasurer said that there is no 
doubt that the University could fill another 100 apartments if 
these could be constructed to rent for $60 for a two-bedroom 
apartment and $50 for a one-bedroom apartment. He suggested that 
the unit might be constructed primarily for students but the 



Animal 
Health 
Building 



Housing for 
Faculty and 
Married 
Students 



2066 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University might allow some members of the faculty to live there 
on a temporary basis. President Mather pointed out that 100 
units would take care of only present demand -- that in the long 
range many more units will be needed. In so far as faculty 
housing is concerned, he would prefer to see private capital con- 
struct such units on a tax-paying basis. However, he sees little 
hope that this will be done. The only new construction in Amherst 
at the present time is of single unit houses selling at a price 
far beyond the amount which could be paid by an instructor or 
assistant professor. The President said that if the University 
is to expand, it is essential that housing be provided. 

He suggested that if the units constructed primarily for 
married students are made available also to faculty members, only 
instructors and assistant professors should be allowed to live in 
these units and then only for a period of three years. After 
this time, unless they move on to another college, they would be 
expected to go out into the community and find housing of their 
own. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees request 

the University of Massachusetts Building 
Association to study the possibility of 
constructing 100 low cost apartment units 
for the University on a self -liquidating 

basis. 

i 

It was agreed that before the Board meeting on May 15, 
Trustee Brett would talk with some insurance companies to see 
whether private capital might be interested in constructing low 
cost apartments at the University. 



2067 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather described the physical condition of the 
fifteen fraternity and sorority houses associated with the Uni- 
versity. Only three of these houses are adequate for their pur- 
pose. Most of the societies are housed in frame buildings located 
near private residences of Amherst under overcrowded and very un- 
satisfactory conditions. They have attempted to operate on the 
philosophy of competing in price with dormitory and boarding hall 
facilities of the University. 

The town feels that the fraternities and sororities are 
a nuisance and have zoned the town so that no additional fraterni- 
ties or sororities may rent houses or build houses in the town. 
The only way in which the condition of the houses can be improved 
is to encourage them to move on to a portion of the campus in 
suitably constructed chapter houses. At the time that his move is 
made the University should also try to cooperate with the houses 
in improving their financial and social conditions. The President 
feels, however, that it would be a mistake to allow them to build 
on state-owned land and hence be under the direct control of the 
University. This problem could be solved by taking advantage of 
the provisions of section 25 of chapter 75 of the General Laws 
which permits the Trustees to sell land to fraternities. 

Treasurer Johnson said that four of the organizations 
have made written request to purchase University land and two of 
the four appear ready to proceed with construction this summer if 
they can acquire University land. The main drawback in the past 
has been that the Trustees have required the insertion of a 
"recapture" clause in the deed and this clause has prevented banks 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 



COMMITTEE 



Poultry 
Houses 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



and insurance companies from loaning funds for the construction of 

houses. President Mather suggested that the Trustees might be 

willing to drop the "recapture" clause if their interest can be 

protected in some other manner. For example, the town might agree 

to zone land sold by the University to fraternities and sororities 

to restrict such land to fraternity or sorority use in the future. 

Trustee Brett suggested that the University might also set certain 

restrictions and conditions on the sale of land so as to provide 

for maintenance of better standards by the fraternities and 

sororities. He also raised question as to whether the University 

of Massachusetts Building Association might construct the 

fraternities as part of the housing program for students. After 

discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees set aside 
a portion or portions of the campus for 
sale to fraternities and sororities for 
the construction of chapter houses with 
appropriate restrictions as to the type 
of construction and as to suitable con- 
trol by the University of the maintenance 
and activities of the fraternities and 
sororities. 

The committee also 

VOTED : That the Board of Trustees consider a 
"recapture" clause no longer necessary 
in deeding land to fraternities and 
sororities. 

The committee considered the location of two wooden 
poultry houses to be used by the Veterinary Department of the Uni- 
versity and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees 
authorize these buildings to be located 
temporarily on land to the south of the 
Brooks Farm barn - it being understood 
that the buildings must be removed later 
in favor of other University construction 
scheduled for this area. 



May 3, 1956 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



PROPOSED CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 



1958 

1. Science Center (third section - Botany) $1,500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 
(Completion: September 1959) 

2. School of Education and Laboratory 1,300,000 

Practice School 

including furnishings & equipment 
(Completion: September 1959) 

3. Infirmary 1,100,000 

including furnishings & equipment 
(Completion: September 1959) 

4. Engineering Shops and Drafting Rooms 500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

5. General Maintenance Building 350,000 

including furnishings & equipment 
(Completion: January 1959) 

6. Cold Storage Laboratory and Addition to 1,000,000 

Food Technology Building (to replace Fisher Lab.) 
including equipment 

(Completion: January 1959) 

7. Purchase of Certain Land 150,000 

(to replace farm land used for 
buildings, etc.) 

8. Laboratory Equipment, to be in addition 100,000 

to 1955 and 1956 appropriations 

9. Addition to Utilities, including steam, 310,000 

electric, water and sewer distribution 
systems in addition to prior 
appropriations 



TOTAL $6,310,000 



.;*•/; 



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' ." V.iftV f • 1/ '"'■ 



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It, 



•>.;•-' 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 
1959 

1. Dining Commons - Men's Area $1,500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

2. Physical Education Building for Men 2,000,000 

including furnishings, equipment, and 
site improvements 

3. Natural Resources Building 600,000 

including furnishings 6c equipment 

4. Science Center (fourth section) 1,500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

5. Laboratory Equipment, to be in addition 100,000 

to prior appropriations 

6. Addition to Experiment Station Building 200,000 

at East Wareham 

including furnishings & equipment 

7. Poultry Plant Laboratories & Buildings 100,000 



TOTAL $6,000,000 



1960 

1. Animal Industries Building $ 800,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

2. Additions to the Power Plant Facilities 600,000 

and utility distribution systems 

3. Additions to Physics Building 2,000,000 

including furnishings 6c equipment 

4. Classrooms and Offices, School of 1,000,000 

Business Administration 

including furnishings 6c equipment 

5. Plant Science Building and Greenhouses 1,500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

6. Laboratory Equipment, to be in addition 100,000 

to prior appropriations 



TOTAL $6,000,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 3 



1961 



1. Assembly Hall & Field House $3,000,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

2. Engineering Building 1,500,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

3. Administration Building 1,000,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

4. Warehouse and Garage for Plant 200,000 

5. Physical Education Fields 200,000 

including drainage, grading & seeding 

6. Service Building for Experiment Station 100,000 



TOTAL $6,000,000 



1962 

1. Farm Buildings Replacements $3,000,000 

2. Classroom Building 1,000,000 

including furnishings & equipment 

3. Auditorium - Music, TV and Drama 3,000,000 

and Art Center 



TOTAL $7,000,000 



TOTAL -- FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM $31,310,000 



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II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported that Mr. Brehm, Superintendent 

of Buildings and Grounds, has inspected and approved the $22,000 

renovation of French Hall. After discussion of the project, it 

was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept as 
completed April 11, 1956 the French Rail 
renovation U-402 contract #2 by the Fontaine 
Brothers of Chicopee. 

The committee then considered the revised five-year 

capital outlay budget of the University and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the administration to submit the attached 
five-year capital outlay program. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the University has been 
having trouble for some years in recruiting power plant engineers, 
especially second class power plant engineers. Even though the 
Governor and Council have permitted recruitment at the maximum 
rate for this grade, the rate is below the going rate in the area. 
Because of the high cost of housing in Amherst, it has been im- 
possible to hold an engineering staff. There has been one death 
and one resignation recently. He proposed that the University be 
allowed to rent apartments in the faculty apartment building at 
half price to power plant engineers. During discussion it was 
pointed out that the remaining engineers are operating two shifts 
a day and that unless this continues or new engineers employed 
the plant will be illegally staffed. After further discussion, 
it was 



2069 



French Hall 
Renovation 



Five-Year 
Capital Outla 
"Budget 



Power Plant 
Engineers 



2070 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the administration to cut the rents to 
half price on two apartments to be used 
for power plant engineers in the Univer- 
sity faculty apartment building. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:40 p.m. 




ecretary 



2071 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

May 8, 1956, 1:50 p.m., Chairman Bartlett* s Office, Boston 

In the absence of Trustee Haigis, 
Chairman Bartlett presided 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
McDermott, Taber, Whitmore, 
President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 



Because of the lateness of the hour, it was 

VOTED : To adjourn this meeting to Tuesday, May 15, 
at 10:30 a.m., Butterfield House, University 
of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. 




Secretary 



2072 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Courses 



Robert P. 
Holdsworth 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 15, 1956, 10:30 a.m., Butterfield House, U of M, Amherst 



Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Miss Buxton, 

Crowley, Desmond, President Mather, 
Secretary Burke 

The committee reviewed proposed new courses of study. 
President Mather said that these courses originated in the depart- 
ments concerned, were approved by the Course of Study Committee in 
the School or College affected and then passed upon by the Univer- 
sity Course of Study Committee. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the attached new undergraduate courses 
of study. 

The committee next considered graduate courses 

recommended by the Graduate School Council of the University, and 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the attached new graduate courses. 

President Mather said that Professor Robert P. Holdsworth. 
Head of the Department of Forestry, has requested that he be re- 
lieved of the headship of the department and be allowed to remain 
as Professor of Forestry. Professor Holdsworth is nearing the re- 
tirement age and this request is similar to one approved by the 
Trustees for another head of department last year. After con- 
sideration, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

Professor Robert P. Holdsworth 1 s request 
to be relieved of his duties as Head of 
the Department of Forestry and to affirm 
his status as full Professor of Forestry 
effective September 1, 1956. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees promote Pro- 
fessor Arnold D. Rhodes from Professor of 
Forestry to Head of Department of Forestry 
effective September 1, 1956. 

President Mather reported that Dr. Leonard R. Wilson, 

Head of the Department of Geology, has resigned to accept a position 

with New York University. The administration has spent considerable 

time attempting to find a suitable successor and fortunately has 

located an outstanding candidate, Dr. H. T. U. Smith, who is now 

Associate Professor of Geology at the University of Kansas. 

Dr. Smith received his Bachelor of Science degree from the College 

of Wooster in 1930, the Master of Science degree from Harvard in 

1933 and the Doctor of Philosophy degree from Harvard in 1936. 

His text on "Aerial Photographs and their Application" is widely 

used. On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees appoint 
Dr. H. T. U. Smith as Head of the De- 
partment of Geology effective September 1, 
1956. 

President Mather submitted report on appointments, pro- 
motions, resignations and other faculty changes during the period 
January 1, 1955 through April 30, 1956 and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
report as presented. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

attached sabbatical leaves subject to appro- 
priation of funds and to the usual conditions 
governing sabbatical leaves. Those indi- 
viduals going for one-half year or for one 
semester are to be granted leave with full 
pay and those going for one year are to be 
granted leave at half pay. 



2073 



Arnold D, 
Rhodes 



Personnel 
Changes 



2074 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 11:45 a.m. 




Secretary 



1 



im COURSES 



The following new courses have been approved by the University 
Course of Study Comas! t tee and are recotsaseaded for approval of the Board 
of Trustees. 

AGRONOMY 52 (11) FORAGE CROPS. 

An analysis of the basic principles involved in the establishment, 

fertilisation and management of forage grasses and legumes. 

3 Class hours. Credit 3 

BACTERIOLOGY 93 (II) BACTERIAL PHYSIOLOGY. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises demonstrating the growth and 
activities of microorganisms as influenced by the environment 
and genotype and the effect of the microorganisms on the environment. 
Topics considered include the kinetics of population growth, 
eiusyamtic constitution, growth requirements, metabollic pathways 
and effects of radiation. 

Prerequisites: Bacteriology 31, Chemistry 79, or equivalent, 

and permission of the instructor. 

1 4-hour laboratory period, 2 lecture hours Credit 3 

CHEMICAL EKGOTE&XMJ 25 (I) - CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY. 

Aa introduction to the nature and scope of the chemical industry 
through the study of selected chemical processes such as cojaason 
salt, sodium carbonate, sodium hydroxide, sulphuric acid, ammonia, 
nitric acid, methanol. The importance of economic factors and of 
technical factors like equilibria and reaction rates is shown. 

2 Class hours Credit 2 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 or 4 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 82 (II) SOIL TESTING. 

Sampling, testing and presentation of reports on the engineering 
properties of soils. Permeability, consolidation, and shear 
are the tests covered. Triaacial compression is the principal 
technique used. 

1 Class hour; 2-3 hour lab. periods. Credit 3 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 37 BASIC ENGINEERING MATERIALS. 

Properties of engineering materials; failure by inelastic action, 
creep, fatigue, and corrosion. The crystalline nature of metals, 
properties and uses of structural metals, wood, stone, clay 
products, cementing materials, plastics and rubber. Laboratory 
work includes tensile, hardness, Impact and fatigue testing, 
metal lagraphic preparation. 

2 Class hours; 1 3-hour laboratory period Credit 3 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 or 4; fhysies 27 taken pre- 
viously or concurrently. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 74 (I) (II) BASIC AERODYNAMICS. 

A course designed to introduce the student with no previous back- 
ground in the subject, to the basic concepts of applied aerodynamics. 
Topics include properties of air, ideal fluid flow, lift and move- 
ment of a two-dimensional airfoil, three dimensional flow around 
an airfoil, induced and viscous effects, airfoils and their 
properties, propellers, aircraft performance and stability. 

3 Class hours Credit 3 



MECHANICAL -ENGINEERING 85 (I) DYNAMICS OF MACHINERY, 

Elements of vibration theory, vibration isolation, vibration 
analysis of equivalent ssssses and shaft system®. Vibration 
absorbent, many-degree-of -freedom systems using iteration. 
Dynamic balancing. Vibration instrumentation. 
3 Class hours Credit 4 

1 3-hour laboratory 

Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 52; Mechanical 

Engineering $8, 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 87 (I) ENGINEERING THEKMQDYNAMICS III, 

A» advanced course wh&re such topics as steam turbines, steam 
power plants, refrigeration, high velocity flow, and shock 



I 



3 Class hours Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 64. 

GREEK 1,2, ELEMENTARY GREEK. 

Intensive study of the essentials of the language. Reading of 
simple selections froes classical Greek prose and poetry. The 
course is designed to build a foundation in Greek grammar and 
vocabulary and develop facility for subsequent reading of master- 
works of classical literature. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

GREEK 5, 6, INTERMEDIATE GREEK. 

Review of elements of language. Selected readings in the Homeric 
epics and the dialogues of Plato. Study of the Iliad will be the 
focal point of the course. 

3 Class hours. Credit 3 

Prerequisite: Greek 1 and 2, or two years ©f High 

School Greek. 

GOVERNMSIIT 52 AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. 

An analysis of the principles of American foreign policy. Con- 
stitutional, political and administrative considerations which 
influence the formulation and execution of American foreign 
policy will be discussed. Special emphasis will be placed on 
current issues. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

GOVETOfSOT 56 THE LEGISLATIVE. PROCESS. 

A study ©f the role of the legislature in national and state 
government, Asaong other topics, the functions of legislatures, 
legislative procedures and the role played by political parties 
and pressure groups in the legislative process will be surveyed. 
Emphasis will be placed on research. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

HISTORY 63 (I) 64 (II) HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT AND CULTURE. 

A study of the basic strands of American thought and their re- 
flection in the development of social life and institutions, 
literature, and the arts. The first course covers the period 
to 1865. Either semester may be elected independently. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 






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- 



I 



I 



I 



HISTORY 66 (IX) THE HI3TOEY OF MO0EEN GSSKAKY. 

The evolution of Germany since 1750 In relationship to Western 
Europe. An analysis of those economic, social, and political, 
and intellectual influences which determined the unique direction 
of German cultural development. Culminates in a study of the 
$asi revolution and contemporary Germany. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

HISTORY 79, MU ENSLAKD TO 1860. 

A study of the colonial and early national periods, with emphasis 

upon the political, social and economic aspects of life in this 

region. 

3 Class hours. Credit 3 

H0S2E ECONOMICS 3 &UTRITI0H. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and their application to 
individual and fsasily food habits. International problems in 
foods and nutrition will also be considered. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

SUSSIAH 5 (I) 6 (II) 

A review of the fundamentals of grammar followed by more advanced 
study of grammatical structure and idiom. Continued composition 
and conversation, and readings in Russian fiction. 
3 Class hours; 1 laboratory hour Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Russian 1 and 2. 

SOCIOLOGY 54 ADVANCED ANTHROPOLOGY. 

An examination of the development of anthropological theory of 
social organisation as presented in the works of European and 
American anthropologists. A part of the semester is devoted to 
an intensive analysis of a specific culture area. 

Credit 3 
Prerequisite: Sociology 53 (Introductory Anthropology) 

&QQWWGY 72 SOCIAL CBAKGE. 

A study of social changes arising through invention and culture 
contacts and of the f&etors ^hich influence acceptance or re- 
jection of these changes, Student© will pursue individual projects 
on social xaovements and other agencies of change. 
3 Class hours. Credit 3 

Prerequisites: Sociology 25 and 26 and permission of instructor. 

SPAKXSH 7 <X) S (II) IHTERMEDIATB SPANISH: HISPANIC CULT0SE. 

The methods and materials of this course elm to provide the stu- 
dent with insights into some of the most significant aspects of 
Spanish and Spanish-American civilisation. Intensive grammar 
review, readings, reports, compositions, and oral practice. 
3 Class hours; 1 laboratory hour. Credit 3 

Prerequisites: 2 or 3 years of high school Spanish and 

satisfactory score on placement examination. 
Students who have passed Spanish 1-2 with grade 
of B or better are eligible for this course. 



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1 






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WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 52 and 152. CONSERVATION 03? MTUKAL RESOURCES. 

For the summer session only. A description of and conservation 
of basic natural resources including sell, water, forests, wild- 
life, metallic and non-metallic minerals and the sources of 
energy including atomic energy. Course includes lectures, 
demonstrations and field exercises. 
3 2-hour laboratories 
2 4-hour laboratories Credit 4 



Mathematics 

It is reccsHsaended that the Mathematics Department be authorised to continue 
for one more year (1956-57) to experiment with sections in freshman 
Mathematics for Liberal Arts majors with course descriptions as follows: 

Mathematics 1. Introductory Mathematics I. Basic set -theoretic and 
axiomatic concepts, number systems and equations. A study of elementary 
functions, algebraically and by the methods of analytic geometry. 

Mathematics 2. Introductory Mathematics II. A terminal course intended for 
students whose curriculum calls for just one year of Mathematics. A con- 
tinuation of Mathematics 1, including topics from the calculus, statistics 
and mathematics of finance. 

Mathematics 4. Introductory Mathematics iy. A continuation of Matheasatics 1 
for those students intending to take further courses in Mathematics. 
Analytic geometry and trigonometry. 



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? 



GSAM&XE COimSES 

The Graduate School Council requests approval to offer the follow- 
ing courses la the Graduate School: 

250. FOOD C0S4RXMETR?. 

Composition and properties of food colorants. Methods of measure- 
aaent and specification of color in raw and processed food©. The nature, 
causa and control of color changes In the handling., processing and storage 
of food products.' The application of the Btasell, I.C.X. and other color 
sys tests to coussereial quality control and laboratory Inspection under 
governmental grading standards. 

3 lecture; one 2-hour laboratory; second semester. 
Prerequisites: Food Technology 191 and 192; Chemistry 165 and 166, Credit 3 

255. PSYCHOTHERAPY X 

Analyses of techniques of individual psychotherapy. The student 
sleet cm rently a pvactlcum in psychotherapy in which a therapy case, 
er supervision* will ba carried in one of the following facilities: child 
guidance clinic, student counseling center* state ajental hospital. 
Prerequisites ? Psychology 226, 235, 253, and 254. Credit 3 

256. P$OTGIEE&OT 11 

Analyses of group and specialised techniques of psychotherapy. 
.'. student will elect concurrently a practieum in *&lch supervised practice 
in one or mora group psychotherapeutic methods will he given. 
Prerequisites: Psychology ZZ6 t 235, 252, 253, 254, and 255. Credit 3 

200. SPECIAL H10BLEMS IS MECHaHXGAL ENSXKEE&XNG 

Special Investigational or research problesss in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing for advanced students. 'Hie scope of this work to be variad to meet 
specific conditions. 
Prerequisite as required by the problem. Credit 1*6 

211. THEORY 08? POS83R HACHIHES 

The thermodynamic and design aspects underlying power taachin^ry such 
gas and i a turbines, ii al combustion engines, rotary and reciprocating 
compressors, jat propulsion and rockets. 
Prerequisite: Mechanical Engineering 201. Credit 3 

200. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IH XHKJSIRIAL ESSIHEERISSS 

Special investigational or research problesss in Industrial engineer- 
g for graduate students. The scope of this work to he varied to asset 
specific conditions. 
Prerequisite sa required by the problem. Credit 1-6 

215, 3EMINA3 IK FRENCH 

A concentrated study of the many highly specialised techniques 
essential for language proficiency and teaching skill, the seminar offers a 
comprehensive training leading to the now requisite oral mastery of French, 
to correct grammatical techniques &t*d analyses, to accurate expli cation de 
tjxte, to linquistlcs and to present-day pedagogical procedures. Conducted 
by specialists in the fields of phonetics, linguistics and literature. Pro- 
cedures will &Q$t?id upon the sseet recent funds of information and will be 
directed toward the roost apparent needs of the group. Credit 2-3 

216. 3EMXKA& IN SPAMSH 

Comparable to 215 but in the field of Spanish. Credit 2-3 






I 



I 



UHXVEKSm OF msSMWS&TSS 
Jierst, Massachusetts 

List of Professional Appointments, SrOftiotions, Retirements, Resignations 

laxmsxy 1, 1955 - April 30 , 1956 



J? 



HEW APP0IWSMBBT3 

BSSTRuGTIGI 

Id Ko Adams, Instructor in Education, February 1, 1956 
>rns A, . Instructor in Dairy and Animal Science, September 1, 1955 

-son Bailey, Visiting Lecturer in English, September 1, 1955 
vid G, Bartlett, Instructor in Civil Engineering, September 1, 1955 
bert at Director, Bureau of Goverrflaent Research, Feb 8 13, 1956 

ard H, jr in History, September 1, 1955 

Curtis, Instructor in fisual Aids, February 1, 1956 
Vera M e H, Instructor in Home Economics* September 1, 1955 
--rine A, Dower, Instructor in Education, September 1, 1955 

• H. Mwards, Lstant Professor of Electrical Engineering, Sept. 1,1955 
, Fvans, Ai iant Frofessor of Dairy and Animal Science, January 12, 1956 
•d G e . Fsnae.ll , Assistant Srofessor of Education, February 1* 1955 
rvey F« Fisher, Instructor in Chemistry, February 1, 1956 
* John Gillespie, Director, Bureau of Government Research, January 15, 1956 
George B, Ooddard, Instructor in Floriculture, September 1, 1955 

Richards H. Harrington, tant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Sept. 1, 1955 
.•■Sin L« Ho bart , Instructor in Dairy and Animal Science, September 1, 1955 
Ins, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, September 1, 1955 
Professor of Clinical Psychology, September 4-> 1*5$ 
John E c 121. Instructor In landscape Architeoture, September 1, 1955 
John E« I idiusj Assist-: V'ofossor of Electrical Engineering, Sept. 1, 1955 
John A. ble fl Instructor in French, September 1, 1955 

••: Instructor in Physics, September 1, 1955 
* annon no, Pro 1 ? sptember 1, 1955 

Her, In r in Botany, September 1, 1955 
Instructor in Zoology, February 1, 1955 
rank * . r, Assistant Professor of Dairy end Animal Science, September 1, 1955 
aaoa «3 . . Instructor in Pseyhology, September 1, 1955 
Eva Schiffer, Instructor in German, September 1, 1955 
Ivin J* Simzaons, Instructor in Psychology, February 1, 1955 
as T* -h, Instructor in English, February 1, 1956 
Dana P, S3 -, Instructor in Zoology, September 1, 1955 
•thur A, Socolow, Assistant Professor of Geology, September 1, 1955 
•t J, Steamer, Instructor in Government, September I, 1955 
ttonald «T« Sutherland, Instructor in Entomology, February 1, 1956 
Victor £V is, Instructor in Wathezaatios, February 16, 1956 

bert F» Trocchi, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, September 1, 1955 
Cecilia Wolna, Instructor lu Katheiaatios, September 1, 1955 
James JJ. Ypsilantis, Instructor in Sociology, February 1, 1956 

PART TIME 
Cesar L Q Barber* Instructor in English p February 1, 1956 
Arnold Gollory, Instructor in Economics, February 1, 1956 



I 



Bart tire Instruction - Continued 

oTua T s Bellamy, Instructor in English, September 1, 1955 
bert M a Bolar isistaat Professor of Music, February 1, 1956 
Mward P. Clancy, Visiting Lecturer in Physics, September 1, 1955 
Herman L, Cloutier, Visiting Lecturer in Speech* September 1, 1955 

ce ?♦ £ay s Instructor in Sociology, February 1, 1956 
Albert L B ,D©Iisle ? Associate Professor of Itatany, February 1, 1956 
George B. %er, Instructor in Physical education, September 1, 1955 
Jferman K ftrickson, Instructor In Geology, September 1, 1955 

.cntine Giamatti, Instructor in Romance languages, February 1, 1956 
.Ralph W c Goodrich, Visiting Lecturer in Education, September 1, 1955 

ry F», W« Goas, Instructor in Sociology, Soptoiaber 1, 1955 
Louis S. Gresnbaum, Instructor in History, September 1, 1955 , 
rssaa Greenfeld, Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 1955 
I 'oyd F, Bays, Professor of Economics, September 1, 1955 
cald T* Jackson, Assistant Professor of Physical Education, February l, 1956 

,1. Instructor in Food Technology, September 1, 1955 
itohikian, Instructor in food Technology, September 1, 1955 
id F, Zoonard, ;ing leoturer in History, September 1, 1955 

. isiting Professor of Government, February 1, 1956 
Don frey, Instructor in Mucation, February 1, 1956 

Instructor in Psychology, September 1, 1955 
U 01ivor ; Instructor in Mathematics, September 1, 1955 
ard, Visiting Leetuer in Gsrsaan, September 1, 1955 
•vert 1 ' '-d P Instructor in Speech, February 1, 1956 
ward J. Instructor in Rainess Administration, February 1, 1956 
3* Mary L. Tapp, Instructor in Gorman, September 1, 1955 
rerett S. Turner, Jr., Instructor in Chemistry, February 1, 1956 
jene J. Tynan t Instructor in Geology, September 1, 1955 
Anthony J, Varjatod: islting Professor of neuropsychiatry # February 1, 1956 
ret So w ilson, Visiting Lecturer in Sociology, September 1, 1955 

Exzmimm statigb 

, Anderson, Assistant neseqrch Irofessor of Poultry Husbandry, Septo 15>1955 
i, Bason, Researeh Instructor in Veterinary Science, June 1, 1955 
tette €u Davis, Research Instructor, Feeds and Fertilisers, October 3, 1955 

B t Derby, Research Instructor in Horn® Economics, Jul; . 1955 
ill P. Ditmer, Assistant Research Professor, Seod Control, ikrch 7, 1955 

a Instructor Dairy and Animal Science, Febc 7, 1956 

ructor Dairy and AniasjL Science, March 15, 1956 
res, Research Instructor Feeds end Fertilisers, Sept» 19? 1955 
Cyril M. Martin, Instructor Resc* °ood Technology $ September 12, 1955 

instructor Research Dairy and Animal Science, March 21, 1956 
William E« H©ehl, arch Professor Veterinary Science, October 6, 1955 

■7r. , Instructor Eeseaf eh Feeds and Fertilisers, April 1, 1956 

feterinary Science, August 22, 1955 
•t Mc tluckersan. garch Professor ? Granberry Station, $fey 1, 1955 

s, Clara R Q Ficholson, .Instructor Research Agricultural Bcenomics, Feb, 1, 1956 
Ralston "ead, *?* , Instructor Research Bacteriology, April 1, 1956 



I 



F&r% Time ~ Experiment Station 



art, Besee: nstructor Food Technology, July 1, 1955 
Athsnasios Kiratsous, Instructor Research Food Technology, February 6, 1956 
Herman Lopes* Instructor Research Wildlife, February 20 , 1956 
Philip R. ;on, Jr. „ Research Instructor Agronomy, July 1, 1955 
£5yoshi Tsuji, Instructor Research Food Technology , July 1, 1955 
John M 9 Unite, Instructor Research Agroneiay, July 1, 1955 

mmsim servics 

John H e Br-agg, Assistant Extension Professor of Agricultural Economies., Feb a 15, 1955 
W. Hough, Assistant E&tsnsion Professor of Poultry Husbandry Feb* 15, 1955 
Lam J* lord, Assistant Extension Professor of Pomology, July 11, 1955 

Gilbert E. Mottla, Head of Department of Comsajnications, Iferch 7., 1955 

kg, Assistant Extension Prof essor of. Some Economics, Jan, 1, 1955 

fKGMCKMJQHS 

issrajcrioi 

lot £* Allen, Associate Professor of English from Assistant Professor - 

* I V, Cahlll, Jr», Dean of the College of Arts and Science from Professor 
of Government 

a, Associate Prof essor of Brench from Assistant Professor 

* I, Golwell, Professor of Accounting from Associate Professor 
5seph Contino, Assistant J^rof essor of Jftasio from Instructor 

nd J.-, a, Assistant Prof essor of Mechanical Engineering front Instructor 
. Swight •■'sistant Professor of Psychology from Instructor 

* Stovell C, Coding, E®a& of Department of Romance Languages from Professor 
Maxwell i. ; Iberg, Head of Department of English from Professor 

Tom S 8 Hamilton, Jr. , Assistant Professor of Landscape. Architecture from Instructor 
Randolph A, Jester, Assistant Professor of Floriculture from Instructor 

* Carl A, Keycer, Frof essor of Metallurgy from Associate Professor 

•7 Kor'son, Kc. aent of Sociology from S^ofeur: 
rthur S, %9Qk 9 Head of Department of Speech from Professor 
bert A. Potash, Assistant Professor of History from Instructor 

cof essor of Marketing from Instructor 
3ney iooiate Professor ef Economics from Assistant Professor 

rigor, ciat© Professor of Accounting fros Assistant Professor 
Odd?; bad, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering from. Instructor 
Glenn S. Tinder, Assistant Professor of Government froxs Instructor 
ps. Arm H 6 Trumbull, Assistant Professor of Education from Instructor 
$ras Q c Woodland, Assistant Professor of Geology and Mineralogy from Instructor 
Raymond %aan 5 Associate Professor of Education and Director of Audio Visual 
Center, from Assistant Professor 



I 



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Robert J. AHio, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, August 31? 1955 

Frank D. Bartlett, Jr., Instructor in Aainal Husbandry , August 31 * 1955 

Theodore L. Batke, Assistant Professor of Gnomical Engineering, August 31, 1955 

Robert A, Bennett f Instructor, Veterinary Science, February 28, 1955 

Richard W, Butler, Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, August 31, 1944 

Hall G. Buasoll, Instructor la Matheaatioe, August 31, 1955 

James W« Chadwiek, Jr., Instructor in Anis&l Husbandry, A ugust 31, 1955 

Malter B. Coor&d, Instructor In Qhemistry, August 31 » 1955 

Msrtin S, Cryan. Instructor In Food Technology, September 9 S 1955 

Jack F e Davis, Assistant -frofessor of Physical Education^ August 31, 1955 

Lyle G t Searden, Instructor in Zoology, August 31, 1955 

Catlt&rlne A. Dower, Instructor In' Education, January 31, 1956 

Snio Felliclottl, Instructor in Food Technology, August 31, 1955 

irthur J. Fields Instructor in Sociology, August 31? 1955 

Alson S e Pish, Jr., Instructor in Boaology, August 31 s 1955 

John G. Fisher, instructor in Geology, January 31, 1955 

F4ith C e Forbes, Instructor in Home Economics, August 31, 1955 

Alio© Qeorgantas, Instructor In Romance Languages, August 31, 1955 

Blrioh K Goldsmith, Associate Professor of German, August 31- 1955 

Bve Ii f Grublor, Instructor in Psychology* ^ugust 31, 1955 

ftrs. Katharine- &• Xrvin, Instructor in Hoss© Econosd.cs, August 31? 1955 

Willian B* Johnson, Instructor in Olericulture, January 31, 1956 

'.'in H 9 Ketchledge, Instructor in Botany, August 31$ 1955 
David W. Knudsen, Instructor in Electrical Engineering, August 31, 1955 
Henry Krats, Jr., Instructor in German, August 31, 1955 
Halter $. lake, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, May 31, 1955 

(after sick leave) 
Lorraine D, Lavalleo, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1955 
Bernard Mausner, Assistant Professor of Psychology, January 31, 1955 
Daniel J. McCarthy, Assistant Professor of Education, January 31, 1955 
Viillias. B. MeGlennan, Jr. , Instructor in Geology, August 31, 1955 
Qerald J. McLindon, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture, August 31, 1955 
Donald &. Hovel, Instructor in Civil Engineering, August 31, 1955 
John C, Nicholson , Instructor in Physics, August 31, 1955 
&on&ld J« Olson jj Instructor in History, August 31, 1955 
Donald So Scaeufele, instructor in Chemistry, August 31> 1955 
Ralph S Schvarts, Instructor in Mathematics, August 31, 1955 
Xeo F. Solt, Instructor in History, August 31, 1955 

Herbert N* Stapleton*, Bead of Pept« of Agrio. Engineering, January 31, 1955 
Ren© $ e Teube, Instructor in Bonancs Languages, August 31, 1955 
Theodore J. Wang, Assistant Professor of Physics, August 31, 1955 



f 



I 



I 



,-.£. 



m&IG®&$lpm * Continued 

BXPERB®KT STATIC® 

Leo P. Beninato, Instxiactor, Research, Veterinary Science, September 16, 1955 
Edward S, Berestka, Instructor, Boseareb, Feeds and Fertilizers, Sept* 2, 1955 
Joan T. Cody, Instructor, Research* Seeds & Fertilisers, July 20* 1955 
Richard H, Qrave*, Instructor, Bese&roh., Feeds & Fertilisers, December 23, 1955 
Nathan L e Shipkowita, Assistant Frofessor, Research* Veterinary Science, 

Febirairy 17, 1955 
Pearl Kane, Instructor, Research, Home Seonomics, May 31> 1955 

BSTKHS3DB SSE¥IGK 
•bort C. Staaons* Extension Mi tar, Xteeember 2, 1955 
Roger A, Moicott^ Assistant Professor, Sxionsion, Visual Aids, January 13, 1956 

mktm 
■msfmonm 

Harry C 6 Idndouiat* Assistant Professor of Dairy and Animal Science, December 1, 1955 
l) c Horace Nelson, Assistant Professor of Dairy and iinimal Science, March H* 1955 
Ray P»c Torrey* Professor of Botany, January 16, 1956 



SXTENSIOH SEMICO 
laurence ?« i«y* Scansion Frofessor in Charge of Youth Jrograras, March 10, 1955 

RBT2R£MEN!BS 
BfSmUCXXQH 

Charles F, Fraker, Head of Ttepartment of Eossanee Languages* August 31, 1955 
Church Hut 9 Assistant Professor of Floriculture* August 31, 1955 
otor a« Eice, Head of Department of Animal Husbandry, July 31, 1955 

SXTBNSIOB SERVICE ' 
Fayette R„ Branch, Extension Professor of Agricultural Economics, January 3, 1956 
Wsllesley 0. Harrington, E&tension Professor of Engineering, January 6, 195& 
V/lXbur H« Thies f Extension Professor of Sortieuliure* January 31* 1955 



* Previously' reported to Board of Trustees 



I 



SABBATICAL LEAVES 

The following sabbatical leaves are recoaaaended subject to appropria- 
tion of funds and to the usual conditions governing sabbatic leave, Those in- 
dividuals going for one-half year or one semester are to be granted leave with 
full pay and those going for one year are to be granted leave at half 



Frederick B. Chandler to take leave July 1, 1956 to December 31 , 1956. He 
will study the relationship of drainage, irrigation, root growth and the yield 
of cranberries. This study will be made in Hew Jersey, Wisconsin, California, 
Oregon and Washington and a manuscript will be prepared, on the basis of re- 
sults obtained. 

Katharine Allen Clark for the second semester 1956-1957 to gather material in 
France for a biography of Jean Giono, Modern French Novelist. Hiss Clark has 
translated some of Giono *s novels and will cosaplete the translation of those 
which have not already appeared in America. 

Byron Colby leave for one year from September 14, 1956 a to study recent de- 
velopments in Animal Science in order to improve the Extension Program and re- 
search in this area. Examples of new developments Include new fee da, the use 
of hormones and anti-blot ies in livestock rations. Professor Colby will 
establish residence at an eastern University. 

Albert E. Goes for the second, sessester 1936-1957 to complete a survey of 
psychological data and theory concerning the role of verbal processes in burners 
learning. This will be carried on in several centers of research including 
Yale University, University of Iowa, University of Minnesota and the Con- 
gressional Library. 

J. Henry Korson for second semester 1936-1957 to conduct research in the area 
of Industrial Sociology. Professor Korson* s project is entitled "National 
Comparisons of Occupational Mobility and Prestige." The work would be con- 
ducted in England and several Northern European countries. 



Bruce R. Morris for the second semester 1956-1957 to complete research for a 
book on which he has been working for some years on the subject of Economic 
and Social Planning. The research would be done in the Scandaaavlan countries 
and primarily in Denmark. 

Paul A. Swenson for the academic year 1956-1957 for research work in the field 
of Cellular Physiology. Professor Swenson has been carrying out a research pro- 
gram supported by the Atomic Energy Commission on the effects of ultra-violet 
light on the metabolism of radio active phosphorous by yeast cells. lie will 
continue this study at the Brookhaven national Laboratory at Upton, Long Island. 

Gilbert L. Woods ide for the second semester 1956-1957 to continue his research 
on cancer in mice. He has been invited to spend the semester at the Rational 
Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland where he will have an opportunity to 
learn the technique of using the electron microscope equipment which it is 
planned to include in the new Life Sciences Building at the University. 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May 15, 1956, 10:30 a.m., Butterfield House, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Haigis presiding 

The Finance Committee resumed its meeting which was 
adjourned May 8. 

At the request of the Chairman, Treasurer Johnson re- 
viewed in detail the Notes and Comments contained in the Report of 
the State Auditor on his examination of the accounts of the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts for the period from August 23, 1954 to 
August 15, 1955. Treasurer Johnson noted that many of the comments 
were informational , recording that certain changes and improvements 
and action on previous auditor's comments have been taken care of. 
It was noted that the comment on lack of reconciliation of monthly 
production reports has been corrected on the basis of spot checking 
and reconciliation. A full-time internal auditor, a position that 
the University has requested for the past three years in its budget 
request but has not yet received, would be necessary to make a 
complete check of production reports. Treasurer Johnson pointed 
out that whatever is produced at the University is a by-product of 
the instructional process rather than being the main business of 
the University and, therefore, it is questionable whether complete 
accountability can be maintained since much of what is produced is 
consumed in the instructional process on which no complete record 
is maintained. 

The Auditor noted that Daily Time Records on 
Comptroller's Form CB-28A were not maintained by all departments. 
The Treasurer stated that the Treasurer's Office, the Plant, Farm 



2075 



Auditor' s 
Report 



2076 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Department and the Boarding Hall maintain complete time records. 
All other departments of the University make weekly reports of 
absences to the Business Manager's Office. These weekly reports 
are part of the payroll system and are deemed sufficient to protect 
the Commonwealth in all respects. 

It was noted that production reports from the Waltham 
and Wareham Field Stations are now being received routinely. 

The Auditor noted a large surplus in the working capital 
fund of the University Store and suggested that the Trustees should 
review the mark-up policy of the Store with the object of reducing 
prices to the students so that a surplus would not be accumulated. 
Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the University Store had 
operated under very difficult handicaps and was in financial trouble 
a number of times prior to the time that the present Store Manager 
was employed. For the past four years the Store has been showing 
a surplus each year. This has been accumulated for the definite 
purpose of building up sufficient surplus so that the Store would 
be able to extend its operations and to provide funds for the 
support of the Student Union at the time that the Store became part 
of the Student Union operation in September, 1956. A Student Union 
Budget is being presented to the Trustees at this meeting which 
will transfer some of this surplus to the Student Union Account. 
In this way the University Store is serving its purpose of benefit- 
ing the student body. In addition, Treasurer Johnson pointed out 
that the Store operates on pricing policies established by the 
President which offers most items to the students at prices below 
normal list price for the item. Textbooks are sold 5% below list 
price. 






1 



rOMMITTEE 



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2077 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the Auditor's comments 
on student bills will be answered when the IBM billing system is 
placed in operation this summer. 

The Treasurer also stated that a system was being 
devised to give complete financial control of the traffic violation 
fines. No action had been taken previously on this comment since 
it was anticipated that the President might recommend a change in 
the whole system of handling traffic violations. After review by 
administrative officers concerned, it now appears as though the 
traffic violation fine system previously established by the Board 
of Trustees would be continued and steps taken to implement the 
control of payments. 

The Student Deposit System was discussed by the Trustees 
in detail and it was decided that no action would be taken at this 
time. 

The Auditor suggested that an opinion of the Attorney 
General should be obtained relative to certain questions pertaining 
to the policy of handling interest earned on pooled trust funds. 
Treasurer Johnson reported that the interest on pooled trust funds 
was handled in accordance with the policy established by the Board 
of Trustees in May, 1952. At the time this policy was established 
the Trustees gave careful consideration to all aspects of the 
problem and reviewed what was being done at other colleges and uni- 
versities in this area of accounting. Treasurer Johnson reported 
that the had discussed this sytem in detail with a number of large 
public universities and found that, without exception, they are all 
handling their trust and agency accounts in the same manner as 



2078 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

established here. Treasurer Johnson noted that the balance in the 

Trust Fund Interest Account exceeded $8,000 and, on recommendation 

of President Mather, the Trustees 

VOTED ; To transfer $5,000 from the Trust Fund Interest 
Account to the University Scholarship Fund for 
unrestricted scholarships to students to be 
awarded by the University Scholarship Committee. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Auditor's comments 
on lack of internal control and modifying or modernizing the account- 
ing system was, in his opinion, an unjustified comment in view of 
the fact that the entire system of internal checks and controls has 
been completely changed during the past four years and an IBM system 
installed that greatly modernizes the whole system. He pointed out 
that the complete change-over to modern methods had not been com- 
pleted within the next fiscal year. The system in use at the Uni- 
versity is approved by the Comptroller's Burea who has final control 
of the accounting system. As a result of the Auditor's comment in 
the previous year, the Comptroller; s Bureau sent a field agent to 
the University to review the system but in view of the installation 
of the IBM system it was decided by the Comptroller's Bureau to 
defer their review until the system had been installed. 

Treasurer Johnson also noted that in his discussion with 
the State Auditor, the State Auditor was attempting to make a 
recommendation that would re-enforce the University's request for 
an internal auditor. It was felt that this comment was directed 
towards that end. The Trustees noted that the Auditor's comment 
was general rather than pointing out specific defects in the system 
and, in view of the Treasurer's remarks, took no action. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Bartlett stated that it was his desire to have 
the Treasurer make a complete report to the Finance Committee each 
year on the Auditor's comments. 

The committee reviewed the investment holdings of the 

University and after discussion 

VOTED : To request the Treasurer to have the list re- 
viewed by competent investment counsel and 
report back to the committee. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the Student Union 
Building is nearing completion, that it will be ready in the fall 
of 1956, and that plans should be set up for its financial manage- 
ment. After discussion, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Student Union be organized with four funds to 
be established on the books of the University 
Treasurer as trust funds as follows: 



1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 



Student Union General Fund 
Student Union Reserve Fund 
Student Union Food Service Fund 
University Store (same account as now 

authorized) 



3 



That the Director of the Student Union shall 
have managerial responsibility for all four 
funds but that no funds shall be transferred 
to or from the Student Union Reserve Fund, 
the Student Union Food Service Fund, or the 
University Store Fund except as authorized 
by the Board of Trustees. 

That the Director of the Student Union shall 
have the authority to disburse all funds in 
the Student Union General Fund within the 
approved budget. Transfers between budget 
categories may be made in each fiscal year 
with the approval of the President. 

That all income to the Student Union not 
budgeted that is not specifically designated 
as income to the Student Union Food Service 
or University Store shall be added to the 
Student Union General Fund. 



2079 



Investments 



Student 

Union 

Funds 



2080 



COMMITTEE 



SLudenL 
Union 

judge l 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

That transfers of surplus funds x/ill be made 
annually from the Student Union Food Service 
Fund and University Store Fund to the Student 
Union General Fund on approval of the Board 
of Trustees. 

The committee then reviewed the Student Union budget as 
proposed by the Treasurer for the fiscal year July 1, 1956 through 
June 30, 1957. The Treasurer pointed out that necessarily this was 
a trial budget and would have to be adjusted after some experience 
in the actual operation of the building. The Committee questioned 
whether the salary of the director of the Union should be as high 
as the salary of the Business Manager of the University. 

President Mather said that proper operation of the build- 
ing depended on locating a good manager. He felt that the proposed 
beginning salary of the manager, $7,080, was proper and is in line 
with salaries paid to managers of other student unions. He agreed 
that salaries of other officers of the University are low and that 
it would be necessary to make strong effort in the next year or two 
to obtain raises for the professional staff. After study and 
discussion, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 

the following Student Union budget for the fiscal 
year July 1, 1956 through June 30, 1957. 

Income 



Student Fees 



First Semester 4,400 @ $10 
Second Semester 4,100 @ $10 
Summer Session 600 @ $4 



$44,000 

41,000 

2,400 



Transfers 



University Store - July 1, 1956 



$87,400 



40,000 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Game Rooms 



Bowling 
Billiard 
Ping Pong 




$20,000 
5,000 
1,000 


Rental of Space: 
Barber Shop 
Other - Special 


Events 


1,500 
1,000 



$26,000 



2,500 



Total Income 



$155,900 



Expenses 

Personal Services : 

Director Gr. 62 $7,080 

Assistant Director Gr. 52 (10 mos.) 4,350 

Assistant Director Gr. 52 (to be left vacant) 

Senior Clerk & Typist Gr. 14 (10 mos.) 2,300 

Junior Clerk & Typist Gr. 6 (10 mos.) 

Custodian (6) Gr. 18 (10 mos.) 

Hostess Gr. 18 (10 mos.) 

Hostess Gr. 18 
Students & part-time employees 



(vacant) 
15,000 

2,500 
(vacant) 

3,000 



Rent: 



To General Fund of Commonwealth to reimburse 
for state appropriation 



$34,230 



80,000 



Supplies & Expenses : 

Office & Administrative 
Janitor and miscellaneous 

Transfer: 



$2,000 
3,000 



To Student Union Food Service for Working 
Capital 

Program : 

For Student Union Activities and Programs 

Maintenance &. Replacements 

Furnishings & Equipment $2,740 
Bowling, including lease of 

pinsetters 4,700 

Game Rooms 2,400 



Reserve for Contingencies - Current Year 

Total Expenses 



5,000 



20,000 



5,000 



9,840 

1,830 
$155,900 



The Treasurer suggested the need for establishing a 

policy governing the disposition of certain old records. After 
discussion, it was 



2081 



2082 



COMMITTEE 



Disposal 
of Old 
Records 



Harrison 
Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees adopt the follow- 
ing policy relative to disposition of old 
records subject to the approval of the Commission 
on Administration and Finance. 

1. Vouchers supporting disbursements, including cancelled 
checks, should be retained for six full fiscal years 
(Statute of Limitations of Actions). 

2. Documents supporting the receipt of funds and general 
correspondence, should be retained for three full 
fiscal years. 

3. All books of original entry (including payroll journals 
and payroll earnings ledger cards), deeds, bequests, 
annual financial statements and other documents having 
a permanent value should be retained indefinitely. 

4. Leases, contracts, insurance policies, and other 
financial agreements not under seal should be re- 
tained for six fiscal years subsequent to the termi- 
nation date of the agreement. Contracts under seal 
and promissory notes should be retained for twenty 
years. 

5. Miscellaneous records, not included in the preceding 
categories should be retained for three full fiscal 
years. 

6. All records subject to disposition as outlined above 
should be destroyed by burning. 

The Treasurer reported gift from the will of Lillian S. 

Harrison of Amherst in the amount of $11,836.14. The terms of the 

gift as stated in the will are as follows: 

"In memory of my husband, Walter H. Harrison, I bequeath 
and devise one-third (1/3) of my estate to the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, for the pur- 
pose of holding and administering a fund to be known as 
the 'Walter H. Harrison Loan Fund 1 , said Trustees to make 
loans from the income thereof, without interest, to in- 
dustrious and deserving students of the University. In 
the investment and administration of this fund wide 
discretion, Ttfith broad and comprehensive powers, is hereby 
expressly conferred upon said Board of Trustees." 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept gift from 
the will of Lillian S. Harrison of Amherst for 
the purpose as stated above and to authorize the 
Treasurer of the University to establish an en- 
dowment fund in the amount of $11,836.14 for 
carrying out the purpose of the donor. 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Secretary of the Board con- 
vey the appreciation of the Board of Trustees for 
the Harrison gift. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 



^083 




■rzff* -< /€?* 



Secretary 



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2084 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Courses 



Ph.D. program 
in Zoology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

July 5, 1956, 11:30 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass 

Chairman Boyden presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Miss Buxton, Crowley, 
Desmond, Mrs. McNamara, President 
Mather, Secretary Burke 

The committee considered the new undergraduate courses 

proposed by various departments of the University and approved by 

the University Course of Study Committee and the President. 

After discussion and on the recommendation of President Mather, 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following new undergraduate courses 
of study. 

On the recommendation of the Graduate School Council and 

of the President, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the following new graduate courses. 

President Mather discussed the petition from the Depart- 
ment of Zoology for permission to offer the Ph.D. degree. He 
pointed out that all 12 members of the staff in Zoology are en- 
gaged in research work in addition to carrying normal reaching 
loads and that 11 of the 12 members have Ph.D. degrees. He said 
that both the demand for the Ph.D. in Zoology and the ability of 
the department to offer the necessary courses has been examined 
carefully by the Graduate School Council. After discussion and 
on the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the establishment of a Ph.D. program in 
the Department of Zoology. 



1 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Mather said that William Angus Laing had 
finished his senior year in June of 1956 lacking one 3-credit 
course for graduation. Immediately after graduation, Mr. Laing en- 
rolled at Boston University to complete this course. After about 
two weeks he became ill and was sent to a hospital in Springfield, 
his home town. His disease has been diagnosed as leukemia. 

The mother of this student has written to the President 
stating that the boy will not live and that the thing uppermost in 
his mind was his effort to gain his degree. The President re- 
ferred the mother's letter to Provost McCune who checked with the 
boy's doctors and acting for the faculty recommended that the de 
gree be awarded. It was the intention of the President to bring 
this matter to the Board on July 5 for their action but his second 
letter from the mother expressed doubt that the boy would live 
that long. He, therefore, went to Springfield and awarded the de- 
gree last week. 

The committee unanimously 

VOTED : To approve the action of the President and 
to award the degree Bachelor of Business 
Administration to William Angus Laing 
effective July 5, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name Mrs. N. 
May Larson, Extension Professor of Home 
Economics, Emeritus, effective on the date 
of her retirement May 31, 1956. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name Grunow 

0. Oleson, Extension Professor of Communications, 
Emeritus, effective on the date of his retire- 
ment May 31, 1956. 



2085 



William Angus 
Laing 



Bachelor of 

Business 

Administration 



N. May 

Larson, 

Emeritus 



Grunow 0. 
Oleson, 

Emeritus 



2086 



COMMITTEE 



University 

Faculty 

Senate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee Lhen discussed the proposed University 

Faculty Senate, copies of which had been mailed to all Board 

members at least a month prior to this meeting. The committee 

also considered the proposed preamble for the University Faculty 

Senate. Members of the committee pointed out a number of 

discrepancies in the wording of the Senate constitution and 

President Mather said that he was aware that the document contained 

a number of inconsistencies. He said that it was his intention 

to have the Senate appoint a constitution committee immediately 

on its formation and this committee should spend the first year 

in smoothing out the constitution. Committee members also 

raised the question as to the meaning of certain phrases and 

particularly questioned the use of the word "legislate". There 

was some doubt as to whether the Faculty Senate constitution 

should be acted upon at this meeting or whether more study 

should be given to the matter. Finally, after discussion and in 

order to bring the matter before the Trustees, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees establish a 
University Faculty Senate and to abolish 
the Educational Policies Council of the 
University; also that the Trustees should 
approve the attached preamble to the Uni- 
versity Faculty Senate and approve the 
attached constitution of the University 
Faculty Senate. 



The meeting was adjourne-d at 1:15 p.m 



Secretary 




PBB&&LE OF &CCBPM3CS FOR TfflZ mOVQBEQ USX9SSSXT7 &m&ffl - VfflXBBgm OF KASSACHBSmS 
Relationships between Faculty, Ministration, and Beard of Trustees 

Ilt should be understood in considering the proposed University of Massachusetts Senate 
tacefflQcndafiion, that the primary responsibility for over-ail policy of the University of 
Hassachusetts rests in the Board of Srusteen. The carrying out of such policy is the 
responsibility of the Administration* 

ftetther the Board of Trustees nor the President can surrender these functions to 
the individual ©embers of the facet ty s or to any group or organization of the faculty. 
Slhilo their advice and counsel should be sought and given proper weight , the responsibility 
and authority in administrative mttets regains in the Board and the President, 

•fee faculty, for example s should recognise that rules of tenure, of academic freedom, 
and similar scatters are not established for their benefits alone* Hhese rules are for 
the protection and prosotion of the welfare of the students* 

Such rules are for the purpose of providing a better faculty and better administra- 
tion, through security and freedosi to teach, without being unduly circumscribed or 
hampered by fear of reprisals, or less of jobs* 

These rules are not intended to snake faculty tseffihera free to interfere in admini- 
strative setters, it^pose their ideas upon the institution, or stir up conflict 'among 
faculty or students. 

Each teacher should be privileged to work vigorously within the institution for 

P"**at he believed to be right; he should have careful considerations of his problems 
the Head of the Department, the Dean, the Provost, and the President. A university 
nate, just like any other coraaittce or organisation of the University, should provide 
i medium for exchange of opinions, recoiasendations, and expression by all parties con- 
corned of the ideas and counsel necessary for determining sound policy and asking wise ' 
decisions in a democratic atsoosphere* r £o further clarify the relationship of the 
President with the Board of Trustees and the faculty, the following statement is aside 
regarding the duties and responsibilities of the President* 

President of the University 

1. She President of the university is the chief executive and administrative 
officer of the University. In this capacity he is responsibile for saanaging the opera- 
tion of the University and for carrying out and enforcing all policies and regulations 
adopted by the Board for the operation of the ISniversity and is given authority requisite 
to that &a$» 

2. The duties of the President shall be as follows: 

a. To attend ail meetings of the Board except when the Board requests otherwise. 

b« to submit to the Board fro® t&me to t&ae such recoisssendatioas and informa- 
tion concerning any phase of University policy or administration as may 
sceta necessary to the best interests of the diversity, 

c* To nominate all candidates for membership in the University faculty and staff* 

d. To call and preside over ©eatings of the faculty. 

e. To appoint such faculty ccmsittees as he debase necessary, and define their duties. 
£ . To act as the official medium of communication between the Board of Trustees 

and University officers and staff saeu&ers. 
g_» £o submit annually to the Board of Trustees for their approval a list of students 

recommended for graduation by the faculties of the various schools and colleges. 

Diplomas shall be signed by the President of Che University, 
h. To summarise and coordinate the budget estimates submitted by schools, colleges, 

divisions, and departments and prepare a budget adjusted to the income of the 

University and the needs of the work. 



I 



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&* < 



1. To be the official representative of the Board of Trustees in all matters 

; ;cctias the University which coiaes before the General Court, 
j. To be the official representative of the Board of Trustees in all mattes 

a£ .ag the University uSileli involve other dcfArtments of State 

GorerirKerit. 
k. To direct tho asr vat of ell plant £oci es» is ng buildings, off 

classrooms, laboratories, equipment and lead, and establish uniform rules 

pertaining to their proper use, 
1* To prepare such reports as are required by the Board, the State, and the 

Federal Goveraxaent* 



July 5, 1956 



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COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
July 5, 1956, 11:30 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass 
Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT 



It was 



Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Haigis, Whitmore, Treasurer Johnson 



VOTED : To ask the Treasurer to investigate the 

possibility of employing investment council 
and to report to the committee at its next 
meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 




ary pro ten 



2087 



COMMITTEE 



Freedom 
Bill 



O'Donnell 
Walter G. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
July 26, 1956, 6:30 p.m., Hotel Stabler, Boston, Mass 
Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson 

In the absence of Secretary Burke, Treasurer Johnson 
was asked to take the minutes of the meeting. 

Trustee Whitmore announced the signing of the "Freedom 
Bill" by the Governor that afternoon after enactment by both the 
House and the Senate without a dissenting vote. The bill becomes 
Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956. In signing the bill the Governor 
added an emergency preamble making the bill effective immediately 
so that the University might fill vacant positions with qualified 
candidates before the opening of the fall semester. 

The Trustees congratulated President Mather on his 
successful campaign to restore these personnel powers to the Board 
of Trustees and voted to spread on the records of the Board of 
Trustees the sincere appreciation of the Board of Trustees to 
President Jean Paul Mather for his outstanding accomplishment in 
promoting legislation that effectively restores the personnel 
policies of the University to the Board of Trustees. 

On the recommendation of President Mather and after 

careful examination of the credentials of the candidate, it was 

VOTED : To appoint Walter G. O'Donnell as Professor 
of Industrial Administration in the School 
of Business Administration effective 
September 1, 1956 at the starting salary of 

$6180 per year. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



President Mather discussed briefly the legislative pro 
gram as it affects the University. He stated that the capital out- 
lay as approved by the House contained items totaling $3,017,000 
for the University including the Library addition of $1,979,000, 
an ROTC Classroom and Armory Building of $400,000, and plans for 
the Science Center of $93,000. He also stated that the Governor 
had recommended $100,000 in the Supplementary Budget for add^' 
tional positions including new teachers. If these funds are appro- 
priated the University operating budget will be in fairly good 
shape for the coming year. 

Chairman Bart let t pointed out that under the Freedom Bill 
as it becomes effective, the Trustees have acquired increased 
powers and responsibilities. He stated that Trustee action on a 
policy basis would be required to implement the provisions of the 
bill and that such policy matter should be deferred until the 
matter could be discussed by the full Board of Trustees. President 
Mather and Treasurer Johnson pointed out that there were some 
routine personnel matters that required action before the opening 
of the school year and President Mather stated that some of these 
items requiring appointments to full professorships could be 
brought before the Executive Committee early in September whereas 
other actions such as the routine granting of step-rate increases, 
filling of vacancies below the grade of professor might Letter be 
facilitated on the basis of existing authorization in the by-laws 
of the Trustees whereby the President is empowered co act for the 
Board in these matters. After a detailed discussion of all aspects 
of the situation and on the recommendation of Chairman Eartlet 
it was 



Freedom 
Bill 



2090 



COMMITTEE 



Freedom 
LI 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric 
Company 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : That the President be authorized under 

le by-laws of the Trustees and the pro- 
visions of Chapter 556 of the Acts of 1956 
to act in the name of and for the Board 
of Trustees in all personnel matters re- 
quiring immediate action for the opening 
of the forthcoming academic year until the 
next meeting of the full Board of Trustees. 

President Mather pointed out that the passage of the 

Freedom Bill means that certain procedures for the processing of 

personnel papers xtfould have to be established with the Commission 

on Administration & Finance and the Division of Personnel 

Standardization. This would be a matter of exploration and 

negotiation with the Commission on Administration & Finance in 

order to establish the best operating procedures. After 

discussion and on recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To adopt the attached statement of pro- 
cedure for processing of personnel trans- 
. actions and to request the Treasurer to 
discuss these procedures with the 
Commission on Administration & Finance 
for the purpose of putting them into 
operation immediately. 

President Mather reported that the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company had offered to make available the half-time 
services of one of their high ranking engineers as a one-half time 
Assistant Professor in the School of Engineering. The company 
wished to be reimbursed for the services of this engineer at one- 
half the rate of the starting salary of an Assistant Professor. 
President Mather pointed out that this was another way in which 
industry was attempting to cooperate with engineering schools to 
provide them with teachers so that more engineers could be trained 
to meet the increasing demand. On the recommendation of the 
President, it was 



1 



;OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To authorize the President to enter into a 
contract with the Western Massachusetts 
Electric Company whereby the company will 
provide the services of Frank R. Longley 
for one-half time teaching in a positior. 
in the School of Engineering under the title 
of Assistant Professor at a fixed price for 
each academic year cf one-half the salary 
rate of an Assistant Professor. 

The Treasurer stated that Mr. Niels H. Larsen had 

rendered valuable service to the Trustees and the administration as 

an architectural consultant in the past two years and recommended 

that the services be continued for the fiscal year. It was 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer, Kenneth W. 
Johnson, to enter into an extension of 
the contract with Leland, Larsen, Bradley, 
and Hibbard of Boston for the continued 
architectural consulting service of Niels 
H. Larsen for the period July 1, 1956 to 
June 30, 1957. 

The Treasurer explained that it is necessary Lo execute 
contracts for repair work under the maintenance budget and to em- 
ploy designers from time to time to make plans and specifications 
for this work. This has been routine procedure in the past but a 
new contract form now in use requires that a certified vote of the 
Trustees be attached authorizing the Treasurer to sign. : was 

VOTED: That the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be 

authorized to execute in the name of and for 
the Board of Trustees contracts for repairs, 
alterations, and additions from funds appro- 
priated annually for these purposes. 

It was 

VOTED : That the Treasurer, Kenneth W. Johnson, be 

authorized to execute in the name of and for 

oard of Trustees contracts for engineer- 
ing and design services for preparation of 
plans and specifications for repair, altera- 
tions and additions. 



09 



Architectural 
Consultant 



COMMITTEE 



ional 
Cranberry 
Association 



Tuition 



ROTC 



Student 

Union 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported that the National Cranberry 

Association in settling previous account for the sale of the 1953 

cranberry crop had overpaid the University $66.62. They propose 

to recover this overpayment through withholding from dividends. 

It was 

VOTED : To approve the proposal of the National 
Cranberry Association of June 4, 1956 
to deduct an overpayment of $66.62 on 1953 
cranberry sales from accrued dividends. 

President Mather reported on the progress being made in 
cooperation with the other three colleges in the area. The 
objectives of the cooperation in the areas of exchange of students 
and exchange of faculty members will mean a saving to the institu- 
tions involved and a wider opportunity for the students. On the 
recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to waive the 
tuition for students at Amherst College, 
Smith College, and Mt. Holyoke College 
taking individual courses at the Univer- 
sity on a reciprocal basis whereby 
equivalent numbers of students from the 
University will be entitled to take courses 
at these colleges on a tuition-free basis. 

The President also announced that the Air Force had 
terminated the Amherst College ROTC program leaving a number of 
students part way through the course of instruction. Arrangements 
have been made with the Air Force and Amherst College to have 
these students finish their program at the University this fall. 
The cost of this program is borne by the Air Force. 

The Trustees discussed the progress being made on the 
Student Union Building. Trustee Brett reported that although the 
contractor was making every effort to complete the building, it 
was now impossible to have it ready for the opening of the fall 



rOMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

semester. It is anticipated that the building will be ready later 
in the semester. President Mather stated that it was his 
recommendation that the Student Union fee of $10.00 per semester 
be levied for the fall semester so that the Trustees might meet 
their obligations with the State. He indicated that a program 
could be organized and started even before the building was com- 
pleted. In addition it was recalled chat one of the considerations 
against the raising of tuition had been the increased cost because 
of the Student Union fee. No action was necessary on this 
matter since the Student Union fee was established to be effective 
September 1, 1956. 

President Mather also announced that the candidate for 
the position of Director of the Union approved by the Board at its 
last meeting, Mr. Thomas Culbertson, had withdrawn his candidacy 
after having been offered the position in favor of accepting a 
much higher paying position in industry. The President announced 
that he would recommend at the next meeting of the Board appoint- 
ment of a Union Director after candidates have been interviewed 
by the Provost, Treasurer and himself. 

The President also announced that the University was the 
recipient of a grant of $35,000 from the Carnegie Corporation of 
Mew York for the study of the teaching of foreign languages in 
preparation for the installation of modern language laboratories 
in the Liberal Arts Classroom building that is now being designed. 
This grant is significant in that it is the first time that the 
University has received a grant from a private corporation to im- 
prove the instructional program. 



2093 



Carnegie 
Corporai-ion 



2094 



COMMITTEE 



Hokkaido 
Univers J 



Water and 

Sewer 

Extension 



Association of 

Governing 

Boards 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The President also announced that the University had re- 
ceived a request from the International Cooperation Administration 
for the establishment of a cooperative exchange program with the 
University of Hokkaido at Sapporo, Japan. This project would be 
largely in the area of agriculture. The first step in negotiating 
the terms of this project will be for the President, the Dean of 
Agriculture and bther staff members to make a trip to Japan this 
fall to negotiate the terms of this cooperative arrangement. The 
cost of the project will be borne by the International Cooperation 
Administration and the Rockefeller Foundation. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that there is immediate need 
for the appointment of engineers to design extensions and improve- 
ments to the water and sewer distribution systems on the campus. 
Funds are available for this project. On recommendation of the 
Treasurer, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Commission on Administra- 
tion & Finance and the Division of Building 
Construction the employment of either whitman 
and Howard of Boston or Metcalf and Eddy of 
Boston for the preparation of plans and 
specifications for the extension of water and 
sewer distribution lines. 

Trustee Whitmore announced that the Association of 

Governing Boards of State Universities are to be the guests of the 

Board of Trustees at a conference on the campus en September 7, 8, 

9 and 10. He reviewed the program which has been established to 

date which features several outstanding speakers including the 

President of the University and the Governor of the Commonwealth 

in addition to a varied program of discussion and activities. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. Whitmore urged that all members of the Trustees save these 
dates for attendance at the conference. Information about the 
program will be distributed at an early date. 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:45 p.m. 



I 



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C*4^ — 



Ssrrre-fcary pro tern 



y^r^> (X/sJtfcfc^ Chairman 



2095 



2096 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



! 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Procedure appointment of Officers and Professional Staff in accord- 
's, the provisions of Section 13 of Chapter 75 of the General Laws as 
amended : 

1 . Hhenever the President; of the University or the Board of Trustees 
the University shall make an appointment to a. permanent position as estab- 
lished in the schedules of positions of the Joint W ind Means Commit: tee, or 
creates within fur ^preprinted therefor cy position, a "Report of 
Employment" £orm (perm, position) or "Eeport of Temporary Etaqsloyment" form 
tterap position) will be prepared as follows: 

Original Copy - White form - To Division of Personnel to be retained £ 

eir file 

Second Copy - green form - To Division of Personnel for recording and for- 
warding to the Controller o 

Fourth Cc-py ~ orange form « To Division of Personnel for recording and for- 
warding to Board of Retirement. 

Lfth Copy - blue form - Retained for University Personnel File, 

Sixth Copy - pink form - To University Payroll Section, Treasurer"' s Office, 

for authorisation to place on payroll., 

Bach report of employment will be numbered in numerical sequence by the University 

the upper right corner of the form. 

2» To provide essential personnel service data a copy of the "Personnel 
Service Requisition" form, filled in to cover pertinent information, will be 
attached to eact ? :he Report of Uoapioyment » 

3o Whenever a temporary appointment is made by the President of the 
Uni ity, the Treasurer of the University will certify on the form that funds 
are avail able to pay the salary 

4o ®feen. an appointment is made by the President of the University 
at a salary rate above the minimum, the Treasurer of the University will certify 

on the form that funds are available for the payment of the salary, 



- 2 



I 



5o When step-rate or salary increments are authorised by the President 

of the University* the "Salary Increase 5 ' foraa will be filled out and distributed 
•as follows: 

Copy I - To Mvision of Personnel for their records. 

Copy 2 - To Mvision ©£ Personnel for recording and forwarding to the 

Comptroller*, 

Copy 3 - Retained for University Personnel file. 

Copy 4 - To University Payroll Section for payroll authorisation. 

6. Whenever a salary increment is authorised fey the President of the 
University at more than one step or increment for the position in question, 
the Treasurer of the University will certify that: funds are available to pay 
the increment. 

7. fihen overtime compensation is authorised by the President of the 
University, a copy of the authorisation, certified as to availability of funds 

by the Treasurer of the University, will be forwarded to the Division of Personnel 
and an additional copy forwarded for the Comptroller. 

8. Appointment of professional staff by the President of the University 
for extra service mz& compensation in addition to their regular duties, will be 
processed the sasae as regular temporary appointments. 

9. Existing personnel procedures will fee continued for permanent 
positions in the non-professional staff. 

10. The University" s payrolls will provide the Comptroller with all 
necessary information pertaining to salaries and wages paid from funds appro- 
priated in subsidiary account -03, Services 3 Son- Employees, Ho other appointioent 
papers in this category will be processed except as specified above. 

7/26/56 



I 



I 



I 



Personnel Policy 



I 



II 



>rdf»c* with the provisions of Section 13 of Chapter 75 of 
the Genera I : ireeetttly ssanded, the following personnel policies 

shall • «n th< >n of tatvateity of ^assachnsetts. 

I„ at la hereby anthoffised to act for ssi is. the mm& 

stees isi ?lng out the provi&lcas of Section 13 of Chapter 
of the General "Lmm as anended, provided that ell appoissti^ta shall Is© is 
accordance ^'i£& the previsions of Article ?11I of the By~I<©ws of the Board of 
Trustee© and provided far »t the President to^ create within the limits 
of ' avails! ach te»poraxy and part-time pesltic may be necessary 
for the pros operation of tlm lfeive«ity« 

MNBneadationa to the President for appointment shall he 
, gfte spriate administrative officers of the University., 
appointments shall be at fche nlniasist of the salary schedale 
«e sad is; i General Laws m opriatioaa for the position in 

que • s herein provid« 

HhM Kidata for the position cannot be 

:o &«§ .. Lgmub ©alary for that position after a broad and ccssa- 

earcb hs *&* the appropriate administrative officer® 
ty shall certify to the President aa follows: 

"In accordance with the provisions of Section 13 of Chapter 
7,5 of the General Laws as arasndad, I hereby certify that 
(osKie of candidate) is qualified by 'previous 

'.perieace for & starting salary of rnww ^ w ^sw»|J _ 

do] per aniwK s , for appointment as (title of positionj — 
r uhe (acadasnie or calendar) year," 



I 






I 



llpsm receiving such a certification and otherwise approving 



». : 



I 



appointment , the President maj ms£e the appointment at e salary rata 
above t&* minima® hut not exceeding fch© aaxinuv ostablisked fey the 
salary sohednle for the position in ^oestioa-, provided funds* are 
available- 

salting an appointment at a salary rat© above the 
tBininuttf the president nay make as a condition of such appointment 

. st the p< nil I not &e entitled to further aanual increments . 
in salary until each tine as the individual may be recosaaended by Che 
administrative officers of the University os tine basis of 
a&eri terious service . 

4. (Ipoa recommendation of the appropriate administrative officexe of 
the PmIvsk* to -President nay great additional increments iss the salary 

, tc idti< person won'-. ■ se^nently be entitled in recognition of 

tkd acsosaisilisfeiaeEtj such increase to &® effective ms approved 
fey the- ^residont. In granting such increase President my make as a coalition 
that sab " 'manta will be ssde orc the 1 of continued meritorious 
servic 



« 



|i 



& as provide paragraph 3c and paragraph' 4 of this policy 
ail.-pc ' employed as of August 1, 1956, shall he entitled to the 
annual Btep-rate increase or increment in salary, unless she appropriate adteinis- 
trati< the University reeomaem sraaient be withheld 'for cause, 

in which case the President sfc • notify the person involved and afford hi® an 
opporj ty to be heard. If the Presidssit wltltfrolda the Increment fvv® an 
indlv having heard the appropriate a<skainistrative officers of the 

Univej ftd Cai iYidual 9 he "sshali notify him of his rigjhta under the 



genera ~ i^a 






6. $toi&v©r &' w&afoer of the professional staff is eiBployed fro® ©tat® 
foods tor service in the e&am&K sessions j or other periods outside the session- 
periods of the norsnal seadeBic year, fe@ shall he compensated at the $j»e 'rate 
of g>s gives daring site academic year. Ail ssach appointments shall 
fee saade fcy fcfee President 1b the s«e s&nner as regular appointments. 

7o Payneat for oveas shall foe la accordance with the General 
I*ows g mi€ Segniatlons of the Caseilssioa on.AdBinlstr&tica end 

Finance Asthosrisatioik to incur over&iaae for off leers sad professional staff 
shall be approved i*y the President or an officer of the University that he may 



8- She Tenure Policy contained in the Ey-Lasa of the Board of 
trust* Lane la force* Tcsmva for veterans is provided' for la the 

@ea 

Lag contained la this Stateaent of Personnel Policy shall 
titer the assisting By •Lavs of the Board of Trustees. 



t 



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OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

September 7, 1956, 11:30 a.m., Dining Commons, Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Chairman Haigis presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Haigis, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Chairman Haigis reported that the Treasurer, after con- 
sultation with members of the committee and with the approval of 
the Chairman, had sold 200 shares of Alcoa stock on August 2, 
1956 at a profit of $22,382.01 and the committee 
VOTED : To ratify and confirm this sale. 

The committee discussed the matter of employment of in- 
vestment counsel and inspected proposals submitted by various 
brokers. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To adjourn the meeting until October. 
The meeting was adjourned at 12:30 p.m. 




2097 



Stock 



retary 



2098 



COMMITTEE 



Chemistry 
Laboratory 



Science 
Center 



Steam 
Lines 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

September 7, 1956, 10:30 a.m., Dining Commons, Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Haigis, 
Taber, Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

The committee examined final plans for the addition to 

the Chemistry Building as prepared by Appleton and Stearns of 

Boston and 

VOTED : To recommend that these plans be approved 
by the Board of Trustees. 

The committee then examined preliminary plans for the 

Science Center as prepared by James H. Ritchie Associates of 

Boston. After discussion it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
plans as presented. 

The committee also voted to request the Treasurer to ob 
tain from Mr. Ritchie a set of elevations showing the building as 
it would appear from the center of the campus - it being under- 
stood that Mr. Ritchie is not to proceed with final plans for the 
Science Center until the Trustees have approved the exterior of 
the building after seeing these elevations. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the Hartwell Company of 
Providence, Rhode Island completed all work under contract #1 
project U-702 for steam extension as of August 9, 1956. He said 
that the work has been inspected and approved by Mr. David, the 
Chief Engineer. It was 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

contract #1 project U-702 by the Hartwell 
Company as completed August 9, 1956. 

The Treasurer reported that contract #2 project U-702 

for electrical extension by M. L, Schmidt Company of Springfield 

was also completed August 9, 1956 and has been approved by 

Mr. David, the Chief Engineer. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
contract #2 project U-702 by the M. L. 
Schmidt Company as completed August 9, 
1956. 

The President and Treasurer presented sketches prepared 
by Shurcliff and Shurcliff of Boston showing a proposed plan for 
the development of fraternity and sorority plots near Eastman Lane 
The committee indicated that it felt the proposed sketches were 
satisfactory and noted the sketch as a report of progress. 

The President and Treasurer showed sketches of a propose^ 

development of athletic facilities to the west of the present 

athletic area. These sketches were prepared by the Landscape 

Architecture Department of the University in conformity with plans 

of Shurcliff and Shurcliff. Sheet #1 of the proposed sketches 

showed a complete layout for future years of athletic fields, 

buildings and stadium. Sheet #2 showed immediately needed 

athletic fields. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
layout in sheet #2 of sketches prepared by 
the Landscape Architecture Department 
dated August 1956. 

The committee examined sketches of the statue of 

Metawampe and recommended that the Trustees approve location of 

this statue in front of South College - expenses to be borne 



2099 



Electric 
Lines 



Athletic 
Facilities 



Metawampe 



2 LOO 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



from funds given by the class of 1956. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 



[ 




Secretary 



! 



» 



OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON RECOGNIZED 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

December 1, 1956, 10:30 a.m., Dining Commons, Univ. of Mass 

Chairman Crowley presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Boyden, Brown, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, Taber, President Mather, 
Provost McCune, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke and the following 
members of the Executive Committee 
of the University Athletic Council: 
Allan, E. E. Anderson, Donohue, 
Hackamack, McGuirk 



Chairman Crowley called on President Mather for an intro- 
ductory statement. The President said that the meeting was an in- 
formal workshop session to discuss various situations and condi- 
tions which bear on the athletic policy of the University. Uni- 
versity policy is not a matter for final determination by 
committees of the University but rather is the prerogative of the 
administration and the Board of Trustees. Therefore, this meeting 
should not be considered as a precedent by any campus group or 
committee for direct approach to Trustees on general policy 
matters. The President said that he recognized the right of per- 
sons to appeal individual problems or grievances to the Trustees, 
but at the same time everyone must recognize that individuals are 
not free to approach Trustees on matters of general policy, except 
through the administration. 

On the other hand, President Mather said, no previous 
administration of the University has taken a positive policy 
position on the subject of intercollegiate athletics. He said the 
time has come to develop a policy that will be widely recognized 
throughout the campus community. He is convinced that at the 



2101 



2L02 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

present time there is an overt and covert attitude of apathy 
toward athletics on the part of many faculty members. To offset 
this apathy he is interested in developing a sound policy state- 
ment of support for intercollegiate athletics. He intends to pre- 
pare and take this policy statement to the full Board of Trustees 
and also to announce this policy to the faculty. 

The committee reviewed the intercollegiate athletic history of 
the University, past football records, the Yankee Conference, 
publicity, managerial situation, scholarships, and the concession 
program. Various means were considered for strengthening the 
athletic program. President Mather said that he has no intention 
of lowering entrance requirements or graduation requirements 
especially in view of the tremendous pressures which exist and 
will continue to exist for admission to the University. This 
being the case, he said the problem of developing better teams re- 
duces itself to a problem of economics. He does not object to 
grants-in-aid openly given by or through the University as com- 
pensation for the time which young men give to the athletic progran 
Such grants are given by most colleges in recognition of the fact 
that needy students do not have time to work, study, and play 
football as a competitive "spectator" sport. 

Chairman Crowley said that he feels the University can up- 
hold its academic requirements and still field good teams. Pro- 
fessor McGuirk agreed that there is no need for lowering academic 
requirements but urged that means be found for providing a better 
program for scholarships. 

Dr. Boyden said that there is no question of the value and 
place of athletics in a University program and that proper 



I 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

finances are an important corollary. He said that it is possible 
to have high academic standards and good teams. He would not 
like to see the present high standards reduced. He urged the im- 
portance of developing a strong intramural program as a means of 
developing good athletes. Such program is possible only if funds 
are available for good intramural coaching. He raised question 
as to whether the freshman and sophomore program may be out of 
balance in difficulty with the last two years. He suggested more 
attention to a tutorial program to cut down losses before 
graduation. 

There was discussion of the use of vending machine 
income for athletic scholarships and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
following distribution of commissions from 
vending machines located in dormitories: 

To the Dormitory Social Fund 

(administered through the RSO committee) 

5% of first $10,000 of net profits from commissions 
8% of next $7,000 of net profits from commissions 
107 o on all net profits over $17,000 from commissions 

The balance to accrue to the University Athletic 
Council for the purpose of scholarship aid. " 

President Mather gave the following summary of the meet- 
ing. Since the meeting was in the nature of a workshop no 
publicity will be given to the discussions. The administration 
will prepare a policy statement in cooperation with the Athletic 
Department for submission to the Trustees. This will be mailed 
to the Board in December for their consideration and action at 
the January meeting. If the Board adopts a statement, such state- 
ment will then be published. The administration will follow up 



2L03 



Vending 
Machines 



2L04 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



further by preparing detailed statement of administrative 
specifics for publication in the University Bulletin. 
The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



I 



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IOMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

December 12, 1956, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, 
Univ. of Mass., Amherst 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Taber, Whitmore, 

President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke and by invitation of 
the committee Mr. Sidney Shurcliff , 
Messrs. Otto and Procopio from the 
Department of Landscape Architecture 
and Mr. Brehra, Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds 



Mr. Shurcliff presented the Master Plan of the Univer- 
sity as developed to date. After his presentation, Chairman 
Whitmore called on all those present to express their views con- 
cerning the plan. President Mather and Treasurer Johnson said 
that the plan was very well adapted to the needs of the Univer- 
sity and that in developing the plan, Mr. Shurcliff had con- 
sulted constantly with deans and department heads so that the 
plan represents the views of everyone on campus concerned in 
campus development. 

Professor Otto said that he is very much pleased with 
the area locations, with the location of buildings and with the 
provision of handling of traffic. In his view the whole plan is 
excellent. Mr. Brehm said there is good provision for handling 
extension of utilities. Mr. Procopio said that the timing called 
for in the plan is well thought out in that no old facility will 
be destroyed before its replacement is provided. 

Trustees Brett and Taber seriously questioned the 
suggested relocation of the north-south road now running through 



2105 



Master 
Plan 



2106 



COMMITTEE 



Sororities 

and 
Fraternities 



Machraer 
Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the heart of the campus. They agreed that the present road 

should be discontinued as a through way, even though a local 

through way, but objected that the proposed relocation of this 

road will still leave 1500 students living in dormitories on the 

east side of the road and having to walk to classes and other 

college activities on the west side of the road. After further 

discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve and 
accept the Master Plan as proposed by 
Mr. Shurcliff with the understanding that 
further study will be given the relocation 
of the north-south road through campus. 

The committee discussed with Mr. Shurcliff the area to 
be set aside for fraternity and sorority development. In general 
this area is located along the north east boundaries of the Uni- 
versity property near Eastman Lane. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees offer lots 
for sale to fraternities and sororities 
in the area near Eastman Lane as shown on 
the Master Plan subject to terms and con- 
ditions to be established by the Board of 
Trustees. 

The committee discussed possible provisions to be in- 
cluded in the deeds of sale but felt that final actions on these 
provisions should be deferred until legal counsel has had opportu- 
nity to consider such provisions. 

The committee visited Machmer Hall, the new Classroom 

Building, and after inspection 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept Machmer 
Hall as completed October 3, 1956 as Mass. 
State Project U-701, M. J. Walsh and Sons, 
Contractor, acceptance to be subject to the 
completion of certain minor items to the 
satisfaction of Treasurer Johnson. 



DMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee visited the Student Union Building and 
inspected progress. Locations were considered for the following 



new buildings : 

1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 

It was 



School of Education 

ROTC Building 

General Maintenance Building 

Dormitory #15 

Faculty-Married Student Housing 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following locations for new buildings as 
indicated: 

School of Education on the former Montague property 
along North Pleasant Street on the north edge of 
the University property. 

The ROTC Building to the west of the Liberal Arts 
Annex . 

The General Maintenance Building north west of 
the Power Plant. 

Dormitory #15 back of Fernald Hall - subject to 
reconsideration if borings prove this site to be 
unsatisfactory. 

The Faculty-Married Student Housing on the soccer 
area along Lincoln Avenue. 

Parking needs of the campus were reviewed by the 

committee with Mr. Shurcliff and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
location of a new parking area to the west 
of Hasbrouck Hall. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University has re- 
ceived approval from all state officials concerned for the re- 
moval of North College and as of today has received written 
approval from the Commission on Administration and Finance. It 



was 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
removal of North College at an early date. 



2107 



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Program 



Parking 
Area 



North 
College 



21.08 



COMMITTEE 



Welcome, 
Frank T. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Treasurer reported that there is a plaque on the 
exterior wall of North College marking the site of the establish- 
ment of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. The Phi Sigma Kappa group 
would like to save this plaque and arrange its replacement on the 
present site after North College is removed. The committee indi- 
cated its approval of the general idea and requested that the 
matter be brought before it after definite plans for a suitable 
marker have been formulated. 

Mr. Johnson reported that Mr. Frank T. Welcome of 
Fearing Street has expressed concern over the fact that the Uni- 
versity owns a 20-foot strip which leads from Fearing Street into 
the University grounds within 2 feet of Mr. Welcome's house. 
The University has made no use of this strip but Mr. Welcome is 
concerned over future developments. He has offered to purchase a 
20-foot strip from his neighbor and to convey this strip to the 
University in exchange for the strip beside his house. After 
discussion, it was 

VOTED : To table this proposal. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:30 p.m. 




Secretary 



OMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE 
December 17, 1956, 11:00 a.m., Stockbridge Hall, U of M, Amherst 

Chairman Brown presiding 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Brown, Hawes, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke and by invitation of the committee 
Messrs. Sieling, Jeffrey, Dayton and 
Allan of the College of Agriculture 

President Mather called attention to the duplicated - 
statement entitled "Twenty-Plus Questions" by Dr. John A. Hannah, 
President of Michigan State University. He said this statement 
points up the importance of maintaining a strong agricultural pro- 
gram especially in a situation such as ours where the University 
is the only institution in the State concerned with higher educa- 
tion in Agriculture. 

The committee then discussed the differences between the 
existing memorandum of understanding between the University and 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture on the subject of conduct of 
extension work and the proposed revision of this memo. Dean 
Sieling pointed out that the extension program in Massachusetts 
was well started before the Federal Extension Service was 
established. Furthermore, the county Boards of Trustees were 
established to carry on extension work on a local level in 
cooperation with the State University. Because of this early 
establishment and tradition of local autonomy, Massachusetts has 
retained a system for many years which differs from that in most 
states. Under the existing memorandum of understanding, our local 
autonomy is recognized. 



2109 



U. S. Depart 
ment of 
Agriculture 



2L10 



COMMITTEE 



Memorandum of 
Understanding 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The new memorandum of understanding proposed by the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture would make the Massachusetts ex- 
tension program subject to Federal control in all its aspects. 
Present State employees who receive some funds from Federal 
sources would be considered as Federal employees and would lose 
such rights as state retirement, state insurance and other 
privileges. Therefore, a counter proposal has been drawn up and 
this is offered for consideration by the Trustee Committee on 
Agriculture and Horticulture. 

The committee considered the proposed memorandum of 
understanding as modified by the College of Agriculture and agreed 
with its general purpose. However, the committee suggested some 
modification which would point out the dates of the establishment 
of the county extension service organizations and which will spell 
out clearly the fact that extension service employees in Massa- 
chusetts would continue to be State employees. After discussion, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the proposed memorandum of understanding between 
the University of Massachusetts and the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture on cooperative exten- 
sion work in Agriculture and Home Economics as 
modified by the College of Agriculture and as 
amended by the committee with the understanding 
that the document is subject to legal review be- 
fore approval by the full Board of Trustees 

Dean Sieling and Associate Dean Dayton reported on the 

use of new Federal funds in the present and proposed research and 

extension programs. Copies of these reports are attached. 

Trustee Hawes suggested that there is a need for more cost studies 

as a buide for producers of various agricultural products. 

Trustee Brett supported Mr. Hawes view and urged the need for more 



:OMMITTEE 



/ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

agricultural studies on an industry-wide basis, 

The committee also questioned the proposed establishment 
of a position of Home Demonstration Agent at Large to work with 
families in Boston and Suffolk County. 

On the recommendation of Dean Sieling and President 

Mather, the committee 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees name the service 
department of the College of Agriculture the 
"Research and Production Service Department" and 
name the person in charge of this department 
"Head of the Department of Research and Production 
Service" with the rank of Associate Professor "A" 
effective February 1, 1957. 

The committee considered proposed gift of the Henry E. 

Warren farm in Ashland, Massachusetts. Trustee Brown, President 

Mather and Dean Sieling visited this farm on November 24, 1956. 

As a result of this visit, these men believe that the Warren farm 

would not be suitable for use by the University. After discussion, 

it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees not accept the 
proposed gift of the Henry E. Warren farm in 
Ashland, Massachusetts, and to convey to 
Mr. Warren their appreciation of his offer. 

Trustee Brown reported that in June of 1956 Mr. Francis 
R. Appleton, Jr., owner of the Appleton Farms in Ipswich, Massa- 
chusetts, offered these farms to the University. Mr. Brown, 
President Mather and Dean Sieling visited the Appleton Farms on 
November 23, 1956 and believe that the University should seriously 
consider the acquisition of this property. The farm is located 
at the Ipswich-Hamilton line and consists of 1,000 acres of 
pasture, woods and cultivated land. There are several houses on 
the property. Two of the houses are quite large and of considerabl 



2L11 



Research and 
Production 
Service De- 
partment 



Henry E. 
Warren Farm 



Appleton 
Farms 



2112 



COMMITTEE 



Mastitis 



Land 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



value. The other buildings are in good repair. The Appletons 

have offered to establish an endowment for the maintenance or 

partial maintenance of the farm. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 

continuation of negotiations with Mr. Francis 
R. Appleton, Jr. to determine what arrange- 
ments he wishes to make relative to his pro- 
posal to give the Appleton Farms to the Uni- 
versity and to establish a trust fund for 
their maintenance. 

Dean Sieling reported that since 1947 the University has 
operated a mastitis control program. A fee of 25 cents per sample 
has been charged. Over the past several years the number of 
tests has been decreasing with the result that only a very few 
private herd owners have taken advantage of this service in the 
last two years. 

Dean Sieling said that in his opinion an unhealthy 

situation has developed in that farmers are attempting to treat 

mastitis or suspected mastitis on their own and are using 

penicillin in sufficient amount to affect persons who are 

allergic to penicillin. Trustee Hawes joined xtfith Dean Sieling 

in proposing that the 25 cent fee be eliminated so that farmers 

will be encouraged to use the testing service maintained by the 

University. After discussion, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
elimination of the 25 cent per sample fee 
for mastitis testing effective February 1, 
1957. 

The committee discussed land needs of the College of 

Agriculture. President Mather reported that the Ways and Means 

Committee of the Legislature is now favorably disposed to the 



1 



lOMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

purchase of the land recommended for acquisition by the College of 

Agriculture a year ago. He made strong effort to gain favorable 

consideration of a budget item for land purchase last year but 

other needs had greater priority in the minds of members of the 

Legislature. This year he feels that the Legislature will approve 

the item for land acquisition. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To table discussion of the land purchase 
program. 

Dean Sieling said that because of the salary in- 
creases for State employees voted by the last Legislature, it 
will be necessary to raise the price for the dairy cattle certi- 
fication service. This program has always been operated on a 
self-supporting basis and he believes that it is best to continue 
to operate this program without State subsidy. After discussion, 
the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the following rates effective February 1, 1957. 



Advanced Registry 



Up to 12 cows 3X or 
Up to 18 cows 2X 



1 string $30.00 
Additional strings 27.00 



13 to 16 cows 3X or 
19 to 24 cows 2X 

$35.00 
32.00 



Herd Improvement Registry 



Up to 20 cows 3X or 
Up to 30 cows 2X 

1 string $20.50 
Additional strings 17.50 



21 to 30 cows 3X or 
31 to 45 cows 2X 

$25.50 
22.50 



2L13 



Dairy Cattle 

Certification 

Service 



2114 



COMMITTEE 



, Brucellosis 



Cattle 
Testing 

U. S. Depart 
merit of 
Agriculture 



Exchange of 
Students 



Agricultural 
Engineering 



Food 
Technology 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Sieling reported that Mr. Hawes , in his capacity as 

Commissioner of Agriculture, has requested the use of certain 

space in the old Waltham Field Station building for the testing of 

cattle for brucellosis. By law his department is charged with the 

obligation of testing for brucellosis. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the setting up of a memorandum of agree- 
ment between the University of Massachusetts 
and the State Department of Agriculture 
relative to use of space at the Waltham 
Field Station by the Department of Agri- 
culture for the brucellosis testing program. 

President Mather recalled that the Board of Trustees has 
agreed in principle on the exchange of students among the land- 
grant colleges in New England for the purpose of eliminating ex- 
pensive duplication of certain course work. Recently the College 
of Agriculture of the University of Maine has requested that an 
agreement be made whereby students in Food Technology at the Uni- 
versity of Maine complete two years there and then transfer to the 
University of Massachusetts for the last two years. In exchange 
Maine would accept University of Massachusetts students who wish 
to complete their last two years at the University of Maine major- 
ing in Agricultural Engineering. 

The committee agreed that the exchange of students in 
this manner would be in the interests of economy and efficiency 
and 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve 
the establishment of a memorandum of agreement 
between the Trustees of the University of Maine 
and the Trustees of the University of Massachu- 
setts setting up a reciprocal arrangement for 
the training of students in Food Technology at 
the University of Massachusetts and the train- 
ing of students in Agricultural Engineering at 
the University of Maine wherein the first two 
years of training would be completed at the 
home institution of the student and the final 
two years at the institution in the other state 
with tuition to be charged at the in-state rate. 

Dean Sieling reported gift of 11 Jersey cows from 
Mr. Weston Howland of Milton, Massachusetts. The cattle are from 
his farm in Brattleboro, Vermont. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:25 p.m. 




Secretary 



2L15 



Howl and , 
Weston 



2L16 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To be modified in accordance with 
suggestions by the Trustee Committee 
on Agriculture 

MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING 

BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AND THE 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

ON COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND HOME ECONOMICS 



Whereas the University of Massachusetts has under its control Federal and 
State funds for extension work in agriculture, home economics, and related sub - 
jects which are and may be supplemented by funds contributed for similar purposes 
by counties and other organizations and individuals within said State, and the 
United States Department of Agriculture has funds appropriated directly to it by 
Congress which can be spent for extension work in the State of Massachusetts, and 

Whereas the Commonwealth of Massachusetts established an Extension Service 
at the Massachusetts Agricultural College under a Director of Extension in 1909 . 
and 

Whereas the Smith -Lever Act establishing Cooperative Extension Work on a 
nation-wide basis was accepted both in funds and in purpose by the General Court 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts under an Act of Acceptance approved June 29 , 
1914, and 

Whereas certain County Extension Services were established in Massachusetts 
under Chapter 128 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth, and 

- ■ ■- ■--■ - ■ ■ r ■ - i — ■ -■ - - i ■ i — i . i ■ i n i " ' i - i i i - ti i u i m a i ru i — r - ■ 1 1 . i i i - - - -l " -~ ■ '~ 

Whereas certain other counties in Massachusetts were authorized to conduct 
Extension programs under Chapter 74 of the General Laws of the Commonwealth ; 

Therefore, with a view to securing economy and efficiency in the conduct of 
extension work in the State of Massachusetts the President of the University of 
Massachusetts acting subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees of the 
said University of Massachusetts and the Secretary of Agriculture of the United 
States, hereby execute the following Memorandum of Understanding with reference 
to cooperative relations between said University of Massachusetts and the United 
States Department of Agriculture for the organization and conduct of extension 
work in agriculture and home economics in the State of Massachusetts. 

I. The University of Massachusetts agrees: 

(a) To organize and maintain at said institution a definite and distinct 
administrative division for the management and conduct of all coopera- 
tive extension work in agriculture and home economics, with a Director 
selected by the institution and satisfactory to the Department. 

(b) To administer through such division thus organized, known as the 
Cooperative Extension Service , any and all funds it has or may hereafter 
receive for such work from appropriations made by Congress or the State 
Legislature, by allotment from its Board of Trustees or from any other 
sources; 

(c) To accept the responsibility for conducting all educational work in 
the fields of agriculture and home economics and subjects related 
thereto as authorized by the Smith -Lever Act as amended and other 
Acts supporting cooperative extension work, and such phases of other 
programs of the Department as are primarily educational, which the 
Department has been authorized to carry on within the State. 



- 2 - 



II. The United States Department of Agriculture agrees: 

(a) To maintain in the Department a Federal Extension Service which, under 
the direction of the Secretary, (1) shall be charged with the adminis- 
tration of the Smith-Lever Act as amended and other Acts supporting 
cooperative extension work insofar as such administration is vested in 
the Department; (2) shall have primary responsibility for and leader- 
ship in all educational programs under the jurisdiction of the Depart- 
ment (except the graduate school); (3) shall be responsible for 
coordination of all educational phases of other programs of the Depart- 
ment, except the graduate school; and (4) shall act as the liaison 
between the Department and officials of the Land-Grant Colleges and 
Universities on all matters relating to cooperative extension work in 
agriculture and home economics and educational activities relating 
thereto. 

(b) To conduct through the University of Massachusetts all extension work 
in agriculture and home economics and subjects relating thereto 
authorized by Congress to be carried on within the State except those 
activities which by mutual agreement it is determined can most appro- 
priately and effectively be carried out directly by the Department. 

III. The University of Massachusetts and the United States Department of Agriculture 
mutually agree: 

(a) That subject to the approval of the President of the University of 
Massachusetts and the Secretary of Agriculture, or their duly appointed 
representatives, all cooperative extension work in agriculture and home 
economics in the State of Massachusetts involving the use of Federal 
funds shall be planned under the joint supervision of the Director of 
the Cooperative Extension Service of Massachusetts and the Administrator 
of the Federal Extension Service; and that approved plans for such 
cooperative extension work in the State of Massachusetts shall be 
carried out through the Cooperative Extenp lon Service of the University 
of Massachusetts in accordance with the terms of individual project 
agreements. 

(b) That all State and County personnel employed by the University of 
Massachusetts and the County Extension Service Trustees who are also 
granted appointments by the Department as cooperative agents for ex - 
tension work In agriculture, home ec on omics, and related subjects shall 
be joint representatives of the University of Massachusetts and the 
United States Department of Agriculture, unless otherwise expressly pro- 
vided in the project agreement. Such personnel shall be deemed governed 
by the requirements of Federal Civil Service Rule No. IV relating to 
political activity. 

(c) That the cooperation between the University of Massachusetts and the 
United States Department of Agriculture shall be plainly set forth in 
all publications or other printed matter issued and used in connection 
with said cooperative extension work by either the University of 
Massachusetts or the United States Department of Agriculture. 



i 






I 



- 3 - 

(d) That annual plans of work for the use of Smith-Lever and other Federal 
funds In support of cooperative extension work shall be made by the 
Cooperative Extension Service of the State of Massachusetts and shall 
be subject to the approval of the Secretary of Agriculture in accord- 
ance with the terms of the Smith-Lever Act as amended or other 
applicable laws, and when so approved shall be carried out by the 
Cooperative Extension Service of the said State of Massachusetts. 

XV. The University of Massachusetts and the United States Department of Agri- 
culture further mutually agreet 

(a) That the Department of Agriculture shall make final determination on 
any proposed supplementary memoranda of understanding or similar docu- 
ments, including those with other agencies, affecting the conduct of 
cooperative extension work after consultation with appropriate desig- 
nated representatives of the Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, and 
that such supplementary memoranda of understanding or similar documents 
shall be activated in the State of Massachusetts only with the mutual 
agreement and consent of the Director of the Extension Service , 

(b) That the University of Massachusetts will make arrangements affecting 
the conduct of cooperative extension work with agencies of the Depart- 
ment, or with other Federal agencies, only through the Administrator of 
the Federal Extension Service, or in accordance with an existing general 
agreement which has been approved by him. 

(c) That all memoranda and similar documents hereafter executed affecting 
cooperative extension work, whether between agencies of the Department 
or between State Cooperative Extension Services and agencies of the 
Department, shall be within the framework of, and consistent with the 
intent and purpose of, this Memorandum of Understanding. 

(d) That all memoranda and agreements affecting policies in cooperative 
extension work shall be reviewed periodically by appropriately desig- 
nated representatives of the Land-Grant Colleges and Universities and 
the Secretary of Agriculture for the purpose of determining whether 
modification is necessary or desirable to meet more effectively current 
developments and program needs. 

V. This memorandum shall take effect when it is approved by the President of 
the University of Massachusetts and the Secretary of Agriculture of the 
United States, and shall remain in force until it is expressly abrogated in 
writing by either one of the signers or his successor in office. The agree- 
ment executed June 29, 1914 shall be deemed abrogated upon the effective 
date hereof. 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DATE BY 



President 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
DAT E BY 



Secretary 



1 T jr J ' 



'D 






1 




•.•• 






■i'jr 



i <4 ' 






..-! ' 



•r- 












VI 



ri i 



TRENDS IN EXTENSION PROGRAMS AND USE OF ADDITIONAL 
FEDERAL APPROPRIATIONS - 

During the past three years, we have received $115,245 additional appropri- 
ations from federal sources for the support of Extension work at the University 
of Massachusetts. These funds have been used to strengthen educational programs 
of the University among the people of the Commonwealth on the following specific 
problems. 

1. To Extend Services in Agriculture and Home Economics to a Larger Segment of 
the Population in Massachusetts . 

Programs in Home Economics, Home Horticulture and 4-H Youth have 
application to a high percentage of Massachusetts families which have 
not been reached in the past. A new program in Family Economics presents 
the business knowledge needed by the average homemaker in handling credit 
problems, such as installment buying, mortgages, etc., along with 
insurance, savings and large purchases. Programs in Home Horticulture 
developed rapidly. Home Economics is serving a few industrial groups 
and is giving large numbers of consumers information in wise selection 
of foods and fabrics. Suburban 4-H Clubs are being organized. 

2. Agricultural Marketing . 

Marketing, and distribution of agricultural products, is regarded as 
being one of the great problems of agriculture and of consumers. These 
problems involve producers, handlers, processors, wholesalers and consumers. 
Some federal funds are specifically earmarked for this purpose. Additional 
funds are being used to hire a staff to carry on marketing education 
activities and to reach the various groups concerned. 

3. Farm and Family Business Management . 

Managing a farm involves highly complicated business decisions. Farm 
family financial problems are closely related to the farm itself. Educational 
programs designed to help the members of a farm family to make wise business 
decisions have been strengthened. So far, education of this character has 
demanded work with small groups and with individual families. 

4. Understanding Public Policies . 

Off -farm situations and government programs are increasingly important 
to the welfare of the individual. Increasing emphasis has been given to 
educational programs in order that the people concerned may better understand 
these influences and policies. 

Of the additional federal appropriations which have become available since 
1953, $59,384 have been allocated directly to County Extension Services. These 
County Extension Services have established 12 new positions with these funds. 
Certain supporting services, such as travel, supplies and equipment, have also 
been provided to the counties concerned. Ten new positions in the Extension 
Service of the University of Massachusetts have been established in order to give 
leadership to the programs just discussed. 



" 2 •'''"■' 

Further proposals that will make programs of the University available to 
the citizens of the Commonwealth are as follows: 

1. A position of Home Demonstration Agent-at-Large be established to 
work with families in Boston and Suffolk County. 

4 ' 

2. A position of Food Engineer be established to work in the field of 
Agricultural Marketing. >/.r. f 

3. Two instructorships -- one in Marketing and one in Agricultural 
Economics. 

4. A Senior Clerk and Stenographer position to give secretarial support 
to the positions requested above. 



EXPANDED AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH _ PROGRAM 1956-1957 
Dale H. Sieling, Director 



Number Department 



Title 



Amount 



*1. 

2. 
*3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

*7. 



*8. 

*9. 

10. 
*11. 

*12. 



*13. 



14. 

15. 
16. 



Agr. Econ. 



Profitability of Irrigation on Representative 
Farms. NE-33 ECON. OF IRRIGATION 



Agr, Eng. Mechanization of the Cranberry Industry. 

Entomology Pesticide Residues on or in Agricultural 

Products. NE-36 PESTICIDE RESIDUES 



Entomology 



Forestry 



Forestry 



Use of Insecticides to Prevent Borer Damage 
to Unseasoned Logs. 

Influence of Soil Conditions on Growth of 
Forest Stands. Part 1 • Red Pine 

Animal Damage to Agricultural Crops in 
Massachusetts. 



Olericulture The Relation of Some Environmental Factors 

and Chloro IPC Applications to the Growth of 
Onions. NE-12 WEED CONTROL 

Olericulture Breeding Quality Sweet Corn for the Early 
Market. NE-32 SWEET CORN BREEDING 



$3,800. 
8,512. 

4,000. 

1,200. 

3,600. 

2,6^0. 

2,900. 
3,000. 



Shade Tree The Nature and Development of Tree Wilt Diseases. 

NE-25 FOREST DISEASES 3,500. 



Vet Science Pullorum Disease Studies 

Cranberry Climatology and Northeastern Agriculture, 
NE-35 CLIMATOLOGY 



Agr. Econ. 



Food Tech. 



Marketing Costs Associated with Curtailment or 
Expansion in Consumer Services. NEM-17 
CONSUMER SERVICES 



3,120. 
2,100. 

8,750. 



The Effect of Handling, Processing and Chemical 
Treatment on the Shelf Life and Quality of Fresh 
Vegetables. NEM-18. MARKETING FRESH & PROCESSED 
VEGETABLES. 5,400. 



Cranberry 



The Value of Refrigeration in Marketing Fresh 
Cranberries. 



Vet Science Infectious Synovitis in Chickens and Turkeys. 

Dairy & An. Effect of Processing on the Characteristics of 
Science the Dairy Product 'Half and Half 1 . 



900. 
4,770. 

3,260. 



$61,432. 



^Regional Projects. 



1 



! 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 


2L17 


OMMITTEE 


January 10, 1957, 11:00 a.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Boyden, Bartlett, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, Desmond, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke 

Upon the recommendation of the President and the Uni- 
versity Committee on Course of Study, it was 






VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following new undergraduate courses: 


New 
Courses 


1 


CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 83 Survey of Nuclear Engineering. 
An introduction to the principles of nuclear physics 
and a survey of problems involved in the design and 
operation of nuclear reactors. Among the topics to 
be considered are heat transfer, shielding, metallurgy, 
controls, waste disposal and health physics. 
3 class hours Credit 3 
Prerequisites, Chemistry 1, 2; Physics 25, 
26; Mathematics 29, 30 or equivalent, and 
permission of the instructor. 






CIVIL ENGINEERING 63 (I) Testing of Materials. A 

laboratory course for Mechanical Engineering students 
which includes some of the more advanced aspects of 
materials testing. Such topics as torsion testing, 
the strain gage rosette, photo-elasticity, and dynamic 
testing are covered. 

1 3-hour laboratory Credit 1 
Prerequisite, Civil Engineering 51 or 53 






Upon the recommendation of the President and the 






Graduate School Council, it was 






VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following new graduate courses: 






EDUCATION 201 Field Studies in Education. Practice in 
the application of educational theory and technique 
in the public schools in such fields as supervision, 
administration and audio-visual organization. The stu- 
dent will prepare a comprehensive written report of 
his practice, experience and problems. A student 





2118 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



cannot offer both Education 200 and 201 for the 
Master's Degree. 

Prerequisite, Education 291, and Education Credit 4 
85 or one year's teaching experience. The Staff 

EDUCATION 257 Children's Literature. A study of the 

basic types and foremost works in the literature for 
children. Attention given to different interest and 
vocabulary levels and to the criteria for selection 
of lists for individual children. 

Prerequisite, Education 161 Credit 2-3 

Mrs. Trumbull 

EDUCATION 258 Implementing the Elementary School Program. 
An advanced course in curriculum design and classroom 
organization. It includes practices in planning, 
presenting, and evaluating programs involving integra- 
tion of skills and activities for the various grade 
levels. 

Prerequisite, Education 160, and teaching Credit 2-3 
experience. Miss O'Leary 

EDUCATION 268 Administration of Audio-Visual Services. 
An advanced course designed to prepare audio-visual 
coordinators, directors and supervisors in the 
operation of an audio-visual service. Problems to 
be discussed include: teacher training, selection of 
materials and equipment, storage, cataloging, distri- 
bution, maintenance and financial support. 
Prerequisite, Education 166 Credit 2-3 

Mr . Wyman 

EDUCATION 284 The Junior High School. The history of the 
Junior High School movement; the philosophy, aims and 
functions of a junior high school. Consideration 
will be given to the instructional program, including 
methods of instruction, the role of the basic skills, 
guidance, organization, extra curricular activities, 
and an examination and evaluation of current trends 
in Junior High School education. 

Prerequisites, Education 164 or 183 Credit 2-3 

Mr. Fennel 1 

PSYCHOLOGY 246 Diagnosis and Treatment of Behavior 

Disorders in Children. The diagnosis and treatment 
of psychological maladjustments in infancy and child- 
hood. A survey of treatment procedures, resources, 
and methods used in dealing with behavior and per- 
sonality problems. Lectures, discussion and case 
demons t rat ions . 

Prerequisites, Psychology 182, 183, or 235, Credit 3 
194 or 242, 252 and 253. 



DMM1TTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Upon the recommendation of the President and the Uni- 
versity Committee on Sabbatical Leaves, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 

sabbatical leaves for John S. Bailey and 
Frederick E. Cole as follows: 

John S. Bailey, Associate Professor of Pomology, for 
six months at full pay for the period April 1 through 
September 30, 1957 for the purpose of studying the 
small fruit industry on the west coast. Professor 
Bailey plans to make his headquarters at the Univer- 
sity of California School of Agriculture at Davis, 
California. 

Frederick E. Cole, Extension Professor of Marketing, 
for six months at full pay for the period August 1, 
1957 through January 31, 1958 for the purpose of 
studying new developments in marketing of agricultural 
products. Professor Cole expects to study marketing 
activities in at least 20 states. 

President Mather reviewed the qualifications of Joseph 
D. Burroughs whose appointment to the grade of Professor has been 
recommended by Dean Sieling of the College of Agriculture. The 
President said that Mr. Burroughs is currently receiving a salary 
of $8,200 at Cornell University and for this reason it will be 
necessary to employ him ahove the minimum. In making this 
recommendation, it is understood that Mr. Burroughs will be assigned 
to the staff of the College of Agriculture and the source of funds 
will be Extension Service. After discussion of the proposed pro- 
gram for Mr. Burroughs and of his qualifications, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees appoint 

Joseph D. Burroughs as Extension Professor 
"A" in Human Relations effective February 1, 
1957 at beginning salary of $8,372 which is 
two steps above the minimum for the grade. 

The committee discussed the qualifications of John H. 
Dittfach who is recommended by the Dean of Engineering for promo- 
tion from Associate Professor to Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing. After discussion and on the recommendation of the President, 



2119 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



John S. 
Bailey 



Frederick E. 
Cole 



Joseph D. 
Burroughs 



John H. 
Dittfach 



2L20 



COMMITTEE 



Theodore C. 
Caldwell 



Harold W. 
Cary 



Milo 
Kimball 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



it was 

VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees promote John 
H. Dittfach from Associate Professor to 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering effective 
February 1, 1957 at annual salary of $7,748. 

President Mather said that Professors Cary and Caldwell 

of the History Department have taken turns in the position of Head 

of Department of History and after a three-year period with 

Professor Cary as Head, they would like to reverse their positions 

for a time. Accordingly, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
promotion of Theodore C. Caldwell from Pro- 
fessor to Head of the Department of History 
effective November 1, 1956 at annual salary 
of $8,680 subject to upward revision under 
the Attorney General ruling relative to 
application of the Barrington Report to 
salary schedules. 

The Committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve Pro- 
fessor Cary's request to be changed from 
Head of Department to Professor of History 
effective November 1, 1956 at annual salary 
of $8,684. 

On the recommendation of President Mather and after 

discussion, the committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
request of Milo Kimball to be shifted from 
the position of Dean of the School of Business 
Administration to Professor of Business Ad- 
ministration effective March 1, 1957. It is 
understood that Mr. Kimball's salary as Dean 
will continue through the month of February 
and that he will be paid as Professor at 
annual rate of > $8,372 beginning March 1, 1957. 

President Mather presented memorandum from Dean Sieling 
of the School of Agriculture in which he recommends the establish- 
ment of several new positions in the Extension Service from newly 
available Federal Funds. After discussion, the committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 

establishment of the following new positions 
with the understanding that all salaries 
through the fourth step shall be paid from 
Federal Funds : 

1 Professor "A" in the field of Food Engineering, 
Extension 

1 Assistant Professor "A" in Home Economics, Ex- 
tension, in and around Boston 

2 Instructors "A" in Farm Management Agricultural 
Economics and Marketing programs 

1 Senior Clerk and Stenographer to serve the above 
program. 

President Mather said that the Army ROTC and Air Force 
ROTC have recently made available flight instruction training 
programs on a volunteer basis for those students in the programs 
who desire this additional training. The President said that he 
would like to have flight training programs available for Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts students and that the cost for the train- 
ing will be borne by the Army and Air Force. After discussion, 



it was 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Trustees authorize the 
University to negotiate contracts with the 
Army and Air Force for flight training on a 
voluntary basis for ROTC and AFROTC students 
who qualify for and desire such training; 
also to authorize the University to negotiate 
a sub-contract or sub-contracts with CAA 
approved flying schools to provide this 
training. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 o'clock. 



~7^ 




^C 



Y^^C^^ ^C : 



Secretary 



2121 



New 

Positions in 
Extension 
Service 



Army Air 
Force 



2L22 



COMMITTEE 



Master 
Plan 



Dormitory 

#15 



Liberal Arts 
Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROI^NDS 

March 19, 1957, 6:00 p.m., Hotel Statler, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Brett, Haigis, McDermott, 
Whitmore, President Mather, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary Burke, 
Architects Larsen, Ross, Shurcliffe 

At the request of Chairman Whitmore, Mr. Shurcliffe re- 
viewed refinements and changes in the Master Plan of the University 
These changes have grown out of previous consultations with the 
Trustees and members of the faculty and administration. After 
review, the committee 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the Master Plan of the campus as modified 
by Mr. Shurcliffe as of March 18, 1957. 

The committee discussed the location of dormitory #15 

and after review with the architects 

VOT ED: To recommend that the Trustees approve 

the location of dormitory #15 in the area 
behind Fernald Hall and at the foot of the 
hill in front of Mills and Brooks dormi- 
tories as shown on the revised Master Plan. 

With the assistance and advice of the architects, the 

committee reviewed architects' plans for several new buildings 

and 



VOTED : 1 . 



2. 



To request Mr. Louis W. Ross to rework 
plans for dormitory #15 and to bring 
them back to the committee at a later 
dite. 

To recommend that the Trustees approve 
final plans for the Liberal Arts Build- 
ing as prepared by Shep ley Bui finch 
Richardson and Abbott. 



I 



rOMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. To recommend that the Trustees approve 
final plans for the Library addition as 
prepared by Ames and Graves. 

4. To recommend that the Trustees approve 
preliminary plans for the Maintenance 
Building as prepared by Maloney and 
Tessier. 

5. To accept as a preliminary study the 
plans for the School of Education Build- 
ing as prepared by James A. Brit ton. 

6. To give tentative approval to plans for 
the Vegetable Gardening Building as pre- 
pared by Albert M. Kreider, subject to 
further negotiations between Treasurer 
Johnson, Hall Nichols of the Division of 
Building Construction and the architect. 

7. To approve plans for a monument to hold 
the Phi Sigma Kappa tablet as prepared 
by Leland Larsen Bradley and Hibbard. 

Treasurer Johnson said that the structure to hold the tablet may 

be erected by the National Society of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 

Treasurer Johnson discussed the need for preparing plans 

for a parking lot and other improvements in the vicinity of the 

Student Union Building and the Physics Building. The roads in this 

area need curbing, part of the brook has to be covered and the 

parking lot has to be laid out. After discussion, it was 

VOTED: To recommend that the Trustees appoint the 

firm of Whitman and Howard of Boston as con- 
sultants to prepare plans and specifications 
for parking lot and other improvements in 
the vicinity of the Student Union Building 
and the Physics Building. 

The committee considered the University's capital outlay 

program for the next five year*? and on recommendation of the 

President 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
capital outlay projects for the fiscal 
year 1959 in accordance with the attached 
list. 



/O I 6j<J 



Goodell 
Library 
addition 

Maintenance 
Building 



School of 
Education 
Building 

Vegetable 
Gardening 
Building 



] Phi Sigma 
Kappa 
' tablet 



Parking 

Area 



Capital 
Outlay 



2124 



COMMITTEE 



Liberal 

Arts 

Building 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the administration to submit capital out- 
lay projects for fiscal 1960, 1961, 1962 
and 1963 in a total amount of $28,065,000 
with the understanding that the Trustees 
reverse the right to alter and amend 
these projects from year to year. 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson said that the con- 
struction of the Liberal Arts building may be delayed because o f 
inability to obtain 20-inch steam pipes. The present steam lines 
will have to be relocated before this Liberal Arts Building is 
built and 20- inch pipe is in very short supply. The committee 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to convey to 

the Division of Building Construction the 
need for speedy action on this project and 
to urge that means be found for taking care 
of this steam line problem as rapidly as 
possible. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



March 13, 1957 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM 
For the Fiscal Years 1959 - 1963 



1959 



1. Science Center - Third Section, including 

furnishings and equipment and working 
drawings for fourth section 

2. Infirmary, including furnishings and equipment 

3. Engineering & Physics Shops, including 

furnishings and equipment 

4. Cold Storage Laboratory, including equipment 

5. Addition to Dining Commons, including 

furnishings and equipment 

6. Physical Education Building for Men, 

including furnishings, equipment and 
site improvements 

7. Plans for Natural Resources Building 

8. Poultry Plant Laboratories & Buildings 



Total 



$1 


,500 


,000 


1 


,040 


,000 




800 


,000 




375 


,000 




360 


,000 


2 


,500 


000 




55 


,000 




250 


000 


$6 


,880, 


000 



Si " 



>v.: .r 






■&:. 



, •■ • : ;■■■■-. .; 



t'j -. : 'Y.. :-'■' ' 



k- - '-::-':''':' . : ' ■:'■' ■ ■■'• 






'■ 



•{ 



' 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 2 
1960 

1. Science Center, including furnishings & equipment $1,500,000 

2. Natural Resources Building, including furnishings, equip- 1,000,000 

ment and site improvements 

3. Addition to Power Plant, including boiler, and utility 750,000 

distribution systems and facilities 

4. Plans for Addition to Food Technology Building 50,000 

5. Plans for Addition to Physics Building 100,000 

6. Classrooms and Offices, School of Business Administration, 1,200,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

7. Plans for Animal Science Building 100,000 

8. Plans for Engineering Building 75,000 

9. Service Building for Experiment Station 100,000 

10. Plans for Administration Building 75,000 

11. Building for Experiment Station - East Wareham, 200,000 

including furnishings and equipment 

12. Renovate Laboratories - Flint Building, including equipment 40,000 

13. Physical Education Fields, including drainage, grading, 200,000 

and seeding 

14. Warehouse and Garage for Plant 200,000 



Total $5,590,000 
1961 

1. Addition to Food Technology Building, including $ 900,000 

furnishings and equipment 

2. Addition to Physics Building, including furnishings 2,000,000 

and equipment 

3. Animal Science Building, including furnishings & equipment 2,000,000 

4. Engineering Building, including furnishings and equipment 1,500,000 

5. Administration Building, including furnishings & equipment 1,500,000 

6. Plans for Assembly Hall and Field House 100,000 



Total $8,000,000 



CAPITAL OUTLAY PROGRAM - Page 3 

1962 

1. Assembly Hall and Field House, including $3,000,000 

furnishings, equipment, and site 
development 

2. Plant Science Building, including greenhouses, 1,650,000 

furnishings, equipment, and site development 

3. Addition to Utility Distribution System 500,000 

4. Coal Storage Facilities, including railsiding, 500,000 

equipment and equipment building 

5. Plans for Dining Commons 75,000 

6. Classroom Building, including furnishings and 1,000,000 

equipment 

7. Plans for Farm Buildings 100,000 

8. Plans for Auditorium 150,000 



Total $6,975,000 

1963 

1. Dining Commons, including furnishings and $1,500,000 

equipment 

2. Farm Buildings Replacements 3,000,000 

3. Auditorium - Music, TV, Radio, Drama and Art Center 3,000,000 



Total $7,500,000 



TOTAL -- FIVE-YEAR PROGRAM $34,945,000 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

April 16, 1957, 1:00 p.m., Office of Dr. Bartlett, Boston, Mass. 

Chairman Brett presiding 

PRESENT: Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Taber, President Mather, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary Burke 

The committee reviewed the report of the Auditor for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1956, and considered also Treasurer 
Johnson's comments relative to the suggestions made by the Auditor. 
(See attached statement) 

Treasurer Johnson said that much of the criticism of the. 
Auditor could be met by the addition of certain new positions in 
the Treasurer's Office. These positions were approved by the 
Trustees last November but have not yet been cleared by the State. 

The committee reviewed operations of the Student Union 

Building and the amount of income accruing f-*-Om operations. It was 

VOTED t To recommend that the Trustees bond the 

Director of the Student Urion in the amount 
of $10,000 beyond the general coverage for 
University employees. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the Trustees are now . 

carrying an additional $10,000 bond on the Business Manager of the 

University who has access to very little if any cash, and it was 

VOTED : To discontinue the extra $10,000 bond for 

the Business Manager at the termination of the 
present bonding period. 

Treasurer Johnson reported that the University has re- 
ceived $700 as a gift from the General Electric Corporation for un- 
restricted purposes. After discussion, the committee 



& 1 4jO 



Auditor's 
Report 



Student Union 
Director - 
bonded 



Business 
Manager 



General 

Electric 

Fund 



2L26 



COMMITTEE 



Helen E. 
Knowlton 
Endowment Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the President to expend $700 from the 
General Electric Company gift for un- 
restricted purposes. 

Some months ago the Trustees accepted a bequest of 
$15,000 from the estate of Clarence Hinkley Knowlton. The bequest 
is to be used for the establishment of a scholarship fund for de- 
serving women students in Home Economics and is to be in memory of 
Miss Helen E. Knowlton. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to establish the Helen E. 
Knowlton endowment fund with the income 
to be used for a scholarship or scholar- 
ships to deserving women students in Home 
Economics, with the understanding that 
the principal is to be invested as part 
of the pooled endowment funds of the Uni- 
versity. 

The committee reviewed the invested endowment funds of 

the University and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to sell $15,000 
worth of U.S. Treasury notes 2's due 
8/15/57 and to buy $15,000 worth of 
Treasury bonds, 3%'s. 

The committee considered the percentage of the total in- 
vestment in bonds versus the percentage in common stocks. It was 
generally agreed that a 50% investment in common stocks is a de- 
sirable goal and to attain this the amount held in savings bonds 
should be gradually reduced and reinvested. Interest falls due in 
July for part of the savings bank investments and in August for 
another part. It was agreed to wait for the interest periods be- 
fore reinvesting these funds. 



i 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



&> i ~~> i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Treasurer Johnson reported that he now has $17,000 in 
cash for investment. Committee member? offered various 
suggestions, especially in the field of public utilities and re- 
quested the Treasurer to study this matter further and recommend 
a definite investment for the $17,000. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4 o'clock. 




Secretary 



2128 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



tmiVEJiSm OF MASSACESSBITS 
MEKORA*DUH 

From: Treasurer ates April 16, 1957 

To; Board of Trustees 

Subject; State Auditor's Report fos the period of August 15, 1955 to 

September 4„ 1956 

Internal Control - Since the Auditor ia using generalised languag- es tfe 
pression that there is s l&ek of effective internal control and that the accounting 
system is aot up-to-date, it seams advisable to list the isajor changes sad iis&rov*- 
stents that h&ve. been ijastailed since January 1, 1952 s 

L Ke%? systea of budgetary control 

2. Installation of UK punch-card system for? 

payroll including 

payroll preparation 

siting cheeks 

bask reconciliation 

fund analysis 

Comptroller's nonthly cosposite payroll 

employe? ^jreniags records 

withholding tax records and £-2 forms 

cosputr: of rates, etc, 

budgetary coatrol - ail state funiis with veekly 
expenditure aa$ status reports to all School 

£*bs, etc, - Daily reports ia Treasurer's Office, 

student bill lag including 

prep&ratioo and writing of bills 

record of payments 

potential income control 

analysis of r®ceig>ts 

fund distribution of recaip' 

budget preparation - compilation £&& analysis of 

budget requests of schools, etc 

3. Establishment of internal controls through sep on 

o£ functions ef cash receipts and d -assents with 
duties of verification of transaction* s : T 
separate individuals in separate sections of the office. 

4 Collate change of all functions of teller and cashier 
to establish internal control, 

5. Hestriftted control of tbe vault with teller not having 
combination. Vault coabinettou ehaagod frequently . 

6c i?ollce protect ioa during busy periods such as 
registration . 

7o Frequent internal cash audits. 



To? So&rd of Trustees -2- ■ April 18, 1957 



reasad bond for all employees of University faros 

$10,000 to §20, COO o The Treasurer -and Business 
anager b&w& additional bands of $10,000 sock. 

f o Complete new system of &tndast activities accounts 
under Recognised Studeut, Organisations ^ifch 
eoctzol account* ®ad funds in Treasurer 8 * Officio 

10, Installation of Taller'® €aah Control Machine 

pre eked* in madlfc control and automatic 
▼a] ion of all vouchors « 

11.-. /stem of endcsssaest fund accounting. 






Collate new system ©f research fund accounting and 

control » 

accounting system for University Store. 

14 o Kigid requirements for proper signatures on all 
voucte-e by sutherlsad personnel. 

15. Sys of control of traffic fin®**,, 

"it m obvious that these accomplishments have established a modern system 

of int L soafcrela These may need to be further extended to cover seme of the 
apecifio point a covered in the Auditor* n Report but on the whole the University 
now has an excellent system staffed with loyal* mail-qualified personnel. 

The major problem .preventing the accomplishing of the details remaining t© 

complete the system of internal control that has been developed over the last 
five years is el ik of certain key positions, these have keen budgeted each 
year but have not been ided« Last Hovamber the Trustees took action 
authorising the establishment of the position of Comptroller with a realignment 
of duties within the Treasurer's Office c To date this position has not been 
established i c i.& hope that it will he approved in fchiar. yearns 

appropriation bill. It Is also anticipated that a position of semi- senior 

intent j head clerk, and receiving teller will be approved this year.. These 
positions wi!2 plete the staffing and organisation that are laacesaary to 
complete the system of latere atroi in the area® mentioned below. It 
should be noted that, zbx&v from four positions in the IBM Section that also 
serve the Regis :sitio«s have been added tn the Treasurer 9 * Office 

in the last si >»ra in spite, of a tremendous increase in the volume of work 
in all axeas. 

i\ Effective immediately there is being established a new position of semi'* 
senior accountant t& be paid from the General Iliac trie? Trust that will perform 
the pre~audl£ and certifying functions essential to control of trust fund 
expenditures « The need this position has been reported periodically to 



Hoard of Trustees ~3« April 16 1957 



the Trustees. It U fortunate that it , can Is© established without state tods. 

'^S£^LIS£2rdfi - Separate cash books a©d general ledger®, for <sa©h fund 
group* .are justified when acre than one person 1© required to use any of these 
books at the same tine.. This situation do®a not prevail at this time. In 
essence w® presently toe separate general ledgers, fey fund groups, bat s*ae® 
only on© mploj®® is required to use these records they are contained in cue 



?W- .; M.Sffc. ^> 



spar at© cash books will not @a#e our ssonth-ead analysis problem to any 
appreciable decree.. This problem will be resolved whan expenditures of Trust 

ai£3 Federal funds are recorded on I B„Mo cards • 

This recommendation is primarily desigaed to make it easier for the 
Auditor . accordingly, the ledgers , feeing post-binder anyway, will be separated 
as reco® ?;d for bis us®. 

££§£l2LJt^ - As soon as personnel is available, all of these 

racorus should be centralised in tha Treasurer ° s Office with the various 
Control -Services office originating the charges on salas slip© or other 
vouchers. The only reason this has not bMB deua is that there is a substantial 
additional workload that cannot be added without the positions to handle it, 
m±s h&* been an annul cossaent of the auditors, the TrM«urer has no control 
ovar the records maintained outside his office mnd therefore, the Auditor 5 ® 
rece«aeud®tioa is act practical . 






1SSSLI^SLI^S^*SS^S& .- Corrected as noted abova under internal Control, 



Trust Ftend Account! 



1. Athletic Activities - The Director of Athletics has taken 

action to comply with the control of vending machine 
income and budgetary control, Looae-leaf ledger sheets 
in post-binders will be continued to facilitate posting 

by machine rather Khan by head» 

2. Recognised Student Organisations - The Auditor was mls- 

in sd since the reports ©re distributed,, 

3* Summer School Recreation Fund - All receipts? ©nd disburse- 
ments from this fund me through the Treasurer's Office 
iKhera complete records are maintained. Since the 
administrator of this fund changes practically every 
year and has the fond for only mix to eight weeks , it 
is not practical for him to keep records. 

4o Women© * Jtoruitory Social Bund - By action of tha Trustees 
this fund was transferred to ESO last Kovember. 



] 



I 



i 



To: Board of Trustee© -4- April 16, 1957 



Studsnt Union Accounting - The centralized accounting recommended was established 
fro® the opening of the Union according; to our pl^n. 

Cash Receipts - State Account© • Although it is highly desirable in principle as 
an internal control. measure that .all University mail b® opened at one central 
pci^fc of initial receipt, end all monies received be listed and such listing fee 
given to someone other than the cashier for ii&depecdent verification, there are 
considerations (stall for students and alumni office-, delivery points® to many 
physically sc *ed buildings., e as well a© the requirements for additional 
personnel, that make this recc ioa impracticable. Bowever*. ail monies 
received in the stall by this office (except during peak loads at registration • 
at which time 1 fee impracticable) are listed and subsequently verified, 
by soss&one otlmr than the cashier 

feetiva £n /'"arch all sac i now initially received fey the Control Service 
departments (although practically all in the form of cheeks) are received 
directly hy the Treasurer's Office. To ttmlmrnnt this change in procedure , 
invoices for these charges &r*s submitted in duplicate to the recipients of -these 
services, with instructions thereon for payments to be made directly to this 
office accompanied by one* copy of this Invoice as a remittance advice. This 
docwEaat will serve to identify the transaction for this office and wasso receipted 
and forwar :o the appropriate department will serve -as an advice of payment for 
the Control Service departroa&te . 

Cashier's Sauipcfient - Two tellers are active only during rush periods. Since we 
have not bad funds to purchase a second cash-control machine „ it has been our 

practice, to have the day's transactions of the second teller validated by machine 

at the end of the day. 

Another machine will be purchased as soon as possible. 

A bookkeeping machine for posting student deposits by the teller has the 
undesirable feature of having one person receive and post transactions. This is 
divided between two persons at present for good internal control with the one 
poet lug to permanent student deposit record cards using a bookkeeping machine. 

5°.^^i!ULl3li. " & n&p ©anager has been appointed. The Business Manager is 
correcting these 1 tarns with hlsu 

Operation of Plant - Ee atala * The Housing Office is continuing the maintenance 
of a "Quarters* Register" for each dwelling unit, which is the authorized record 
required to b& maintained by- the State Controller . I believe that the proper 
tpalctenonce *>£ the "Quarters* Register" and the existing accounting Records of 
this office provide adequate internal control, and a means for the auditor 
to verify rental receipts against the potential incotae. The few errors referred 
to by the / i sport were human errors resulting primarily from our transition 
from a monthly to a weekly payroll deduction procedure. To maintain the "tenants* 
ledger" recommended by the auditor, would result in a duplication of records. 



8< - sf Trustee© 



[95? 



tU4 « *®s* sm^tinn «* i» «y system 
*]**•, teigs**d by fc*ra CM-^ »fao hav* ratal* •„- 

8 true that- thm xefcail £^«je sadifcoj* 

t* Ju«t a« feaalbla to d . :fe th* praeet fcto w £r 



l||ll^ T li£Ml2a^aiI - £* ..-.-i y * jai dealt., obtain -v pi 



see 



■*«^ : » pramabwiag la beteg tea by the A. w^ 

BHtelOC- of th font, fc< :fe / £ | ™ 

<^t bas been notified* ~ Btepa*^ 




,||£tei^E^|£ - MoBfAIy prodnctioa reports ara no* bei^ 
stations at walthaa a&d Helenas.,, 

I b«li®^^ s however, tb tadasseat&l concept &i 

capiat, accouatabiltty of product, priced pri«rily fe ' ^f *L 

^mM^^lm^LImiiB. - 4~E Aetlvitlaa fed la ..,, lfi€d m m M 

■iMI^SHMiSi^jHMiilii - • zh® satbod w®^ to J «« these buHdin«« um 

established by las* (Chants **& A~f* n.a t»'*e\ —* sings v*as 

.*<&<. W(3 t , ^is, \v.«nfcj*K.fij£ .*&i,>. ^^i,® 4>i A»'3y^ ^a© each ads fori* 1 4 ,-. 

%*°«gd by the Ce^al Coerf i„ ^w 1 LStog "c" 

numou,. appMr. to be i elaH of: efe8 u,. lttlM1 ; ;coeral Court 

bSS^lJL*^" optci ?^»' ^ TTeeewet. this a «dic M the km ^-oegh md 

t.u8ine*»-.like ol say witkin the last Jive yeses.. It reveeted , «.i«r 

ioael po.tMoM,lt«*, r« 5 «*«d the** it«. CSB be effectively commUm. 
t» ' then bg 3 beets to seet ta fctuM. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND PROGRAM OF STUDY 

May 2, 1957, 10:00 a.m., Colonial Lounge, Student Union Building 

Chairman Boyden presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Boyden, Miss Buxton, 
Crowley, President Mather; Provost 
McCune, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 



The committee considered sabbatical leaves as 

recommended by the faculty committee on sabbatical leaves and 

discussed each recommended leave with President Mather and Provost 

McCune, and it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following sabbatical leaves: 

1. Edwin D. Driver , Assistant Professor of Sociology, 
for one year at half pay for study in India of 
social and cultural factors in mental illness. 

2. G_. St anley Koehler , Associate Professor of English, 

for the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, for 
research involving study of the relation between 
imagery and myth in the poetry of Milton at Widener 
Library. 

3- Robert P. Lane , Associate Professor of English, for 
the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, for re- 
search and writing on the subject of Gabriel Harvey. 

4. William B. Nutting , Assistant Professor of Zoology, 
for the second semester 1957-58 at full salary, to 
study demodectic mange in Australia. 

5. Israel H. Rose , Associate Professor of Mathematics, 
for the first semester 1957-58 at full salary, for 
research in abstract Algebra and the foundations of 
Geometrv. 

6. Jonas Vengris , Assistant Research Professor of 
Agronomy, for the period July 1 to December 31, 1957 
at full salary, for basic research in weed control 
at the University of Wisconsin 



2129 



Sabbatical 
Leaves 



Edwin D. 
Driver 



G. Stanley 
Koehler 



Robert P. 
Lane 



William B, 
Nutting 



Israel H. 
Rose 



Jonas Vengris 



2130 



COMMITTEE 



New 
Courses 



Forestry 
Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee next considered changes in the under- 
graduatp program of study as recommended by the Faculty Committee 
on Course of Study. Provost McCune explained that each course 
emanates in a department of the University. It must receive de- 
partmental approval, then approval by the school committee on cours 
of study. The next step is approval by the University Committee 
on Course of Study and finally it is passed on by the Provost and 
President before it is brought to the Trustees. After discussion, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
following new courses of study, changes in 
course credit or content and summer institute 
courses. 

Dr, Boyden led discussion on the proposed graduate pro- 
gram in Forestry leading to the master's degree. This program 
originated in the Department of Forestry and has had approval of 
the Graduate School Council of the University. He complimented 
those in charge of the work and of the preparation of the material 
accompanying the recommendation. After discussion, it was 

VO TE D : To recommend that the Trustees approve the 
graduate program in Forestry as outlined in 
the attached memorandum dated February 4, 1957 
and also approve the new graduate courses as 
listed on page 15 of this same memorandum. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m. 




Secretary 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

May 31, 1957, 3:00 p.m., President's Office, U of M 



PRESENT: Trustees Brett, Haigis, Whitmore, 

President Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

Treasurer Johnson reported that a new state highway is 
to be constructed near the Wareham Cranberry Station. Very little 
land taking is involved. However, during his inspection of the 
property, he learned that no survey of the station is in existence. 
He also noted that the road which leads into the station and which 
is on property owned by the University is being used by a private 
property owner to reach his home. Apparently this man has been 
allowed to use the road for some time. He is now planning to 
establish a housing development which could mean that the station 
road would be used by all the new home owners. Inasmuch as the 
road is on University owned land and goes between the only two 
buildings on the Cranberry Scat ion property, it was the feeling of 
the committee that steps should be taken to prevent this from be- 
coming a public way. Accordingly, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to seek means of preventing 
the Cranberry Station road from becoming 
a public way. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to employ Walter E. Rowley, 
Civil Engineer of West Wareham, to make 
a complete survey of the University land 
at Wareham at cost not to exceed $500. 



2131 



Cranberry 
Station 



2132 



COMMITTEE 



Appraisers 



Fraternities 

and 
Sororities 



Thayer 
Building 



Student Union 
Building 



Van Meter 
Dormitory 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee inspected proposed plans for construction 

of a shop and greenhouse at the Cranberry Station and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees approve 
the erection of a shop and greenhouse 
with Federal Funds at the Cranberry 
Station at an estimated cost of $19,000 
in accordance with sketches presented to 
the committee. 

The committee discussed ways and means of appraising the 

University land which is to be offered for sale to fraternities 

and sororities and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to employ the following 
persons to appraise the properties: 

B. 0. Moody, Vice President, First National 
Bank of Amherst 
Robert D. Hawley, Selectman of Amherst 
John Foot it, Insurance Agent of Amherst 

The committee also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees authorize 
the Treasurer to have the proposed 
fraternity and sorority lots surveyed. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees name the 
large animal building constructed with 
funds given by Red Acre Farms, Inc. - the 
Thayer Building - in accordance with the 
wishes of the donor. 

The committee inspected recently-completed building 

projects throughout the campus and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Trustees accept the 
following projects as completed: 

1. The Student Union Building built by the 
University of Massachusetts Building 
Association. 

2. The addition to Van Meter Dormitory 
(dormitory #14) built by the University 
of Massachusetts Building Association. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. The Finish Grading & Seeding of Machmer 
Hall (Mass, State Project No. U-701, 
contract #2) as completed by Osley Con- 
struction Company on May 8, 1957. 

4. Renovations to Flint Laboratory (Mass. 
State Project No. U-502, contract #5) 
as completed by M. Solimando on May 22, 
1957, subject to approval by the Treasurer 
of minor corrections in the work. 

5. Renovation to Wilder Hall (Mass. State 
Project No. U-402, contract #4) as com- 
pleted by D. A. Sullivan and Sons on 
May 15, 1957. 

6. The Thayer Building (large animal build- 
ing) as completed by D, A. Sullivan and 
Sons on May 17, 1957. 

7. Service Transformers (Mass. State 
Project No. U-702, contract #3) by the 
Collins Electric Company on February 5, 
1957. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:45 p.m. 




Secretary 



2133 



Machmer 
Hall 



Flint 
Laboratory 



Wilder 
Hall 



Thayer 
Building 



Service 
Transformers 



2L34 



COMMITTEE 



Dormitory 

#15 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
building 



ROTC 
building 



Rally Area 



Student Union 
building 



Metawampe 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS 

AND GROUNDS 

August 13, 1957, 1:30 p.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Whitmore presiding 

PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Haigis, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary Burke 

The committee examined revised plans for dormitory #15 

as prepared by Louis W. Ross , architect , and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve the plans as presented. 

The committee examined plans for the Vegetable Gardening 

building and greenhouse as prepared by Albert M. Kreider and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve the plans as presented. 

Treasurer Johnson showed preliminary plans of the ROTC 

building as prepared by Clinton Foster Goodwin. The committee had 

earlier examined floor plans of this building and asked for a 

rendition showing the exterior of the building as it would be seen 

from the road behind South College. After examination, the 

committee 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve the plans as presented. 

The committee then reviewed plans for the rally area near 

the Student Union building. The purpose of this area is to provide 

a sloping outdoor place for students to stage meetings and rallies. 

Incorporated in the plans as prepared by Whitman & Howard, Inc. is 

the statue of Metawampe which the committee previously voted to 

locate near South College. After discussion, it was 



COMMITTEE 



J 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve plans as presented including the 
relocation of the statue of Metawampe. 

The committee discussed the lease arrangements for 
dormitory #15 for which the Legislature has authorized sale of 
bonds in the amount of $580,000. Trustee Brett said that the con- 
struction bid is within the authorized amount and that the bonds 
have been sold. The annual rental will amount to $37,000 and the 
building will house 200 students. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve the land and building leases for 
dormitory #15. 

President Mather and Treasurer Johnson said that if the 
capital outlay budget of the University is approved as presented to 
the Legislature by the Governor, the Trustees will have only a two- 
week period in which to name architects for the various buildings. 
Should the Trustees fail to name architects within this period, the 
Commission on Administration and Finance is free to name whatever 
architects it sees fit. They proposed, therefore, that the Trustees 
indicate now their preference of architects to be named when and if 

funds are made available for construction. It was voted to recommend 
that the Executive Committee approve employment of architects as folL 
Science Center - Third Section - James H. Ritchie & 

Associated, Boston (Preliminary study 

already completed) 

Steam & Electric Distribution Lines - Merrill Associates, 

Boston (Preliminary study already com- 
pleted) 



2135 



Dormitory #15* 



Capital 
Outlay 

Program 



Plans for Infirmary - 1. 

2. 
3. 



Leland Larsen Bradley & Hibbard, 

Boston 

Shepley, Bui finch, Richardson & 

Abbott, Boston 

Maginnis and Walsh and Kennedy, 

Boston 



ows : 

Science 
Center 



Steam & 
Electric 



Infirmary 



2136 



Maintenance 
building 



COMMITTEE 



School of 
Education 
building 



Engineering & 
Physics Shops 



Cold Storage 
Laboratory 



Lei and Lars en 
Bradley & 
Hibbard 
(payment) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Plans for General Maintenance Building - Morris W. 
Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, Associated 
Architects, Springfield (Preliminary 
study and plans already completed) 

Plans for School of Education and Laboratory Practice 
School - James A. Britton, Greenfield. 
(Preliminary study and plans already com- 
pleted) 

Plans for Engineering & Physics Shops - 

1. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & 
Abbott, Boston 

2. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, 
Associated Architects, Springfield 

3. Leland Larsen Bradley & Hibbard, Boston 

Plans for Cold Storage Laboratory - Merrill Associates, Boston 

Treasurer Johnson said that because the Comptroller's 

Bureau had changed certain payments made to Leland Larsen Bradley 

6e Hibbard of Boston in a different fiscal year from that originally 

contemplated, the University will not be able to stay within the 

amount of funds authorized by the Trustees for the consulting 

services of Niels H. Larsen. After discussion, it was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 

authorize the further amendment of the con- 
sulting contract with Leland Larsen Bradley 
& Hibbard of Boston dated November 23, 1954 
and amended June 30, 1957 to increase the 
amount of compensation for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1957 to an amount not to ex- 
ceed $2,800. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
authorize the Treasurer to amend the con- 
sulting agreement with the firm of Leland 
Larsen Bradley & Hibbard of Boston for the 
services of Niels H. Larsen as architectual 
consultant for the period July 1, 1957 
through June 30, 1958 at a sum not to exceed 
$4,000 for the year based on the hourly 
rates contained in the contract. 



' 



] 



COMMITTEE 



] 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
authorize the Treasurer to extend the con- 
tract with Whitman & Howard of Boston for 
engineering consulting services and prepara- 
tion of plans and specifications for site 
development , including roads , walks and 
parking areas, drainage and other work, for 
the period July 1, 1957 through June 30, 1958 
at a sum not to exceed $8,000 for the year 
based on the hourly rates contained in the 
contract. 

The President and Treasurer reported that the University 

has received three Federal grants from the United States Surgeon 

General totaling $359,375. Of this total amount, approximately 

$200,000 is for construction of special space in the Science 

Center for Public Health purposes and an additional $40,000 will 

be made available next year for equipment; $155,000 is to be used 

in the construction of a Psychology Laboratory as part of the 

Liberal Arts building and $20,000 will be available next year for 

equipment; $4,500 is for equipment for Bio-Chemistry. It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 

accept these Federal grants for the purposes 
outlined above. 



The meeting was adjourned at 3 o'clock. 




» ^ Secretary 



2137 



Whitman & 
Howard 
(payment) 



2 138 



COMMITTEE 



Trust Funds 

Endowment Funds 

Sprague Fund 

General 
Electric Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
August 13, 1957, 3:00 p.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Brett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Haigis, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

The committee examined the list of expenditures from un- 
restricted income from trust and endowment funds for the fiscal 
year ending June 30, 1957 and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
approve expenditures from unrestricted in- 
come from trust and endowment funds, the 
Sprague fund and the General Electric fund 
as made by the President, in accordance with 
previous authorization, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1957 as shown in the attached 
reports. 

The committee also 



VOTED ; To recommend that the Executive Committee 

authorize the President to spend not to ex- 
ceed $1,000 of the income from unrestricted 
trust and endowment funds for the fiscal 
year July 1, 1957 through June 30, 1958 
and also to authorize the President to spend 
not to exceed $500 from the Sprague fund and 
$500 from the General Electric fund for the 
same period for unrestricted purposes. 

It was 

VOTED : To recommend that the Executive Committee 
authorize the Treasurer to write off cash 
variances of three tellers in the 
Treasurer's Office for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1957 in the amount of a 
shortage of $1.28 from the unrestricted 
income from interest in the trust fund 
interest account. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



2139 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The committee discussed the investment portfolio of the 
University and it was agreed that Chairman Brett and Treasurer 
Johnson would bring specific recommendations to be acted upon by 
the committee at a later date. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4 o'clock. 




Secretary 



2L40 



COMMITTEE 



Dormitory #15 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 13, 1957, 4:00 p.m., Dr. Bartlett's Office, Boston 

Chairman Bartlett presiding 



PRESENT : Trustees Bartlett, Brett, Cashin, 
Haigis, Taber, Whitmore, President 
Mather, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
Burke 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds , it was 

VOTED : To approve the plans for dormitory #15 as 
presented. 

The committee examined the land and building leases in 

connection with dormitory #15. Chairman Bartlett recalled that on 

June 24 the Board of Trustees of the University empowered the 

Executive Committee to act for the Board on these leases. After 

discussion, it was unanimously 

VOTED : That the form of lease from The Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts to University of Massachu- 
setts Building Association of a parcel of 
land for the erection of one student dormitory 
building, all pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 
388, as amended or supplemented by Acts of 1945, 
Chapter 390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by 
Acts of 1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, 
Chapter 414, by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by 
Acts of 1953, Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, 
Chapter 400, by Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, be 
and hereby is approved as presented to chis 
meeting; and that the Trustees of the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, 
be and hereby are authorized, in the name and 
on behalf of The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in or sub- 
stantially in the form presented to this meet- 
ing, said lease of land from the Commonwealth 
to the Association and to cause the common seal 
of the University of Massachusetts to be 
affixed thereto. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : That the form of lease of one student dormitory 
building by University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Association to The Commonwealth of Massachu- 
setts pursuant to Acts of 1939, Chapter 388, as 
amended or supplemented by Acts of 1945, Chapter 
390, by Acts of 1946, Chapter 352, by Acts of 
1948, Chapter 185, by Acts of 1950, Chapter 414, 
by Acts of 1952, Chapter 211, by Acts of 1953, 
Chapter 356, by Acts of 1954, Chapter 400, and 
by Acts of 1955, Chapter 444, said building to 
be erected by said Association on a parcel of 
land to be leased to it by the Commonwealth, be 
and hereby is approved as presented to this meet- 
ing; and that the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts, or a majority thereof, be and here- 
by are authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to execute, 
acknowledge and deliver, in or substantially in 
the form presented to this meeting, said lease 
of one student dormitory building from said 
Association to the Commonwealth and to cause the 
common seal of the University of Massachusetts 
to be affixed thereto. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on Build- 
ings and Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve the plans for the Vegetable Garden- 
ing building as presented. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve the plans of the ROTC building as 
presented. 

It was also 

VOTED : To approve plans for the rally area near the 

Student Union building as presented including 

the relocation of the statue of Metawampe. 
tirkick**tt**^***ic4ck*ick****-f(-k-k*-}e'k'k-k See page 2145 for insertion 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the further amendment of the con- 
sulting contract with Leland Larsen Bradley & 
Hibbard of Boston dated November 23, 1954 and 
amended June 30, 1957 to increase the amount of 
compensation for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1957 to an amount not to exceed $2,800. 



2L41 



Vegetable 
Gardening 
building 



ROTC 
building 



Rally Area 
Student Union 
building 
Metawampe 



Leland Larsen 
Bradley & 
Hibbard 
(payment) 



2142 



COMMITTEE 



Whitman & 
Howard 
(payment) 



Federal 
Grants 



Trust Funds 

Endowment 
Funds 

Sprague Fund 

General 
Electric Fund 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to amend the con- 
sulting agreement with the firm of Leland 
Larsen Bradley & Hibbard of Boston for the 
services of Niels H. Larsen as architectual 
consultant for the period July 1, 1957 
through June 30, 1958 at a sum not to exceed 
$4,000 for the year based on the hourly rates 
contained in the contract. 

It was also 

VOTED : Ttf authorize the Treasurer to extend the con- 
tract with Whitman & Howard of Boston for en- 
gineering consulting services and preparation 
of plans and specifications for site develop- 
ment, including roads, walks and parking areas 
drainage and other work, for the period 
July 1, 1957 through June 30, 1958 at a sum 
not to exceed $8,000 for the year based on 
the hourly rates contained in the contract. 

It was also 

VOTED : To accept Federal grants in the amount of 
$359,500 for the purposes outlined below: 

$200,000 (Approximately) for costruction of 
special space in the Science Center for 
Public Health purposes. An additional $40,000 
will be made available next year for equipment, 

$155,000 for construction of a Psychology 
Laboratory as part of the Liberal Arts build- 
ing. An additional $20,000 will be made 
available next year for equipment. 

$4,500 for equipment for Bio -Chemistry. 

On the recommendation of the Trustee Committee on 

Finance, it was 

VOTED : To approve expenditures from unrestricted 
income from trust and endowment funds, the 
Sprague fund and the General Electric fund 
as made by the President, in accordance with 
previous authorization, for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1957 as shown in the 
attached reports. 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the President to spend not to 

exceed $1,000 of the income from unrestricted 
trust and endowment funds for the fiscal year 
July 1, 1957 through June 30, 1958 and also 
to authorize the President to spend not to ex- 
ceed $500 from the Sprague fund and $500 from 
the General Electric fund for the same period 
for unrestricted purposes. 

It was also 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer to write off cash 
variances of three tellers in the Treasurer's 
Office for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1957 
in the amount of a shortage of $1.28 from the 
unrestricted income from interest in the trust 
fund interest account. 

On the recommendation of President Mather, it was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to sign contract 
with the Western Massachusetts Electric 
Company providing for the continuation of the 
half-time services of Frank R. Longley, Visit- 
ing Professor, in the amount of $2,652 for the 
academic year 1957-58. 

It was 

VOTED : To authorize the President to sign an agree- 
ment with Amherst College for the half-time 
services of Richard A. Gregg as Visiting Pro- 
fessor for the academic year 1957-58 at the 
rate of one-half the compensation paid Mr. 
Gregg by Amherst College. 

On the recommendation of the Treasurer and the President, 



it was 



VOTED : To approve the budget for the operation of the 
GE-Pittsfield Program for the academic year 
1957-58 in accordance with the attached outline. 

It was also 

VOTED : To establish a fee of $18.00 per semester credit 
hour for all students attending the GE-Pittsfield 
Program other than those whose fees and expenses 
are paid by the General Electric Company under - 
the Trust Agreement with the Trustees. 



2L43 



Western 
Massachusetts 
Electric 
Company 



Amherst 
College 



General 
Electric 



2L44 



COMMITTEE 

Controller 



Shannon 
McCune 
(travel) 



H. T. U. Smith 
(travel) 



Richard S, 
Stein 
(travel) 



Personnel 



Marie Barbara 
Kelleher 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was 

VOTED : To authorize change in the spelling of the 
word "Controller" in the minutes of the 
June 24 meeting in connection with the 
appointment of L. L. Taylor as Controller 
of the University. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the following assignments of staff 
members on duty status outside the United 
States. No state funds are involved. 

Shannon McCune , Provost of the University, to 
Tokyo and Kara, Japan, to Sapporo University 
in Japan and to Korea as American delegate to 
the Regional Conference of the International 
Geographical Union and as University delegate 
in conferences in connection with the cooperative 
which the University is undertaking with 
Hokkaido for approximately 7 weeks beginning 
August 11, 1957. 

H. T. U. Smith , Head of the Department of 
Geology, to Madrid and Barcelona, Spain during 
the period August 15 through September 22, 1957 
(approximate dates) to attend meetings and 
technical excursions of the International 
Quaternary Association Congress for the purpose 
of establishing contacts and obtaining informa- 
tion relative to the University's research con- 
tract with the office of Naval Research. 

Richard S. Stein , Associate Professor of 
Chemistry, to Prague, Czechoslovakia, 
August 31 through September 16, 1957 to deliver 
a paper at the symposium on macro -molecular 
chemistry. This symposium is sponsored by the 
International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. 

On the recommendation of the President, it was 

VOTED : To approve the attached list of appointments, 
extra compensation, corrections in summer 
employment, salary adjustments and reinstate- 
ment. 

On the recommendation of the Registrar and the Provost, 









it was 



I 



VOTED : To award the degree Bachelor of Science to 
Marie Barbara Kelleher as of May 17, 1942. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Miss Kelleher completed all requirements for the degree 
in 1942 but owed $75 on a loan so that the degree was not awarded. 
Her account was paid in July 1946 but through oversight the Uni- 
versity failed to award the degree at that time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:15 p.m. 




A— Secretary 



Chairman 



******* 

On the recommendation of the Committee on Buildings and 

Grounds, it was 

VOTED : To approve employment of architects as follows: 

Science Center - Third Section - James H. Ritchie & Associates, 

Boston (Preliminary study already completed) 

Steam & Electric Distribution Lines - Merrill Associates, 

Boston (Preliminary study already completed) 

Plans for Infirmary - 1. Leland Larsen Bradley & Hibbard, 

Boston 

2, Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott 
Boston 

3. Maginnis and Walsh and Kennedy, Boston 

Plans for General Maintenance Building - Morris W. Maloney & 

Henry J. Tessier, Associated Architects, 
Springfield (Preliminary study and plans 
already completed) 

Plans for School of Education and Laboratory Practice School - 

James A. Britton, Greenfield. (Preliminary 
study and plans already completed) 

Plans for Engineering & Physics Shops - 

1. Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson & Abbott, 
Boston 

2. Morris W. Maloney & Henry J. Tessier, 
Associated Architects, Springfield 

3. Leland Larsen Bradley & Hibbard, Boston 
Plans for Cold Storage Laboratory - Merrill Associates, Boston 



2145 



2L46 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 






I 






&ttg 1 



mv?m$m of masachusstts 



PITTSFXffiD FROGEAH 
SOSG1X FOR THE' FISCAL TEAR 
m* l, 195? to JOT2 30 v 19S8 



|WH,u * wwawnapwwta mi u iim awNtagw 



General Electric Tr«»£ ^j 

Fees <a $iS o 0® p@r semester credit few 15 



, £=i'tt«aw*e»«*M&t**.«wt>twr - 



3si«l Services 

instructors $£,q 500 

8,700 

{on e&opiss)* 4 8 500 

Tots! Personal Service® 
Travel Saqpense (faculty & staff) 
Adsaissietrative Es^«is®© (supplies, tel*, etc,}; 



c^SMuvuu-^uwBMMHMitMaiacftiiMe 



Total Mcssa© 






penditures $27300 



iiiiiainmiiniu.il . 1 iTWT-im 

'1 wt**ilai*LjU*-*v-ci rn^: 



*Bssed cm office «nd secretarial &3s£sta*see belos furnished 

by GoE« 



Estimate d Enrollment 

:>gr«ffi &„ eponsorad student 

-Program (fe«»paying etudent $0 

1 
Total E&ttemk®& Enrollment 90 



DlstnaraeoNinta - Onreatricted 

Trust Wand® for the Period 



SpnuBie Fund 

©asn CahlU - Enter tai-H_*-nt,, Br* HeGraeh & Mr. Weifeahach $32.60 

Louis H. Bell • Consulting ^n©$ & Expenses 150 „ 32 

F&ircfeild Aerial Surveys » i Aerc^Ektaelrcciae transparency 440.00 



Travel & Esq for S ;^£ob*rs on- problctDDs of 53 , 

Business Adeaisiistratioa 

teat-tins - -framing 3 Pictures 75.00 
Donald Cadigan - Travel to Rutgers Univ. to attend a Special 45.16 

Confersace ©a Extension Education 

Judd Paper Coo - Cards & Envelopes £m Ssmior Class Rae. 17*84 

tea l_. Sarnsvorth, M.8. - Professional Servieea. 35.00 

I, t>» CKtas' Ptg, Co, - 1/6 page ad in Kareii Issue of 27.50 



__.ii 



1 



tod Jeffary inn - Expenses of fe_ TriBJBar, candidate 6.50 

for Flsysics Sept. 

Dean Cahill • Meals and entertaining 0s? o Triasier 7 a 00 

l-ord Jeffary Inn * Espouses for Irateiniarionai Weekend 10.80 

Sfsrtha R„ ftrlgfet - Entertaining Prof, & Mrs. Soaaneon 7.50 
./:*dcnt Onion Food Service - 3 2_tmcheon# - Xnveetmant 

Series Lectures 3 o 4g 

Student Union Food Service - 30 Dinners - Geology 55,^0 

Teachers. Association 

Wiggins Tavern ■- expenses of candidate for Sean* Sehool 15.62 

of Business A<teiaisferation 

Student tfnion Food Service - refresh-seats for tenet iag of 9,30 



General Electric Fund 



:" ■ ■ MMOl «W-_. ■»■ >_- ■ --___■.-■- 



J 



$991.82 



Travelers Checks arid Interest paid to hmk for l®m - $65.00 

trip to Japan 

Z Bur si-tan. Prices 40.00 

Stndunt Union Food Serv. - 4 luneheons - Tr&ateee? Meeting 14.72 

University Coaraons - 17 Lnneheona 16.15 

2 Flint Frizes 40° 00 

D-taond Uniom St_aap Works - 3 Sta.sp® $^©5 

applies for Student Reception 16°, 70 

Student Union Food Service - Heals Served 45.' 20 

100 ¥iaw@ of C_j_$!iL_© .0 Q0 

Student Onion Food Service - Kaals Served 28.93 

Robert* Flowers - Flowers for Dedication of Thayer Building ill 66 

Bo So Office of Education - Travel for Dr. Gertrude Lewi© 25„O0 

Faculty Club - luncheon for Ushers at CcsroeacasBent l c 25 
Oaivarslty Commons - Dinner for Social Science Council Guests 20 00 

University Store - Supplies for Open House 7 C 45 

Total Disbursements - General Electric Fund $358. H 

August l 9 *957 






[I 



UHXVSRS2T? OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Msbur seaeat a '- Unrestricted 
BndowiaeTat Funds Co? the Period 
July I, 1956«June 30, 1957 



Burnhaaa Emergency 

Colorado Depto of Public Health $ 2 o 00 

John Ho Voadell - 35 enlargements of chart 2l o 00 

Stontgotsery Goo - flower p for Conference of 14 50 

Trustees? of Stats Universities 

University Gcsaaons - lAinchaoas for Student 47o20 

Advisers Keating 

Mon&gonery Coo - flowers for saeetiag of Association 4o50 

of Gov Bdso of State Institutions 

Arthur o B«an - 2 8x10 prints of new Classroom £«,§© 

Building 

Ho lo Hewell - Meekly Calendars from Sept. 1955- 150 o 00 

May 1956 

University GoEssons - 7 Meals 6 c 65 

University Cossaons - 2 Meals l o 90 

Aahsrst Journal - 50 proofs lot Public Relations 5o00 

Office 

Roberts Flowers - Flowers for service of 20 o 60 

Hrso Eo Lo MeHasaara 

Lord Jeff airy Inn - 5 Luncheons - Government 18,67 

Research Council 

Student Union Food Service - 8 Luncheons 12,64 

Hotel Statler - 3 Luncheons for Trustees Meeting i6o74 

Student Union Food. Service - 11 .Dinners - Council 9 

of Slurs ing 

Student Uuion Food Service » 9 Luncheons (Provost) 14 

Hotel Statlcr - 3 Luncheons - Trustees Meeting 14*97 

Student Union Foot! Service - 5 Luncheon® (Provost) 5o23 



Frederick Eo Read 



Tifci ■!■■'■ :. ii p ■-••»« 



William R Sessions 

Hotel Statle? - 3 Luncheons - Trustees Meeting $ 13*23 

University Store - 700 Copies Holiday Reception 4o97 

Invitations 

University Cosaaons - 10 Meals - Valley Group 9»50 

Charles Bffeabilla - Turing Piano 4*00 

Lord Jeffery Inn - Expenses of J LoBuck 34o73 

Mrso Stephen Allen - Relaburseaeat - supplies 10 00 

for Reception 



$368 o 12 



50o00 



Dfeburraeatfl - fcreeetricted Eafa« sfc aa s . Page 2 

£yJdU&JL_JS*i£gg& (Continued^ 

Stesrards Club .' Reception « ,* , 

Student Union Food Service - 7 Dianers ? ?H? 

University Cmmons * 5 Meals il ° 06 

University Cmmom - Coffee, etc for Floe Arts 2 o°oo 

Cornell 
Student Union - 9 Umefieoas for President Matter 

& P.arty 

HIIMsJLiWfeeeier 



Total Biabut>se*ents - Usarestrieted 



28 o 35 



15 o 00 

19 00 

I3o00 

5o70 



MoB&Soniry Co. - flowers for .Funeral of E*-Cov El* 

Si EV l 2 J«*T« - ^Si^eriag Convocation^ 

Carl Howard * Color Fkotm of Caopus 

University Coram* - 6 Binner© for President Matns* 
toivmlty Cocoas . 6 Sinners "««* Wfctr 

Hotel sutler - 5 Luncheon* . Trustees Meeting ,f°ea 

a, lo- »e«eU - Certifiers for feeaorary degree for 

uauersicy Canons - f Meals - v^s «ad Mums 
__ J CosBaietft® 

University Ccroaoas - 5 Heals 

TT^^^l ~ J* ^ - Ubw «*■** Group 
Jofe» C s ^SS? \l ^Z* 1 ®**** ?**«> cards, etc, 

Joan So sfesteott - loving Piano f°™ 

*'*. So B Undsey - reimoursaseat for 650 . 2 utaaps 

M * „ , , fof> R«ception t , rt« 

Mai Hall Orchestra - Faculty Reception «°^ 

University Cocoas - 6 Meals 5 °°?° 

Dr. Joseph Brady . Address at SigEa Xi J! ZX 

Ite^erMty Store -Supply for F Sity Reception ^"2 

2JZSJ? ■? BIB0M ' i8 !»«*•«• *« Air Corps ^ 

University Cosusons - if Heals - M?a Mrrs.ii~.Lko 

«*er S t College • 1 ui~ l U4 f S^SSffi ' "** 

Boston YSCA . service duwg. for ta <!%£&, 

of University Advisory Council 
A, J. Hastings - Supplies for Finals Council 



Ho GO 

14.50 
1*35 
8„5S 

4c 75 
Ho 40 
19o7G 
20 o 00 



4o75 

49.00 

9 o 0© 

1 0S8 

Ho 25 



3o?0 



183 . 74 



392 , 94 



$994 o 80 



August 1, 1957 






- 



Schedule a~1 

Endowment Funds - Principal 
as of June 30, 1957 



Summary of Fool Investments 



Invested in: 
mis 

Government 
/ Railroad 



Stocks 

Pre ferred 

Industrial 
Utility 

Gossoon 

Financial 
Industrial 
Investment Trust 
Utilities 



Book 
Value 


% of 
Total 
Book Value 


$79,403.31 
5 9 977o50 
5,050.89 


20.5 

It o J 

1.3 


90,431 o 70 


<&<£ Q «5 


70 s 623oil 


18,3 



6,450,00 

3,840o00 

10,290.00 

4,291.07 

37,925.75 

5,300.00 

52,866.52 



& 1 


,6 


1 


,0 


2 


,6 


1, 


,1 


9< 


8 


1< 


,3 


■L Jv c 


6 



100 . 383 o 34 



25o8 



T0&2I - Pool Securities 



$271,733.15 



70.0 



Cash - 

Amherst Savings Bank @ 3% 
Eesthempton Savings Bank @ 3% 
Itoe Savings Bank @ 3 1/4Z 
Uninvested Cash 



Total - Cash 



TOTAL 



POOL XKVESTMEKT 



56 , 332 56 
17,300.00 
40,913.83 

247 . 75 

114,794.14 
$386,527.29 




30.0 



100.0 



Sumaary of Investments not in Pool 
Ir.fM Stock $7(500o00 



I 



URXV-ERS1TY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Schedule A- I 

Endowment Funds - Principal 

Statement of Fool Investments 

as of June 30, 1957 



Dei sg jgtigo 



Date of 

Acquisition 



Cost or 
Book Value 



32,700 Uo So Saviags loads, Series G, 2 1/2* e, 

due 3/1/58 



5,000 Uo So Savings Bonds, Series G, 2 1/2'a 

due 7/1/58 

23 , 500 0, So Savings Bonds, Series K, 2.76X, 

due 6/1/64 

18,000 Uo So Treasury 3 1/4" s, du& 

June 15, 1983/78 

500 Uo So Savings Bonds., Series 6. 2 i/2 9 s 

due 1/1/57 



3/12/46 

7/19/46 

6/30/52 

12/31/56 

1/20/45 



$32, 700 „ 00 

5,000o00 
23, 500 o 00 

17,703o31 
500.00 



Total * Government Bonds 



$79,403.31 



Mortga ges 

Massaehuyetes Beta House 
Corporation 

Gaema Delta Chapter of 



4% 



4% 
Mas So Kappa Corporation of 

Sigma Alpha gpsilon 4% 

Phi Lambda Tau, Inc., The Tau Pi 
Cfaapto of Tau Epsilon 4% 
Tau 

Theta Corporation of Theta 4% 

Ctei 



Date of Years 
Acquisition Ramalnini 



12/20/46 13 
10/14/46 9 

14 

Demand 
16 



1/6/47 
10/9/54 



Principal 



24, 000 o 00 



7,500 o 00 



Present 
Value 



$ 8,500 o 00 $ 5,000,00 



13,795o06 



20,000o00 15,000.00 



1,833.05 



40,000.00 35,000.00 



Total - Mortgages 



$100, 000 „ 00 $70 9 628 .11 



7/&0/57 



I 



I 



1 












SfeareS 



>QP 



so 



300 

100 



91 



1 



De 



■"S Stocls 



sna 



4% 



- 

Afttalgas&te* s 8 Lissitsd 

American Sur gf Kale 15 

£5 
Asasriesra T<slo & Tel.-. Co* 45 

15 



■*ric«n Sugar Refining Co* i 3/4% 7/19/51 



1/23/53 



1/19/51 



7/19/51 







6 








17 








8 


U 


too 


Bftlfclaere Ga$ & Eieetri© 






52 


Ccffisnonwealth Edig<ss 




7/at/si 


100 


Eolc DuPeat d© N@siou?Jf C©o 




7/19/51 


80 


Fire As e *ao of PMl&dtlpfeia 


36 


7/19/51 






36 


2/26/54 






8 


11/6/S6 


173 


Hartford Else trie Light G© a 




1/8/54 


25 


$ortfe@m Illinois Gas* Co* 




5/6/55 


200 


Niagara Mohawk Poles' 




4/25/57 


500 


uress 




3/6/5? 


100 


Stm&ard Oil Co of Indiana 


50 


7/19/51 








11/6/54 




d Oil C.Oc Of $cJo 




7/19/51 






1 


11/6/53 






181 


5/6/56 






1 


12/26/56 


too 


Southern Company 




4/15/57 


200 


Tri^Cssctitjeatal Corp* 




3/6/57 


75 


United Fruit 




7/19/51 


740 


Virginia EieGo & Power Coo 


33? 


1/8/54 






33 


12/6/54 



®est ©r 
B@©k Value 


Market 
Value 


$ 6 8 450c00 


$ 6 9 325o00 


3 8 840o00 


2 9 ?90 o 00 



io H 290,00 



$ lc00# 
l 8 300o00 



At3g42<£o27 

7»0l4c76 
l 9 418o00 
9 8 425o00 



2»991o07 

9, 564^68 

192 . 79 

6 S 135*38 

13,875,00 

3 fl 518o75 



6 8 006o00 

4 9 577 n 6i 
5 9 3C0 o 00 
SjlOOoOO 

I0 8 541o0| 



$ 9,115oOO 



l»875o00 



15 a 811 r 25 
6 9 800.00 
2,203o50 

19 9 250,00 



3,280.00 
9*428*50 

273«75 
5 9 875o00 

17 ? 56'I.-5C 

5 8 187o50 



18 8 084o00 
4 8 800„00 
6 9 500o00 
3 9 375o00 

17 . 390 „ 00 



y 



Total - Con&Bon Sfeook 



* r 



$100,383*34 



750 



mr in ryoe^s 7 liquidation 

atem enfe of Investment not in Pool Fund 
David Buttriek 7X 3/8/54 



$ 7 9 500o00 



$137 9 796 o 00 



I 



I 



Sebedul* A-i {€©nfclsau®d> 



of June' 30» 1957 



C&@t or 



Valug 



Railroad Bond? 



G». 4 1/2 •*, dM 6/65 f 3 » 000 * 00 $ 2,955,00 

3 8 000 Ssutfo^na ?&ei£i<s {Grggoa Usaas) 

First, 4 l/2°», dwa 3/1/77 1951 2 977.50 



2.?©0 o 00 



$ 5*715 



..UUlltgy Boeds 

S ^ to California Bdisoa C©o 8 3,000 - 1951 $ 5 050 m * 1 ms ™ 

Ut & Rag 3°® 8 dua 9/1/65 1,000 . 1941 ~ _- $ ^.625.00 



J 



APPOSKTEflBKrS ABOVE MXHIMUM 

Albert S. Anthony, Associate Professor of Secondary Educations 
effective September 1, 1S57 at $6703 per year (3 steps above 
miaimum). B.S. Trinity; A.M.T. Harvard; D.Ed, Harvard, Ee is 

currently Academic £ean of American International College, 

J. T. Clayton, Associate Professor "A" Agricultural Engineer lag, 
effective September 15, 195? at $8372 per year (5 steps above 
minimum). B.S. in Agricultural Engineering University of Tennessee; 
M.S. in Agricultural Engineering University of Illinois. Currently 
employed in the Department of Agricultural Engineer iag at the 
University of Illinois. 

Charles A. Eerald, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
effective September 1, 1957 at $553S per year (2 steps above fctLnimam). 
B.S. and M.S. Balhousie University, Halifax, torn Scotia. Currently 
is Assistant Professor at the California State Polytechnic College. 

C. E. Hunter, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, effective 
September 1, 1957 at $6006 per year (4 steps above minimum). B.S, in 
H»B. Carnegie Institute of Technology. At present he is with Convair 
Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation of Sort Worth, Tesas* 

Theodore H. lead, Associate Professor "A" Agriculture! Economics, 
effective December 1, 1957 at $8,372 per year (5 steps above minimis)* 
B.S. , M.S. and Ph.D. Ohio State University. Currently employed in 
Extension Service at Ohio State University. 

Marjorie M. Merchant, Assistant Professor "A s % Extension Specialist in 
Consumer Education, effective September 15, 1957 at $6435 per year 
(2 steps above minimum). B.S. University of Maine; Vi.S, Pennsylvania 
State University. She is cow employed as a Specialist in Consumer 
Food Marketing with the Regional Extension Marketing Education Program, 

Joseph M. 0* Byrne, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
effective Septes&er I, 1957 at $6006 per year (4 steps above minimum). 
B.S. in M.E. University of Cincinnati; M.S. in M.E. University of 
Kentucky. At present he is supervisor of the Hydrodynamics Section of 
the Advanced Eeactor Design Group with the nuclear cosine project of 
Pratt and Eaitcey Aircraft. 



J 



EXTRA CCMPSBSATIOK 

Louis A» Carpino, Assistant Professo*.* "A" of Cheaslstry under 
Uo S. Asn^ contract from June 3, 1957 to August 31, 1957 at 
$113 * 15 per tteek. 

H. T« U. Smith, Head of Depart&ont of Geology under Kaval Research 
Contract fresa July 1, 1957 to August 9, 1957 at $164.75 per week 
or $988* SO o 

Richard S. Stein, Associate Professor "A" of Chemistry under 13U S* 
Navy contract from June 3, 1957 to September 3, 1957 at $149.00 

per xseek,. 

John S« Foster, Asst. Prof. "A" of Agric. BcoKomics for $113.25 per 
ts3e& fross Federal funds for the period July 30 through August 28, 1957. 

CORRE CTION W SUMMER EMPLOYM FT 

mi- — ii- ' " " — ' ' ■■"■-■■-- 

Bronislaw M„ Honisberg, Assistant Professor of Zoology under Public 
Health Grant E-742C2 from June 17, 1957 to August 17, 1957 at 
$136.66 per week. (Previously approved at $120.00 per ««2ek)« 

In place of Seysour Budin, Department of English, who was approved 
for the period July 1 to August 10, 1957 on a 50 percent teaching 
basis, wa recosBsend Assistant Professor Donald Sears (non-university 
faculty aesfeer) be approved as the replacement on a 50 percent basis 
during Che above period. His rate of compensation should be $63.37 
per week or $380.22 for the six laeaUs. 



APPOINTMENTS 



Isaac C. Caaber, Instructor "A" Food Technology (hal£~tis&), 
effective July 1, 1957 at $2535 per year* 



SAIABY ADJUSTMENT 

William Co Starkweather, Registrar's Office, from Instructor "A" 
to Assistant Registrar, grade 13, effective July 1, 1957 at annual 
salary of $5,525 (4 steps above alnirausi). 



REINSTATEMENT 



Otto P. Pflanse, Assistant Professor in History effective September 1, 
1957 at $6006 per year (4 steps above mlniaua) „ Ke has been working 
in Germany on a study of BisaarcU. 



University of Massachusetts 

]? .S 2 .2 £ £ £ i* H £ 
From Arnold D» Rhodes, Dept* of Forestry & Wildlife Mgt. Date Feb. k$ 1957 
To Dean of the Graduate School 
Subject Graduate Program in Forestry 

Permission is requested of the Graduate School Council to develop a program 
of graduate studies in forestry leading to an M»S degree. The Department has 
been offering graduate work in wildlife management since 19k2* 

From time to time in the past, the Department has considered the desirability 
of establishing a graduate program in forestry to complement that in wildlife 
management. Until recently, however, it has been our opinion that the time was 
not right for such an undertaking. In the past there were two strong reasons which 
lead to this decision j poor physical facilities, and disinterest on the part of 
the Agricultural Experiment Station in forestry as a field of research. There 
was the additional consideration that the institution of a full undergraduate 
professional curriculum in forestry and its accreditation were recent developments. 
We preferred to consolidate our position at the undergraduate level before 
proceeding further « 

Today, we believe that circumstances warrant a reversal of our previous 
decisions not to enter the graduate field. We think that our undergraduate offering 
is now firmly grounded and will not only provide adequate foundation for a grad- 
uate program but will at the same time benefit materially from it. Furthermore, 
in recent years the Agricultural Experiment Station has shown an awareness of the 
need for research in our fields In 1951* for the first time it gave support to 
specific projects in forestry, and in 1956 an additional staff position was 
authorized with primary duties in researcho The Department now has a research 
program involving several Experiment Station projects. Resolution of our housing 
problem while not yet achieved now appears nearer accomplishment;, New qiarters 
should be available in the not-too-distant future. 

As a measure of the Departments concern for graduate work, the record of 
its graduates who go on for farther study is of interest,, Since 1933, nineteen 
\ f men in Wildlife Management and 75 in Forestry have received graduate degrees or 

are now working for then* including four doctorates for majors in wildlife manage- 
ment and six for forestry. Since World War II when forestry was first taught as 
a full professional curriculum 51 foresters will have obtained a graduate degree 
by this coming June,, representing k? per cent of our graduates during this period. 
Several others have been accepted for admission pending completion of military 
service. Degrees have been received from the f«fi3wa^g--i2is^itirSiorw* British.... 
Colunbia^ Colorado State, Duke, Harvard, Idaho, Iowa State^ Maine.. Massachusetts, 
Michigan, Missouri, Montana, North Carolina State, Oklahoma A & M, Oregon State, 
Syracuse, Utah, Washington, Wisconsin, and Iale c 

If the request to develop a graduate program is granted it is our intention 
to proceed slowly in thp beginning. There are now strong prospects that ^3500*41*000 
will become available from the State Experiment Station Division of the 17©8J),A» 
for participation in a regional research project involving several Northeastern 



r 




states* Our contributing project, which is already underway, is being carried 
on in the iield of forest soils under Dr* Maderj and if the funds become available 
as anticipated it is our plan to initiate our graduate program here* There is 
also the possibility that another regional project in marketing may provide the 
base for a second graduate problem. We are prepared to handle graduate work in 
certain phases of our field but not in others. We recognize these limitations* 

Attached you will iind a short brochure providing information concerning the 
historical development of the Department, its staff, publications, current research 
program, and proposed new graduate courses of which there are four in addition to 
the thesis. No additional personnel will be needed to develop these new offerings* 
Our graduate curriculum will be based to a large extent upon course work in other 
departments as, for example, in Botany and Agronomy for the proposed problem in 
forest soils. The courses in forestry currently listed in the catalog in the 100 
series qualify for minor credit only as the catalog is now printed* If our grad- 
uate program becomes a reality these courses except for 151 should then become 
eligible for major credit also* 



Arnold D« Rhodes 
Department Head 



A Brief Chronological Summary Concerning the Program 
in Forestry at the University of Massachusetts* 

Although not part of any organized work in forestry at the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College the series of five lectures on timber physics given by 
Dr, B f E, Fernow in 18°7 has historical importance because it was the first of its 
kind. It was in fact the first series of technical lectures ever given by a 
professional forester to a body of American students* 

Professor Frank A 9 Waugh, for many years Head of the Division of Horticulture* . 
recognized the need for organized offerings in forestry— for two reasons: 1 # T© 
serve the needs of interested students, 2, To look toward the development of the 
forest as one of Massachusetts 1 most vital natural resources. For some years 
Prof,. Waugb" ^offered what may be termed informal'lectures in forestry*. 

In 1909; Franklin Moon was brought to the College as & staff member of the 
Division of Horticulrure* He left after one year, being replaced by William 
Darrow Clark, a capable forester who remained until about 1920, During his 
"term of office" he organized several formal courses in forestry but not a full 
curriculum meriting professional recognition. 

During Prof, Claris term, which fortunately coincided with the administration 
of President Butter field, Kt, Toby Demonstration Forest of 755 acres was secured 
for the College and the Department of Forestry* A long history of the forest could 
be given and it would be of genuine professional interest, but suffice it to 
say here that this valuable property has been consistently used for student 
education, experimentation, and demonstration, and at the same time it has been 
productive of forest materials and revenue. 

Much later, in 1°$2, Mrs. Esther Cadwell gave to the Department of Forestry 
and Wildlife Management some 1200 acres lying in the town of Pelham, This area 
and Mt, Toby provide the Department with excellent laboratories lying within 20 
minutes of the University campus* 



\ 

i 

Mr. 1*R. Grose followed Prof* Clark when he left in 1920 and remained for 
approximately 10 years. 

During Prof. Grose f s term a few courses in forestry were offered to studgite 
of the College and some offerings were provided for studsits of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. When for various reasons it was decided to make a personnel. 
change, R.P. ffoldsworth was brought to the College from the University of Arkansas 
where he had been Professor of Forestry. 

In connection with the program of instruction at that time, three things 
seemed to be both possible and desirable: l) to offer courses valuable as being 
cognate to agriculture and also as being broadly explanatory of the economic 
objectives of forest management, 2) to orient and give basic preparation for 
students who would go on to professional study elsewhere at the graduate level, 
and 3) to give more courses of a vocational character to students in the Stockbridge 
School — a program which was developed in the next several years. 

Through the friendly offices of Dean Henry Solon Graves of the Yale School 
of Forestry it was made possible for qualified students who had completed their 
junior year at Massachusetts to enroll at the Yale ochool of Forestry. On the 
successful completion of the first year there, the student received the Bachelor *s 
degree from Massachusetts, and a second satisfactory year earned him the Master of 
Forestry degree from Yale. This plan worked well and was described by Graves and 
Guise in their book on education in forestry. This "pre-professional" curriculum 
with some modifications from time to time constituted the main offering in forestry 
until I9I48 when a full professional program was instituted. 

In 1933, Prof. J» Harry Rich was added to the staff. For some years Mr. Rich 
has handled instruction in the fields of forest products and utilization beside 
giving valuable service in the organization and operation of special schools. 
In 1936 additional positions were created, filled by Dr. R.E. Trippensee as 

Professor of Wildlife Management, and James D. Curtis as an instructor in forestry. 

Departmental offerings in Wildlife Management at the undergraduate level date 
from the arrival of Dr. Trippensee. The graduate program was undertaken in 19i*2, 
and for a time prior to World War II wildlife management was taught in the Stock- 



bridge School also. This last prdgram has Since been discontinued* 

When Mr. Curtis resigned in 19%9 his position was taken by Arnold D. Rhodes. 
Prof. Rhodes utlimately became Department Head on September 1, 1?56, replacing 
Prof. Holdsworth who reverted to a teaching professorship at his own request. 
Prof. Rhodes* field of specialization is dendrology, silvics, and silviculture. 

A further addition to the forestry staff was made in 19hZ in the person of 
Paul W. Stickel, well known for research in fire control. Prof„ Stickel resigned 
in 1952 on account of sickness. He was succeeded by Herschel Go Abbott, who 
brought with him a considerable experience in the practical field* Mr. Abbott 1 s 
assignments concern instruction and research in forest protection, dendrology, 
silviculture, and nursery practice. 

Because of the increasing demand for a complete professional curriculum in 
forestry two more instruct orships were made available to the Department in 191*8 to 
meet the increased student load and to assist in handling new courses which were 
added to bring our curriculum up to acceptable professional standards. These 
standards were such as to meet the requirements set by the U.S. Forest Service 
and forest industries, and, further, to enable our graduates to obtain the Master 
of Forestry degree through a single year : s study at one of the institutions 
offering instruction on a graduate basis. Thus, in 191*8 for the first time the 
Department offered a complete professional curriculum in forestry, and this date 
marks the end of what can be called the period of pre-professional training. 

The ye-^.r I9I48 was notable also for expansion of research activities in 
wildlife management. At this time the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research 
•Unit became attached to the Department under the able - direction > of .Dr. William G. 
Sheldon. The Unit is- not an integral "part of the University but -rather ' is based 
on it, receiving its monetary backing from the -Federal Government, the State, and 
certain private sources, much of which is used to support graduate students. 



-a- 

The two instructors added ill l°l*8 were William P. MacConnell and Alton ©. Cole, 
When Mr. Cole left for duty with the Air Force (where he has remained) his place 
was taken by Robert V, Ganley, and still later in 195>6 by Robert S. Bond who has 
had considerable field experience in forestry in the South and more recently in 
the Massachusetts Division of Forests and Parks, Prof, MacConnell specializes 
in mensuration, phot ogramme try, and management, Mr, Bond handles instruction in 
harvesting and farm forestry, and assists in other courses. 

In 1?$0 the forestry curriculum was accredited as having full professional 
standing by the Society of American Foresters, This accreditation was given after 
a long and detailed study and was not easily attained* We had to overcome the 
effects of poor ouarters and none-too-generous budgetary support by the University 
Administration. Our staff was rated highly by the accrediting agency as was the 
work beirij done in the field by our graduates. Our department became one of the 
2J> professionally accredited forestry institutions, Yale University and the 
University of Maine are the only other accredited schools in New England, This was 
a major milestone in the Department's development. 

In 19$h the Department undertook a supported program of research in forestry. 
Heretofore individual staff members had undertaken projects of their own which 
were carried on as they could be fitted in with other work. These projects have 
proved to be well worthwhile and several of them have become the basis for research 
problems now fully supported by the Experiment Station of which this department is 
presently a recognized and working element. This development is also a milestone 
of major significance, as a consequence of this expanded program, Br # Donald I* 
Mader, a specialist in forest soils, was added to the staff in 1°£6, to work nearly 
full time on res-arch problems© 

The addition of Dr, Mader brings our present staff to eight including 
Dr, Trippensee in Wildlife Management, but not Dr, Sheldon, Leader of the Coopera- 
tive Wildlife Research Unit* 



•6- 

Our departmental growth has been steady and has not been allowed at any time 
td expand beyond the point where it rested on a sound foundation. Our graduates 
have been successful as they have gone on to graduate schools for further study 
and have been equally successful in the fields of Government service and private 
forest industry * 

Staff and Cooperating Personnel 
Arnold D. Rhodes, Professor of Forestry and Head of Department. University of 
New Hampshire, B«S # , 193k', Yale School of Forestry, M.F., 1937. Two years 
with the U*S, Forest Service, three years in the U.S» Navyj the University 
of Massachusetts since 1939* Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Society of American 
Foresters, Ecological Society of America, British Ecological Society, 

Robert P. Holdsworth, Professor of Forestry (Head of Department from 1933-1956.) 
Michigan State University, B.S. in Forestry, 1911$ Yale School of Forestry, 
M.F., 1928$ Scandinavian- American Fellowship, Royal College of Forestry, 
Stockholm, Sweden, 1928-9. Three years with the U»S, Forest Service, eight 
years in family business (non- forestry), one year at University of Arkansas 
as Head of Forestry Department, two years in U # S # Army, Morld War I, and two 
in World War II plus one year as Head of Forestry Department, American 
Shrivenham University, Shrivenham, England, the University of Massachusetts 
since 1930 including one sabbatical leave* Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Society 
of American Foresters, American Geographical Society, A # A.A«S* 

William P» MacConnell, Assistant Professor of Forestry, University of Massachusetts, 
B,S., 19U3, Yale School of Forestry, M.F., 19l*7« One year plus six summers 
with firm of consulting foresters, two years with U«S, Army, University of 
Massachusetts since 19l*8 # Society of /imerican Foresters, American Society 
of Photogrammetry (Photo-Interpretation Committee)* 



1 v 






Donald L, leader, Lim.st&tti Prtffesrcr (fes. search) in Fors&tjy, Nt ,; 3Ljk St./U 

College of Forestry, Syracuse University, B.S., 1950; University of Wisconsin, 
M.S. (Soils), 19$h, Ph.D. (soils), 1956. One year U.S. Navy, one year 
N.I. State Conservation Department, one year in family business, the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts since 1956. Soil Science Society of America, Sigma Xi» 

Herschel G. Abbott, Instructor in Forestry. University of Maine, B.S., 19h3$ 

Harvard University School of Forestry, M.F., 1952 ; additional graduate work 
Harvard 1952-3. Three years U.S. Navy, four years as a forester with a 
lumber company in Maine, University of Massachusetts since 1953. Xi Sigma Pi, 
Society of American Foresters. 

Robert S. Bond, Instructor in Forestry, University of Massachusetts, B.S., 1951$ 
Tale School of Forestry, M.S., 1952. Three years in U.S. Coast Guard, two 
years as a forester with a lumber company in Arkansas, one year with 
Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources, University of Massachusetts 
since 1956. Society of American Foresters. 

<J« Harry Rich, Associate Professor of Forestry, New York State College of Forestry, 
Syracuse University, B S a , 1913, M.F., 1937, special courses in Agricultural 
Economics and Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, 19hl and 19hhm Sixteen 
years in business manufacturing and merchandizing lumber and other forest 
products, University of Massachusetts since 1933 including one year sabbatical 
and three years leave of absence during World War II as wood technologist 
with the Army Air Corps and the Forest Products Laboratory ("J e S. Forest 
Service). Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Society of American Foresters, New England 
Kiln Drying Association (Secretary), Technical Association of the Pulp and 
Paper Industry, Northeastern Wood Utilization Council, Forest Products 
Research Society. 



"•7** 

Reuben E« Trippensee, Professor bt Wildlife Management, Michigan State College, 
B.S., 1920; University of Michigan, M.S, (Zoology), Ph.D # (Wildlife Manage- 
ment), 1931»*hm Two years as Assistant Conservationist U.S. Forest Service, 
University of Massachusetts since 1936, Signa Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Zeta, 
Wildlife Society* 

William G. Sheldon, Leader, Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, 

Yale University, B«A 9 , 1933; Cornell Univei'sity, M»S» (Biological Sciences), 
19li6, Ph.D. (Vertebrate Zoology), l°i;8. One summer Wyoming studying elk, 
one summer Nova Scotia on geological survey of bogs and lakes, three summers 
collecting mammals and birds in British Columbia for U,S, National Museum, 
two years Weyerhaeuser Timber Company, two years zoological expedition to 
China and Tibet for the American Museum of Natural History, four jears 
U.S. Army, U S, Fish and Wildlife Service stationed at University of 
Massachusetts since 19U8o Sigma Xi, Ecological Society of America, American 
Society of Mammalogists, American Ornithological Union, and Wildlife Society* 

Staff Publications 

Abbott, Herschel G, 1956a, Forest tree nursery practices. American Nurseryman 

S3 (6), k pp. 

^.^^^^^ ________________ • 195>6b c Artificial vs. natural regeneration of abandoned fields 

in New England* Proceedings, New England Section, 
Society of American Foresters, Annual Meeting, 1956. 

(with W„B. Becker and J.H. Rich), 1956c. Effect of lindane 

emulsion on insect invasion of x^hite pine sawlogs and 
the grade yield of resulting lumber. Journal Economic 
Entomology i;9s66I;-6, 

(with W,B. Becker) . 1956d. Effect of BHC emulsion sprays on 

insect invasion of hurricane-felled pine logs and the 
grade yield of result ing lumber. Paper delivered 
A e A.A.S. meetings, Dec. 1956 (to be published later). 

____________________ (with F,E. Cunningham), 1957. Is hardwood planting stock 

available? (Accepted for publication by the U.S. F*rest 
Service, Northeastern Forest Experiment Station as a 
Research Note.) 

In preparation: (l) with W.B, Becker, a third and final paper on a third trial of 
BHC sprays to control insects in logs, (2) a paper reporting results in an experi- 
ment to control bird damage in forest tree nurseries through the use of repellents. 



K 



'..'. I TV 



-8- 

Holdsworth, Robert P. 1930* Relationship of lumbering operations to adjacent 

agriculture. Southern Lumberman 138:66,68 

. 1935* Manwoods project for better land use in 1609. 
Journal Forestry 33:762. 



, 1936a. The place of ib restry in the nonprofessional school. 
Journal Forestry 3U: 395-98. 

(with J.D. Curtis and D. McCleary), 1936b. The reflecting 

crown meter. Journal Forestry 3hi 528-30. 

(with ¥,L, Doran and A D. Rhodes), 19li0, Propagation of 
white pine by cuttings. Journal Forestry 38:817. 

. 19bla. An adaptation of the Christen hypsometer, Journal 

Forestry 39:721-22. 

. 19Ulb. Multiple-use management applied to timberlands. 
Journal Forestry 39:868-9. 

tf 19^3. Some work on the white pine weevil. Journal 

Forestry lpL:lii3-h. 

. 191*5. Forestry at San Pietro American Forests $l:113.lMu 

1 1 1 ■ ■! .1 1 1 i n 11 11 1 w 

19U6. Forestry at Shrivenham American University, 

Journal Forestry hk* 191-2. 

. 1953a. Values in measuring the growth of forest trees. 
Mass, Extension Service, Special Circular 220. 

• 1953b. Growing pines in Massachusetts. Mass. Extension 

Service, Special Circular 37 Revised. 

♦ 1957. The farm forest. Mass, Extension Service Leaflet 
lii7 Revised, 

Mader, D.L. 1953. Physical and chemical characteristics of the major types of 

forest humus found in the United States and Canada. 
Soil Sci. Soc. Amer, Proc. 17:155-158. 

_____ _ ♦ 195ha # Certain microbiological characteristics of selected genetic 

types of forest humus. Transactions of the Wisconsin 
Academy of Sciences, Arts and Letters l*3:89«92. 

mmmm ^ mmmmmmmmm • 195Ub. Chemical and microbiological characteristics of the major 

genetical types of forest humus. M.S, Thesis, Univ, 
of Wisconsin Library. 

1956. Effect of humus of different origin in moderating the toxicity 

of biocides. PhD Thesis, Univ. of Wisconsin Library. 

. . 1957. Use of forest humus to reduce the toxicity to tree seedlings 

from insecticides, fungicides, and herbicides in the 
soil. Soil Sci. Soc. Amer. Proc* 1956 (in print). 



-9- 

In preparation J a paper reporting the results of applying chemical herbicides to 
forest tree nursery beds for the control of herbaceous weeds. 

McConnell, William P. (with L 3 E. Garvin) 195>6. Cover mapping a state from aerial 

photographs, Photograrametric Engineering 22:702-7* 

Rhodes, Arnold D» (with H*W, Hicock and A.R, Olson). 1939. Volume > tables for 

plantation- grown white pine in Connecticut. Conn. 
Agr. "xp« Station B ul. U27, 

_. 19iiO. (See Holdsworth, 19kO). 



. 1953. Role of science in the professional forestry 

curriculum. Journal Forestry 5lsU36«l.j0. 

. 1956, Comparison of lead arsenate, methoxychlor, 

and benzene hexachloride for control of white pine 
weevil. Journal Forestry 5U:13h~5« 

In preparation! (l) a report on thinning tests in red pine over a period of 
ten yea.s, (2) a report on the effect of certain herbicides applied in different 
ways, dosages^ and seasons as a means of killing broadleaved trees and controlling 
subsequent res pr outing s 

Rich, J* Harry, 193ta An American Civilian Conservation Corps. Scottish Forestry 

Journal 1*8: 39~l*2. 

<■ 19h3t Increased veneer production by better log-making practices. 

Report, Forest Products Laboratory-, Madison, Wisconsin. 

• 19kh* The effect of sweep on the yield of veneer * Report, 

Forest Proucts Laboratory, Madison^ v/isconsin, 

» 19b5. The status cf wood fibre as a component of saturating felt 

used as a base for asphalt. Report,- Forest Products 
Laboratory, Madison^ Wis-.; ona in. 

o 195h* Dividends from pruni.ng forest oreeso University of Mass. 

Ext 8 Leaflet 272, 

(with George E\, Sisterhenm), 1956a, Marketing Forest Products in 

Massachusetts. Mass* .Agr* JSxp, Station Bul« 1*92. 

o 1956b e ° (See Abbott •> 1956c.) 



Sheldon, William G. 1932 * Mammals collected or observed in the vicinity of 

Laurier Pass, B.C. Journ. Mamm. 13 (3):196~203. 

» 1937. Notes on the Giant Panda. Journ. Mamm. 18 (l)l3~19« 



» 19i+l« A Pan-ilmerican treaty on nature protection, American 
Wildlife , January-February tUC— US • 

. 19i*8. Mr, fox. Your Field Sports 1(3), 



• 19U9a, Research, the solid foundation. Your Field Sports 2 (6). 



-10* 

i 19li9b* A trapping and tagging technique for wild foxes. 

~ Jounu Wildl, Mgt, 13(3) s 309-311. 

, 19U9c, Reproductive behavior of foxes in New York State* 
Journ. Mamm, 30 (3) : 236-21*6, 

• * 1950, Returns on banded red and gray foxes in New York State* 

Journ, Mamm, 3lul25~126. 

, 1950. Denning habits and home range of red foxes in New York 
State. Journ, Wildl. Mgt. 13(l):33~i*2. 

. 1952* Studies on breeding woodcock in Massachusetts, In 

investigations of woodcock, snipe, and rails in 1951. 
U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv. Spec. Sci. Report — 
Wildl. No. Ik, pp. 30-Uu 

________ _____ _. 1953a. Report on woodcock investigations in Massachusetts- 
spring 1952. In investigations of woodcock, snipe, 
and rails in 1952. U,S, fish and Wildl. Serv, 
Spec. Sci. Report- -Wildl. No. 18, pp« 28-29. 

. 1953b. Woodcock studies in Massachusetts. Trans, N, Airier* 
Wildl. Conf, l8;369-377 a 

. 1951* • Summary of Massachusetts woodcock studies, 1953. In 

investigations of woodcock, snipe and rails in 1953. 
U.S. J^ish and Wildl* Sarv Spec*, Sci, tteport-»- 
Wildl, No. 2{*, pp c 35-39., 

. 1955 • Methods of trapping woodcocks on their breeding grounds, 
Journ. Wildl, F^to 19:109-115* 

• 1956a, Massachusetts woodcock studies in investigations of 

woodcock, snipe and rails in 1955. U.S. Fish and 
Wildl Zqxy* Spec, 3ci„ Rept„- -Wildl a tijl, pp. 35-UO, 

, 1956b. Wildlife cover, maps. Massacnusetts.. Wildl »VII (2):li*-l5# 

" , 1956c. Annual survival of Massachusetts male woodcocks. 

Journ. Wildl, Mgt* 20:1*20-1*27. 

. • 1956d. Milestones in wildlife conservation (a history of the 

Boone and Crockett Club).> Completed manuscript (book) 
preparing for publication, 

_______________ (with F. Shaw and L,R. Bartlett). 1956. New records of 

hipooboscids on woodcock. Proc. Ent, Soc. Wash, 
58(1) :13. 

, 1957. Snowshoe hare in Massachusetts. Massachusetts Wildlife 
VIII(1):12-15. 

Trippensee, R.E. 193h. Biology and management of the cottontail rabbit. PhD. Thesis, . 

• 1933-ii. The cottontail and cover, American Game. Sept. -Oct, 

1933:72, Nov.-Dec. 1933*88,9**, Jan.-Feb. 193U:9,13-Hu 



• I . 



••li- 



ft 193ha» A suggested method of measuring cover with particular 

reference to cottontail rabbit. Trans, 20th American 

m » 193^b. A new deal for wildlife in the Lake States and Ozarks, 

The National Waltonian* 

(with H 6 Adams) „ 1935a, Wildlife handbook, U e S c Forest Service, 
Region 9 } Milwaukee, Wisconsin,, 

. 1935b. Hoitf many ruffed grouse can we shoot? The National 

Waltonian, 

-# 1935c. Cooperative deer hunting. American Wildlife 2l*:87, 92-3« 

. 1936a. The reproductive function in the cottontail rabbit 

( Sylvilagus floridanus mearnsii Allen) in southern 
Michigan. Trans e North American Wildlife Conf<>1936: 

_• 1936b Means of increasing wildlife— a handbook of conservation. 

Sec a for Preservation of Landscape Features of 
Essex Co,, Mass.:3U~39. 

, 1936c o Wildlife management in the United States: past, present j 

and future. Forestry Chronicle 12:375-81. 

_. 1937a g The development and use of state forests in New England 

in relation to wildlife Jour. Forestry 35:^03-8. 

(with J*D* Curtis). 1937b. Proposed study of timber and wildlife 

production in central New England. Jour. Forestry 35 

1111-5 • 

^ 1938o Food relationships of the cottontail rabbit in southern 

Michigan. Trans. North American Wildlife Conference: 
79l;-80iu 

_. I9I4I0 A new type of bird marker. Jour* Wildlife Mjgt. 5:120-22. 

9 19li8« Wildlife management-upland game and general principles, 

Volume 1. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 

+ 1953» Wildlife management- furbearers, waterfowl, and fish. 

Volume 2. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New Yorko 



Project No* 
Hatch 72 



Hatch 73 



Hatch 71+ 



Hatch 75 



Hatch 76 



Hatch '77 



Hatch 78 



Forest Research in Progress 
Title and Brief Description 

i i n I., i L ■ i m -i - ii i ii -i i i *t-- 1--- —-*■ 

The Culture of Coniferous Nursery Stock in Massachusetts* 

(Work to date has been concerned with the testing of numerous 
herbicides to control weeds in nursery beds, and of various 
new repellents applied to seeds to control damage by birds. 
Results in both cases have been most encouraging.) 

Forest Stand Improvement by the Use of Chemicals to Kill 

Inferior Trees., 

(Trees on a\ arter and full acre plots have been treated with 
different herbicidal materials in varying dosages* manner and 
season of application to determine lethal effect and influence 
on degree of resprouting. In the latest series, plots have been 
treated each month throughout the year J 

A Method to Minimize the Adverse Effect Upon Tree Form of 

Attack by the White Pine Weevil. 

(A test of pruning the crowns of sapling white pines as a means 
of correcting the deformity of stem caused by attacks of the 
white pine weevil.) 

Growth and Yield of Managed Forests. 

(A long-range (h0~60/ years) study of stand growth based on 
permanent sample plots on which all trees are individually tagged 
and their development recorded. Records are kept of growth, 
mortality, materials removed in periodic thinnings, etc. 
Twenty- seven plots have now been established involving appr oxi- 
mately U000 trees, the earliest units dating back 10 years.) 

Natural Regeneration of Eastern White Pine from Seed, 

(The effect of seedbed characteristics on the natural establishment 
of white pine,) 

fcological Succession on Abandoned Farmlands in Massachusetts. 

(A study of succession on old fields and other abandoned agri- 
Cultural land as it effects wildlife habitat and cotoverei.en : -to 
forest. 

Influence of Soil Conditions on the Growth of Forest Stands: 
Part I - Red Pine. 

(An analysis of soil and topography as factors in the gr • th 
and yield of red pine. This study, now underway, has been 
proposed for inclusion in regional research project NE-27 invol- 
ving several state experiment stations in the Northeast * If the 
proposal is accepted, as seems likely, it will receive substan- 
tial additional financial support. It is this project on which 
our first graduate student will be engaged if we are permitted 
to give graduate work.) 



Hatch 123 Marketing Forest Products in Massachusetts 

(Massachusetts * contribution to regional project NEM-6, a study 
of the factors affecting the sale and distribution of products 
produced on farm forests*) 

Hatch 136 Artificial Regeneration of Eastern White Pine and Other Conifers 

by Dire ct Seeding, 

(A study of forest establishment by direct seeding as a substitute 
for establishment by planting trees, concerned with such 
problems as seedbed preparation, bird and rodent control, and 
seed treatment,) 

In addition the Department is carrying on nine research projects in wildlife 
management on which seven graduate students are working. One project is sup- 
ported by the Agricultural Experiment Station, the other eight are carried on 
under the Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Res arch Unit stationed at the 
University*, A list of these projects follows, details of which may be found in 
the quarterly reports of the Cooperative Units 

1. Ecological Survey Project 

Vegetative type mapping of the state from aerial photographs* 

2, Evaluation of Forest Types as Game Cover 

A study of the correlation of tree crown cover as depicted on 
ecological survey maps and ground cover, 

3© Posted Land Study 

A statistical analysis of extent and reasons for posting private 
lands in Massachusetts, 

lu Ruffed Grouse Project 

(1) A long-term study of the effect of land change and hunting on 
grouse populations© 

(2) The development of a census technique to establish a spring 
index of grouse populations, 

3>, Woodcock Project 

A long-term intensive study of ecology, behavior, and populations 
of this migratory upland game study. Federal regulations are based to 
some extent on Massachusetts study 



-Hi* 

6. Deer Project 

An analysis of the status of the Massachusetts deer herd as revealed 
from data collected at the annual state deer-kill checking stations* 

7» Otter project 

A study of the importance of the otter as a fish predator in Quabbin 
Reservation and its economic importance in the state. 

8, Porcupine Control Project 

Development of effective poisons and repellents for the Canadian 
porcupine c 

9% Bird Control Project (supported by Agr, Exp, Station) 

Development of effective ccntrol ox passerine birds which destroy 
agricultural crops of various kinds. 



-1£- 

FORESTRY 
ArtaAlA D« ilhddes, major adviser 

Applicants for admission who plan to major in forestry customarily should 

have completed an undergraduate major in that field* An exception may be made in 

the case of individuals having a strong background in a related discipline or the i 

basic sciences. Candidates for a Masters degree majoring in forestry must complete 

a thesis as a requirement for graduation. Emphasis may be in the area of forest 

soils j forest ecology, silviculture, or marketing. 

COURSES OPEN TO GRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY 

(For either major or minor credit) 

200* Special Froblems # --Selected research problems in forestry not related to the 

candidate ? s thesis© Credit, 3 

The Staff 

201. Advanced Forest Soils. — the relation of soils to tree growth and other 
environmental factors with particular emphasis on research methods, site evaluation, 
water relationships^ and fertility; laboratory and field exercises. 

Credits 3 

Hr c Mader 

202. Aerial Photo~Interpretation t — Advanced aerial photo-interpretation emphasizing 
the analysis of natural vegetation^ especially forest vegetation; a wide selection 
of aerial phoccgraphr* are available for interpretive study and cartography* 

Prerequisite^ Forestry 171 or equivalent* Credit, 3 

Mr MacConnell 

203 o Advanced Forest Ecology^ -"-Forest environment, how it may be altered, and the 

effect of such alteration upon forest establishment and deve3.opment D 

Prerequisite, Forestry lf>3 or equivalent a Credit* 3 

Mr c Rhodes 

300 a Thesis 3 Master s Deg:^ee Credit.. 6-10 

The Staff 



fr'*t.< 



vU 



. ■ •* 



*16- 

COURSES OPEN TO BOTH GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
(For either major or minor credit.) 

13>3. Silvics.— Forest ecology as a foundation for silvicultural practice: the 

physiological basis of forest ecology; environmental factors, their effect upon 

vegetation, and how they are influenced by it ; the development and silvical habits 

of the individual tree 5 the development, characteristics and classification of 

forest communities; plant indicators; methods for the study and analysis of 

vegetation and its environment. 

Two class hours; one lb-hour laboratory period. Credit, 3 

Mr. Rhodes 

l£U, Forest soils. --The structure, development and maintenance of forest soils; 

their relationship to applied silviculture and forest productivity; the literature 

of forest soils with special reference to American e:xperience© 

Three class hours. Credit, 3 

Mr. Mader 

155. Elements of Forest Mensuration — Methods of determining the volume and value 
of the forest growing stock; type mapping as it pertains to timber cruising, the 
field work includes mapping and timber estimating on forest realistic in si ze and 
condition and the submission of inventory reports. Given each summer and in 
alternate years the first semester. 

Two class hours j one labour laboratory period* j^ MacConnell 

Summer courses 3 UiHaour weeks. Mr Bond 

l£6. Principles of Silviculutre. The methods of establishing and developing 

forest stands through the application 6£ correct silvicultural practice. Inter- 

mediate cuttings and reproduction systems, Field w>rk in applied silviculture, 

including the marking of forest stands for silvicultural treatment, is given on 

University forest property^ Credit, 3 

Two class hours; one inhour laboratory period. Mr Rhodes and 

Mr. Holdsworth 



-17- 

l£7. Forest Economics and Policy, **»This course considers the forest as a resource 
yielding direct forest values and social benefits. The history of American forestry 
and the development of a forest policy together with the role of the forest in 
American economy are considered. Credit, 3 

Three class hours o Mr« Holdsworth 

159, Forest Protection*— The principles of protecting forests from all harmful 
agencies but with special reference to the prevention and control o$ forest fires, 
insects, and disease. Other agencies are treated in accordance with their 
importance. Credit, 3 

Three class hours, Mr, Abbott 

171, Aerial Photogranuietry,— Principles of photogrammetry leading to the appli- 
cation of aerial photography in forest management, wildlife biology, engineering, 
geology, and other fields dealing with large land surfaces. Photographic inter- 
pretation and map making from aerial photographs are laboratory activities. 
Two class hours) one U-hour laboratory period* Credit, 3 

Mr e MacConnell, Mr. B ond 
17£» Manufacture and Distribution of Forest Products, —A study of the techniques 
of manufacturing forest products, including production and cost studies; also the 
seasoning, grading and special processing prerequisite to marketing,, 

Three class hours. Credit, 3 

Mr. Rich 

Iro, Wood Technology, —The structure, composition and properties of wood in 

relation to its economic utilization) wood-liquid relationships as they affect 

seasoning, preservation, and technological process for industrial purposes, A 

survey of the technological advances in the use of wood. Credit, 3 

Three class hours , Mr, Rich 



•\,1 



■ > , 



180* Principles of Forest Managanent^-The organization of the forest for sustained 

yield management with a study of the underlying principles* Forest regulation. 

The preparation of forest management plans* Credit, 3 

Prerequisites, Forestry \$$ and l£6, Mr, MacConnell 

181* Regional Silviculture*— The practice of silviculture as applied in the 

several forest regions of the United States with special reference to the treatment 

of the tree species of commercial importance* Emphasis is given to the factors, 

both natural and economic, which govern silviculture in these regions* 

Three class hours* Credit, 3 

Mr* Rhodes 

182. Artificial Propagation of Forests, and Forest Tree Improvement, — Reproductive 

characteristics of forest trees, artificial propagation of forest stands by direct 

seeding and forest planting, nursery management and problems, fundamentals of tree 

improvement through provenance tests, selection of superior phenotypes, and 

hybridization* Credit, 3 

Two class hours; one li-hour laboratory period* Mr* Abbott 

18£» Air Seasoning and kiln dryings— A study of the proper conditioning of wood 

products by air seasoning and kiln drying, of moisture relation inttie wood, and 

of kiln operation* ' Credit, 3 

Three class hours* Mr* Rich 

COURSES FOR MINOR CREDIT ONLY 
(No graduate credit for students majoring in Forestry*) 

2$1q Forest Management of Watersheds # «»-Adraission on recommendation of student e s 

major adviser* A study of forest site— water factor relationships; the improvement 

of watershed forests through applied silviculture; relative suitability of tree 

species for watershed uses; forest protection measures* Credit, 3 

Three class hours* Mr # Holdsworth 



_ r -~_- ;;.. : ' '■ 






bourses in Other Departments for ia/nich 
"Major or-ftlnor Credit will be -Given 



Agricultural Economics 155* Mar.ketirigi 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Lindsey 



Agricultural Economics 177. Elementary Experimental Statistics Credit, 3 

Mr, Russell 



Agricultural Economics 17°. Elementary Economic Statistics 

Agricultural Economics 180. i-dvanced Statistical Method. 

Agricultural Engineering 173. Farm Structures. 

Agronomy 263* Chemistry of the Soil 

.Agronomy 261u Experimental Methods in Agronomy 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Russell 

Credit, k 
Mr. Russell 

Credit, 3 

Mr. 



Agronomy 157. Soil Formation 



Agronomy 179* Soil Physics 



.Agronomy 181jA» Soil Chemistry 



Agronomy 18I|B. Soil Chemistry Laboratory 



Botany 200. Special Problems 



Botany 202, 203. advanced Plant Physiology 



Botany 207 » Advanced Plant Ecology 



Ectany l£8. Microtechnique 



Ectany 181. Plant Ecology 



Bo* any 182 C Plant Geography 



Boo&ny 18 Q Plant Cytogenetics 



Credit, k 
Mr. Steckel 

Credit, 3 

Mr, Yegian 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Everson 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Steckel 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Steckel 

Credit, 2 
Mr. Steckel 

Credit, 1-5 
The Staff 

Credit, 2-ij. 
Mr. Kozlowski, Mr, Gentile 

Credit, 3 

Mr. Livingston 

Credit, 2 
Mr. Putala 

Credit, 3 

Mr. Livingston 

Credit, 2 

Mr. Livingston 

Credit, 3 

Mr. 



«*3« 



•Business itdministrsiiion 2ti # Accounting in Management 



Business Administration 222. Marketing Management 

Business Administration l6h» Personnel Management 

Business Administration 166* Transportation & Traffic 

Business Administration 173« Advertising 

Business Administration 176. Purchasing 



Credit, 3 
Mr # Colewell 

Creditj 3 
Mr* Hardy- 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Hackamack, Mr. Rivers 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Rivers 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Hardy- 
Credit, 3 
Mr. 2,ane 



Chemistry 151, 152. Organic Chemistry 



, Chemistry 181. Organic Chemistry 



Chemistry 183. Advanced quantitative Analysis 



Credit^ k 
Mr. Richie, Mr. McIJharten 

Credit, 3 
Mr. Cannon 

Credit, 3 
Mr* Roberts 






ntomology 212. Geographical Distribution of Animals & Plants Credit, 3 

Mr* Alexander 



Geology 15>1, 1^2. Mineralogy 



Geology l£l. Geomorphology, 



Pomology 1^2. Plant Breeding Methods 



Credit, 3 
Mr. Nelson 

Credit, 3 

Mr. Smith 

Credit, 3 

Mr. French 



















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